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Thread: We Have a Problem Re: Walks

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney
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    I'll also throw in my two cents worth and say it's never too late to go join a club and get some help.

    We have an elderly man at our club joined with his 3yo GSD, who has a combination of excitement and aggression, it's just so overwhelmed by all the other dogs it doesn't know if it should be friends with them or bite them.

    The man is going well to hold on to the dog.

    But after about a year of being with the club the dog is now able to walk onto the grounds, with his owners shoulder still in it's socket. Join in a class without driving the other members mad with it's barking.

    It did take some one on one help. An extra instructor was assigned to the class so that the main instructor's time wasn't taken up by this dog alone.

    There are lots of good clubs out there and lots of dedicated instructors, sometimes it takes a few weeks for the good one to surface and show an interest in the hard cases, but generally someone steps up.

    I'm sure Trooper is no where as a handful as this dog was. I'm sure with your dedication he will also come along in leaps and bounds.

    I think the BC is a great dog for you work on as you can walk past on a regular basis and practice holding Trooper's focus, especially if the BC likes to come to the end of the driveway and check you out. And is non reactive in return.

    Stride past at a swift pace as though nothing has happened, talk to him, have your food ready, slowly get closer the the BC. This may take some weeks.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    488

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    Thanks MAC. See, what you've described with the 3yo GSD is sort of what I think Troopa may be like at this stage. Excitement and, from what happened with the BC, aggression as he doesn't know how else to act.
    I've had the business card for the obedience training sitting on the fridge for weeks so tomorrow I will make the call and hopefully be able to arrange some one on one time with the instructor asap before joining the whole class.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

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    Megan, I have very little doubt that Troopa's reaction if any sort of aggression was certainly fear aggression, nothing else, because as you have already stated, he didn't know how to react. Lol.
    The again, I'm not really sure I;d call his reaction aggression anyway. Only time will tell, I guess.

    I think he will learn quickly how to relate with other dogs in the future.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

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    Hi Megan

    I can't make GSD specific comment like DA can.

    I can only make general dog language comments...

    A front attach harness would give you more control than one that clips on the back - unless it's one of the squeeze and lift sort (eg Sporn).
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/dog-train...html#post91694

    Dog socialisation can be taught to your dog. Tur
    Techniques to Calm Your Dog
    Turid Rugass wrote the book on calming dogs, her website is very helpful too.
    Questions and answers from Turid Rugaas

    So as you approach another dog with your dog, you need to firmly believe it is "no big deal" and tell your dog using dog language. Simplest way, is to lick your lips, look away from both dogs, look bored, and yawn slowly and obviously. You can also sniff the ground, but my dog would jump on me if I did that - she thinks it's play.
    You might be able get your dog to fake looking away and sniffing the ground by putting a really yummy treat or best ever toy on the ground away from the dog of interest.

    And then there is body blocking. You stand between your dog and the other dog and block your dog's view and then do the yawning licking look away thing and reward your dog the second its attention is on you instead of the other dog.

    Ideally you need to get your dog to greet and play with as many other dogs as possible. You may need to use a muzzle initially to prevent over excited accidents. And I'd recommend starting with dogs that are a similar size and speed to yours.

    Adelaide has a fantastic GSD club (I've heard from people who go there) on West Beach road. They do train other dogs but GSD is their thing and they would understand what your dog needs and have the perfect dogs for yours to learn from.

    Hope that helps.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    488

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    Hyacinth, thanks for the suggestions & links. I'll check them out in a minute.
    Unfortunately, I don't live in Adelaide. I'm a 3.5-4 hour drive from there. I would love to be there for the training aspect of things though, the one on West Beach road sounds wonderful.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

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    Welcome to our club

    I figure you could contact someone on the committee and ask them if they're visiting your area this year, or if they can recommend someone who lives near you.

    Judging by the committee info - a couple live at Willunga, and another lives at Gawler, some are breeders - probably need country space to do that properly with GSD - so there might be a member or three that live your way, and you could ask if they visit your area or if there are any events there that they'd be at.

    Asking couldn't hurt.

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