Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 75

Thread: The Difference Between....

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Floyd View Post
    Very well said BOH... & i'll 2nd your words.
    Thanks Deb, I thought you would agree

  2. #22

    Default

    The Staffordshire bull terrier is a medium sized, short haired dog that was originally bred for bull and bear fight. Dogs that are in the dogfight had proved were crossed. Eventually emerged as the current Staffordshire Terrier. After the ban on dog fighting and bull (1835) is the Stafford Terrier has become a valued companion, his bloody past he left behind. The Stafford Terrier is often described as "a big dog in a small package". The Staffordshire bull terrier should not be confused with the Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier (Amstaff), or the American Pitbull Terrier: these are bred in very different ways. When compared with these two other terriers still made, then the English Stafford, in any event the smallest of the three. The Stafford Terrier arose from a cross between an Old English bulldog and a terrier type. The dog was in 1935 by the English Kennel Club (KC) as a separate breed in 1974 and recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC). The variety is further by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC), the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), the Kennel Union of Southern Africa Kusa, the New Zealand Kennel Club (NZKC) and the United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized.
    The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a courageous, determined and intelligent dog. The dog needs a dominant hand and clarity and is fairly obedient. A Staffordshire Bull Terrier is energetic, playful and sometimes something of a tempestuous free spirit. The dog is territorial, attentive and watchful.

    In his contacts with other dogs, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier as a loner sometimes occur: these expired for some animals at adulthood smoothly. Two Stafford Terrier dominant males may exhibit behavior toward each other. Other pets, provided that the Stafford Terrier from an early age are accustomed to, usually no problem.
    Temperament
    Although individual differences in personality exist, common traits exist throughout the Staffords. Due to its breeding, the modern dog is known for its character of indomitable courage, high intelligence, and tenacity. This, coupled with its affection for its friends (and children in particular), its off-duty quietness and trustworthy stability, make it a foremost all-purpose dog [1]. It has been said that "No breed is more loving with its family"[3] Because of their affinity for children, Staffordshire Bull Terriers are sometimes known as “Nanny Dogs” in England[4].

    The breed is naturally muscular and may appear intimidating; however, because of their natural fondness for people[citation needed], most Staffords are temperamentally ill-suited for guard or attack-dog training.

    Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppies are very easy to house train. [5]

    [edit] Courage
    The most important characteristic of all the ancestors of the Stafford was their great courage. Aggression was necessary in a fighting dog - but, whereas a dog can be trained and conditioned to be aggressive, nothing can teach him courage. This is bred in him at birth. Breeders today value the courage of their dogs. Nobody is proud to own a timid Stafford, but no sensible breeder encourages aggression towards other animals. Responsible owners and breeders deliberately avoid confrontational experiences.

    Courage is important in a pet dog because more dogs bite out of fear than for any other reason. A dog who is not alarmed can cope much better with the rough and tumble of a busy family home, one of the reasons the Stafford is such a success as a dog for children. He is as hardy and fun-loving, and fearless, as they are. [6]

    [edit] Press on Bad Behaviour
    Since the UK Dangerous Dogs Act made it illegal to own breeds such as the pit bull terrier, the press have reported many cases of attacks by Staffordshire Bull Terriers or dogs described as a 'Staffordshire bull terrier cross' on children, adults and family pets.[7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] The RSPCA fears that breeders are re-naming pit bulls as Staffordshire bull terriers to avoid prosecution.[13] Also, the description 'Staffordshire terrier cross' is frequently a euphemism for a dog such as the American Pit Bull Terrier.

    However, the Staffordshire bull terrier, like all dog breeds, is capable of dangerous behavior. A New South Wales state government report analysing 793 dog attacks in late 2009 identified the Staffordshire bull terrier as the leading breed of dog responsible for biting humans (ahead of the Australian Cattle Dog, German Shepherd and Jack Russell Terrier).[14] "Staffordshire" type dogs topped a similar NSW government report in 2006.[15] However, while the report identified 279 of the 2325 total recorded attacks as by "Staffordshire" dogs, only 1 of those 2325 reported attacks was positively identified by the report as by an "English Staffordshire" (A.K.A. Staffordshire Bull Terrier). In contrast, 58 of those attacks were positively identified as by an "American Staffordshire," a uniquely different breed that is about 1/3 larger than the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

    The only time I have seen any agression in Ralph was when he was having a biff with my GSD. Two full males having a go. It only happened once! Those two were best mates.
    Ralph has been bitten twice by smaller dogs when we used to walk regularly. Did he retaliate? No he didn't, he looked at me and I told him NO!
    Anyway, was looking on the lighter side with my previous comment, as we need to some times. Do I trust Ralph 100%, yes I do and have always trusted him.
    Last edited by Bohemiannic; 03-28-2010 at 09:35 AM. Reason: Bolding

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    I think it really is the same with any breed or cross. Do I trust my cuddly wuddly sooky blue heelers?...I sure do..with me, however if kids, other dogs are around I would be on alert and all would be supervised as we just can not predict outcomes. Shads was a pure blue heeler, felt the same with him too.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #24

    Default

    My 2c worth...
    I know a Staffy breeder and her dogs are as nice as pie towards people (children included) But her kennels are separated by solid wood walls and steel wire as her males and females would quite happily rip each other to shreds.

    And yeah, Staffies and Pits are 2 different breeds entirely!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Its incredibly dangerous to trust a dog 100%.
    You can never know what a dog is thinking 100% of the time.
    Education not Legislation

  6. #26

    Default

    Well, having spent so many years with Ralph and never having a problem with his temperment, if I didn't trust him 100% even though he is old and ill, would I trust him to sleep on the same bed as me? Mind you still weighing in at 22 kg and full of muscle and still full jaw movement, he is actually quite fit!
    I trust him, I don't have a moments hesitation, neither does the cat! If he was going to turn, he could quiet easily kill me, but he hasn't.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bohemiannic View Post
    Well, having spent so many years with Ralph and never having a problem with his temperment, if I didn't trust him 100% even though he is old and ill, would I trust him to sleep on the same bed as me? Mind you still weighing in at 22 kg and full of muscle and still full jaw movement, he is actually quite fit!
    I trust him, I don't have a moments hesitation, neither does the cat! If he was going to turn, he could quiet easily kill me, but he hasn't.

    I have had my JRT for 11 years, he loves me, I love him, but I would never trust him alone with a child. He has never done anything to make me worried, but a 5 year old can't read a dogs warning signs.
    Lady the 7 year old Kelpie, she has kids/babies touching her eyes, sucking her ears, pulling her tail, holding her front legs so she is standing up while my younger cousins pretend they're dancing with her, but I still wouldn't trust her alone.
    What happens if Ralph is feeling completely harrassed, he tries getting away but can't, so he show some teeth, but it isn't noticed, kids still laying all over him, so he results in turning and giving a 'snap'.
    They arn't toys, they are living, breathing animals. You can never, ever trust them to be exactly how you want them.
    Would you trust a hand raised crocodile? Or tiger?

    What does sleeping on your bed have to do with anything?

    I have 13 year old Labs that come into the vet, 7 year old on the end of the lead, 4 kids come and give the dog love, squeezing, kissing etc.
    I get him on the table, touch and prod, results in the dog having to be muzzled. No dog can be trusted 100%. No matter the size, age, breed.
    Education not Legislation

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    1,822

    Default

    IMO in that situation, you as the owner are causing the problem by not actively being aware of your dog and what is happening. It is not the dogs trustworthiness that is in question, instead, because you as the dogs owner, leader and carer are letting the dog down.

    Basically, be responsible, be aware of what is happening with your dog and you won't have a problem. If you are lax with your supervision then you are at fault.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Explain to me what you mean by 'I trust my dog 100%'.
    Education not Legislation

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    1,822

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    Explain to me what you mean by 'I trust my dog 100%'.
    There is no way I would ever put him or leave him in a situation where he feels the need to defend himself from anything. There is NOTHING wrong with trusting your dog.

    Because he will NEVER be in that kind of situation, I trust him 100%. Heck, the farm dog I trust 200%. Nothing phases him anymore and he had some huge issues when he first arrived in my care.

    Why do you feel we are such 'lazy' owners (for lack of a better way of putting it) because we trust our dogs?

    I mean, there's no way we'd trust them because we've socialised them, cared for them, looked after them and ensured that we can trust them... Can there?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •