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Thread: Training Q's...

  1. #11
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    Put it this way Amy.

    If you figure out how to be the figure of authority NOW, you will be about 5% ready should you and your partner decide to have children in the future.


  2. #12
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    All I need to do with Doof is growl - NO or YUCK - but I rarely need to do it with him - not since I taught him fetch!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    Poppy will be a better dog due to consistency...kind, positive and gentle reinforcement and lots of love. She also needs to be told when things are not acceptable...eg setting boundaries and house rules. Remember...she is living in YOUR house...not the other way around

    I say NO...OFF...OUT...ENOUGH...SPIT IT OUT...SIT...DROP...UH UH...LEAVE IT...WAIT and I don't say it like I am politely asking them...I am telling them. I don't scream and yell.....but when I say...spit it out...I mean SPIT IT OUT NOW! Not in 10 seconds or 5 minutes when they feel like it, because then it might be too late eg if they found something dangerous.
    You sound like me. I don't ask politely...I tell her! This IS how it is! She has learn't OUT with regards to the walk in robe! That used to be her fave place to go and chew our clothes! Now I can be in the ensuite and say OUT and out she comes! Hehe!

    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Put it this way Amy.

    If you figure out how to be the figure of authority NOW, you will be about 5% ready should you and your partner decide to have children in the future.

    Oh gawd...I dont even want to think of what we will be like with kids! I am SUCH a stresser with Poppy! Imagine how I will be with a baby! OH has already pointed this out! Haha! Kids are DEF in our future though! I would have one yesterday! In fact we are one of those couples who got the puppy to put the baby making on hold! Lol!

  4. #14
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    Practice on the dog. Believe me, it'll help for when the time comes. NOT!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashaari View Post
    Think of a wild pack. If the pack leader doesnt like what the other dog is doing they will throw them to the ground and stand over them growling!
    Ashaari, you might want to review your sources of information. Your description of what a "pack leader" does has been debunked for wolves and for dogs.

    The Alpha Fallacy | Dog Star Daily

    I've seen bully dogs do stand over tactics on other dogs, but they never threw the other dog to the ground first. It rolls over on its own. And the stand over and growling never has anything to do with "correcting" the other dog. It's more about getting the other dog to "yield" and once it has, it can do what it likes. But this is not what I'd call "normal" dog behaviour. The bully dog isn't behaving normally.

    I've seen Frosty playing with her friends and several of them - will roll onto their backs before she even arrives to start wrestling and then they take turns with the "kill the antelope" neck hold on each other. No pack leader. This I'd consider more normal.

  6. #16
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    amy86

    There is a whole range of doggy behaviour training methods from only praising when they do right and the only correction being withdrawal of attention - eg Delta. This isn't very helpful in teaching a dog not to run on the road, although it is the method used to train a "conditioned response" that will eventually stop a dog from running onto the road when you call it. No correction is not helpful if you are trying to teach a dog "don't do that".

    And at the other extreme are the people who rub dogs noses in it, tie them up and squirt them with cold water, or yell and beat them when the dog eventually comes back. you can imagine this extreme is not very effective either.

    And then there is a balance - the centre of which varies a bit, between praise and gentle correction.

    So I use No, Off, "uh uh", water pistol, ignore, and run and hide as corrections for Frosty. The run and hide method is most effective for re-inforcing the recall because she really doesn't like it when she thought she knew where I was and I'm not there. Especially when we're not home. I also use lots of praise, pats, scratches, play (tug), and treats of varying desirabilty - roast beef, bread, dried liver for reward.

    So if you have to deliver a correction for trying to jump on the coffee table, make sure you are immediate with the praise when she gets off and does what you want. Give her something else to do like "come here" and loads of praise and pats when she does. Try to set her up for success. If you notice her eyeing the coffee table, call her over and tell her to sit, and praise when she does.

    As a puppy it's probably not a good idea to let her jump up or off anything higher than her shoulder / wither. This is especially true of the big breeds and the little breeds with short legs and long backs like lapsoo aso(?) and sausage dogs. It can lead to expensive problems with their spines and nerves (like paralysis of the back legs) later in life. Once she's grown it isn't as much of a problem as her bones are stronger and fully formed. But it's still not ideal for the short legged, long backed breeds. I've got dog owning friends who have just spent several grand on a problem that the vet associates with their dogs jumping on and off the couch.

    Not sure if this applies to farm dogs - who jump on and off the backs of utes from fairly young. My brother's staffy,as a puppy, broke a leg jumping off something it shouldn't have. It did not enjoy spending weeks in a crate.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    amy86

    There is a whole range of doggy behaviour training methods from only praising when they do right and the only correction being withdrawal of attention - eg Delta. This isn't very helpful in teaching a dog not to run on the road, although it is the method used to train a "conditioned response" that will eventually stop a dog from running onto the road when you call it. No correction is not helpful if you are trying to teach a dog "don't do that".

    And at the other extreme are the people who rub dogs noses in it, tie them up and squirt them with cold water, or yell and beat them when the dog eventually comes back. you can imagine this extreme is not very effective either.

    And then there is a balance - the centre of which varies a bit, between praise and gentle correction.

    So I use No, Off, "uh uh", water pistol, ignore, and run and hide as corrections for Frosty. The run and hide method is most effective for re-inforcing the recall because she really doesn't like it when she thought she knew where I was and I'm not there. Especially when we're not home. I also use lots of praise, pats, scratches, play (tug), and treats of varying desirabilty - roast beef, bread, dried liver for reward.

    So if you have to deliver a correction for trying to jump on the coffee table, make sure you are immediate with the praise when she gets off and does what you want. Give her something else to do like "come here" and loads of praise and pats when she does. Try to set her up for success. If you notice her eyeing the coffee table, call her over and tell her to sit, and praise when she does.

    As a puppy it's probably not a good idea to let her jump up or off anything higher than her shoulder / wither. This is especially true of the big breeds and the little breeds with short legs and long backs like lapsoo aso(?) and sausage dogs. It can lead to expensive problems with their spines and nerves (like paralysis of the back legs) later in life. Once she's grown it isn't as much of a problem as her bones are stronger and fully formed. But it's still not ideal for the short legged, long backed breeds. I've got dog owning friends who have just spent several grand on a problem that the vet associates with their dogs jumping on and off the couch.

    Not sure if this applies to farm dogs - who jump on and off the backs of utes from fairly young. My brother's staffy,as a puppy, broke a leg jumping off something it shouldn't have. It did not enjoy spending weeks in a crate.
    Thanks for the info. There certainly are a huge range of training methods! Just like there is a huge range of behavior management strategies for children I guess. We don't let her jump off the couch and she hasn't tried to jump off the coffee table! Both times she jumped up there I had to put her down!

  8. #18
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    It's funny, writing that about no jumping stuff. I'm just repeating what vet told the owners of the dog that was paralyzed - they were lucky there was no slipped disk or obvious spinal cord injury. They (the vets) think it was probably a blood clot that will dissolve on its own eventually and the dog is much better now. But for a couple of weeks it could not use its back end at all, which made toiletting no fun.

    I guess there are all sorts of things that are a risk - and you have to consider how big a risk that would be to you. Ie there might be 1000 dogs of all shapes and sizes jumping on and off couches and only one gets hurt that way. But 100 of those dogs get hurt in accidents with cars... I really should harness dog all the time. Sigh.

    PS I made those numbers up. Some risks are bigger than others, we just don't always work to reduce the bigger risks and sometimes panic about the tiny risks.

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