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Thread: Introducing Rescue Dog to Children

  1. #1

    Default Introducing Rescue Dog to Children

    Hi- we are adopting our first family dog- a 6 yr old male 30kg cross of somesort from the RSPCA. Pick him up next Monday. We have 2 sons, 4 yr old and 7 yr old - and are an active family with large yard (and hubby jogs 5km a day).
    We will start at a dog club 1 night a week in a fortnight (more for us than him I think...).
    We have bought a bed and harness, he comes with a leed. I really want to have a peaceful intro between dog and children and the "pecking order" well established. Any tips???? we want him to be a indoor and outdoor family pet/companion.

  2. #2

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    Have the kids been into the shelter to meet with the dog before it goes home with you?

  3. #3
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    I think the introduction should be done slowly to be honest and ALWAYS with supervision. It is a rescue dog and often they come with no prior history, so just be careful. Until you have assessed what sort of dog he is....calm/gentle/boisterous/dominant etc...make sure he os not left alone with the children

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    I think the introduction should be done slowly to be honest and ALWAYS with supervision. It is a rescue dog and often they come with no prior history, so just be careful. Until you have assessed what sort of dog he is....calm/gentle/boisterous/dominant etc...make sure he os not left alone with the children
    IMO Doesn't matter what size, breed or temperment of the dog they should never ever be left unsupervised with children. Otherwise I completely agree. Nor does it matter how long you've had the dog.

    They are first and foremost dogs. They can't talk and children lie when they know they've done something wrong (like pulling a tail or ears etc).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    IMO Doesn't matter what size, breed or temperment of the dog they should never ever be left unsupervised with children. Otherwise I completely agree. Nor does it matter how long you've had the dog.

    They are first and foremost dogs. They can't talk and children lie when they know they've done something wrong (like pulling a tail or ears etc).
    I never mentioned size etc, because to me it didnt matter what size, breed etc the dog is/has...always supervise!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetboy View Post
    Hi- we are adopting our first family dog- a 6 yr old male 30kg cross of somesort from the RSPCA. Pick him up next Monday. We have 2 sons, 4 yr old and 7 yr old - and are an active family with large yard (and hubby jogs 5km a day).
    We will start at a dog club 1 night a week in a fortnight (more for us than him I think...).
    We have bought a bed and harness, he comes with a leed. I really want to have a peaceful intro between dog and children and the "pecking order" well established. Any tips???? we want him to be a indoor and outdoor family pet/companion.
    How did you find the dog's temperament when you have visited him at the RSPCA?
    How much have they been able to tell you about his past background?

    I don't understand what you mean by expecting that the pecking order will be well established at the introduction?

    Personally, if it was me, I would ensure that your children are already at the house when he arrives.
    Is this your first dog?

  7. #7
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    I agree with Clea and Angela...and probably all the doggy people on this forum. Children the ages of your kids should NEVER be unsupervised around any dog - ever. From the age of about 12 or 13 + the kids can be reasoned with, until this time it is vital you are not trusting of either dog or kid.

    Also, please be aware that it will take up to 6 weeks for the dog to show it's true colours, so weeks 1,2 even 3 & 4 may go OK, then suddenly the dog will realise that this is home and he can relax, for good and for bad.

    I don't want to put you off, just make you aware. You are doing the right thing by starting school so quickly. Just make sure you spend 5 - qo mins every day reinforcing what you learn each week. Consistancy is the key here.

    Other ground rules should include: feed the dog either 2 hours before or 1 hour after you guys eat. Do not let the dog on beds or lounges for at least 3 months, and even then this must be done to a formula (please feel free to ask how to go about this at that time). Until then, bean bags on the floor are great to get down on the ground with the dog at his level. Make sure the dog is the last in or out the door/gate on every occassion. Quality vet kibble works out to be more cost effective than supermarket kibble in the long run, and finally a chicken neck or 2 or 3 a day will keep your dogs teeth in peak condition.

    Good luck!! And remember a well trained dog is a joy to live with while an untrained dog can be a nightmare!!
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  8. #8
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    IMO - and Im going to get jumped on - 9 times out of 10 a rescue dog is not suitable in a home with small kids. They either haven't been socialised, have had bad experiences, have behavioural probs etc. I adored all my rescues but it took WEEKS before I knew if they could be trusted with kids or not. Rufus - cuddly, kind, loving Rufus, head on your lap for a cuddle Rufus, off lead with kids, dogs, bikes and adults Rufus - cannot be trusted with small kids if they come close - he will snap.

    IMO all rescue dogs that go to families should be assessed by a rescue group after being with them for a number of weeks.

    It takes 6 weeks to get to know a dog. It doesn't matter one snapper if your kids meet this dog at the shelter or not - you wont establish any sort of pecking order until that time passes.

    I know people will say that me saying this is a death knell for many good dogs - but the fact is that most of the recent dog attacks on kids have been from rescues that came from pounds and dogs that were not socialised with kids

    I would be keeping your new dog away from your kids without supervision (I wouldnt trust a 4yo even with supervision) until you know its true nature.

    I have had rescues that were ace with kids - Flash...Billie...Sandy...

    but it takes one bite, one time, for a child to be scarred and a dog to be dead.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    IMO - and Im going to get jumped on - 9 times out of 10 a rescue dog is not suitable in a home with small kids. They either haven't been socialised, have had bad experiences, have behavioural probs etc. I adored all my rescues but it took WEEKS before I knew if they could be trusted with kids or not. Rufus - cuddly, kind, loving Rufus, head on your lap for a cuddle Rufus, off lead with kids, dogs, bikes and adults Rufus - cannot be trusted with small kids if they come close - he will snap.

    IMO all rescue dogs that go to families should be assessed by a rescue group after being with them for a number of weeks.

    It takes 6 weeks to get to know a dog. It doesn't matter one snapper if your kids meet this dog at the shelter or not - you wont establish any sort of pecking order until that time passes.

    I know people will say that me saying this is a death knell for many good dogs - but the fact is that most of the recent dog attacks on kids have been from rescues that came from pounds and dogs that were not socialised with kids

    I would be keeping your new dog away from your kids without supervision (I wouldnt trust a 4yo even with supervision) until you know its true nature.

    I have had rescues that were ace with kids - Flash...Billie...Sandy...

    but it takes one bite, one time, for a child to be scarred and a dog to be dead.
    Agree totally.

    I disagree with shar vic. I believe with furniture etc you start as you wish to continue so the dog learns first up whether is and is, or is not ok. Too much confusion otherwise. Mine eat when I feed them.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  10. #10
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    Op, as you have stated that the dog you are adopting is a '30 kilo cross of some sort', perhaps it would also help you to ascertain WHAT breeds the dog is. At least you may get some idea of what the dog's needs will be?

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