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Thread: Purchasing a Dog Through Rescue

  1. #1
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    Default Purchasing a Dog Through Rescue

    I am hoping to hear from Florence, Anne, and especially TKay. And of course any others who have given a home to a 'rescue' dog.

    I have only ever once 'rescued' a dog from a local shelter, and that was like over 20 years ago. And that was only because it was a GSD whom the manager of the shelter rang me about as soon as she came in! Lol.
    Every other dog has always been purchased from a reputable and registered breeder.

    Here's my dilemma. I have been notified via a friend of 2 particular dogs available for rescue interstate. I have had a look at the particulars of those dog on the web-site, and must admit I'm seriously interested at this stage.

    However, there are a lot of things I wish to know about these two dogs before I would even seriously consider discussing applying to rescue either one.

    How do others here, or how have you, gone about bombarding the rescuers with all the questions you need answered?
    How do rescuers ascertain the ticks etc for a particular dog - example, one dog is used to cats and small animals, another has only been introduced to one, another's reaction to small animals is unknown? Wouldn't it be reasonable for an unknown to be placed into a safe situation where the unknown at least can become a 'known?'

    Argg, so many questions...

    Any info would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Are you talking about being a foster carer or the forever home?

    I re read, forever home.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3
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    Forever home, Di.

  4. #4
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    I have always found that phoning is far better than an email. I write out my questions to ask first and make sure I ask every single one unless it's been answered already. Sometimes if the person I'm speaking to isn't sure I'll ask to speak to the foster carer or the person who has had the most contact with the dog. If you speak to the carers they have far more insight into the dog and are far more accurate with their responses.

    If you can get someone you know to go and meet the dog/s before you make your decision that would be the best way to go IMO. Make sure that the person who is meeting the dog for you knows what to look for and can give you a detailed run down of how the dog fits what you're looking for.

    Hope this helps, otherwise good luck!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    I have always found that phoning is far better than an email. I write out my questions to ask first and make sure I ask every single one unless it's been answered already. Sometimes if the person I'm speaking to isn't sure I'll ask to speak to the foster carer or the person who has had the most contact with the dog. If you speak to the carers they have far more insight into the dog and are far more accurate with their responses.

    If you can get someone you know to go and meet the dog/s before you make your decision that would be the best way to go IMO. Make sure that the person who is meeting the dog for you knows what to look for and can give you a detailed run down of how the dog fits what you're looking for.

    Hope this helps, otherwise good luck!
    Thanks Angela, that was most helpful. I was thinking that if my consideration does go fruther, then yeah, I would probably ask here who is in that state/area etc. Someone here might be able to help me assess the dog.
    Will see how things unfold and what answers I get first.

  6. #6
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    I know someone here who picked her BC from pet rescue interstate, based on the description that said "good with rabbits and children" and it is. It is also completely ball obsessed and she's got no idea to train it but she does give it plenty of exercise so everyone is happy all things considered.

    I got Frosty from AWL. I asked lots of questions about the puppy parents and where the dog came from and what it's life was like before it showed up at AWL and got zero answers. Maybe they didn't know or maybe they don't tell - I don't know. They didn't answer that question either. Ie if the girl on the desk couldn't see the info in the computer, there was no other way of finding out.

    I did ask some of the staff what they thought of her and her sister and that helped me decide even though Frosty looked somewhat ugly with a bucket on her head compared to her sister with two patches (symmetry) and no bucket. But Frosty was definitely the friendly one. And according to the staff - she had more personality. So I picked her. I didn't have anyone else to introduce her to so that was it. I rang a friend, chatted with her about it, and then took Frosty home (via my friend's place).

    I think most of the rescue places are interested in finding a forever home and they don't want the puppy / dog to boomerang so they will answer questions honestly if they can. There's no point someone taking home a farm dog and not being able to exercise or train it, there's no point someone taking home a rabbit eating dog when they need a rabbit friendly dog. etc etc.

  7. #7

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    My main dog here is a foster failure from Canberra. Luckily he was as perfect as described so fitted in well with the other fosters that were here at the time.

    Ask lots of questions and make sure the dog has the temp, size, age, etc that is suitable for your lifestyle and likes. I would also ask if there is anything negative about the dog that you should know, for example dog barks, fence runs etc.

    I'm not sure if you already own a dog, but if you do, the difficult part of interstate adoptions is that the dogs won't meet before you make your decision. I have had two fosters here that temp tested well in the pound and were deemed non dog aggressive only to get them here and find they reacted quite aggressively to other dogs.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I know someone here who picked her BC from pet rescue interstate, based on the description that said "good with rabbits and children" and it is. It is also completely ball obsessed and she's got no idea to train it but she does give it plenty of exercise so everyone is happy all things considered.

    I got Frosty from AWL. I asked lots of questions about the puppy parents and where the dog came from and what it's life was like before it showed up at AWL and got zero answers. Maybe they didn't know or maybe they don't tell - I don't know. They didn't answer that question either. Ie if the girl on the desk couldn't see the info in the computer, there was no other way of finding out.

    I did ask some of the staff what they thought of her and her sister and that helped me decide even though Frosty looked somewhat ugly with a bucket on her head compared to her sister with two patches (symmetry) and no bucket. But Frosty was definitely the friendly one. And according to the staff - she had more personality. So I picked her. I didn't have anyone else to introduce her to so that was it. I rang a friend, chatted with her about it, and then took Frosty home (via my friend's place).

    I think most of the rescue places are interested in finding a forever home and they don't want the puppy / dog to boomerang so they will answer questions honestly if they can. There's no point someone taking home a farm dog and not being able to exercise or train it, there's no point someone taking home a rabbit eating dog when they need a rabbit friendly dog. etc etc.
    Thanks Hy. I would like to assume that all rescue places are giving interested parties as much info as they can and being totally honest. I mean telling me a dog has sniffed noses with a cat and simply walked off, no problem at all, is what i want to hear, but only if it's the truth. Don't want to find out later it turned around and ate the damned thing! Lol.

    So how do the ppl who go through applicants handle all the questions from porspective purchasers? I'm assuming should the situation end up going further I will inudate them with all the questions I simply must have answers to. Will they get the ****s with me? I hope not! Because if they can't answera all my questions to the best of their ability and/or knowledge, well, no wonder rescued dogs get returned and the trials don't work out.

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=BULLYT;65082]My main dog here is a foster failure from Canberra. Luckily he was as perfect as described so fitted in well with the other fosters that were here at the time.

    Ask lots of questions and make sure the dog has the temp, size, age, etc that is suitable for your lifestyle and likes. I would also ask if there is anything negative about the dog that you should know, for example dog barks, fence runs etc.

    I'm not sure if you already own a dog, but if you do, the difficult part of interstate adoptions is that the dogs won't meet before you make your decision. I have had two fosters here that temp tested well in the pound and were deemed non dog aggressive only to get them here and find they reacted quite aggressively to other dogs.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, that is concern for me, naturally. The two dogs I've been told about are advertised as being 'great with other dogs.' Not good, or okay, or met a few without any hassle - but great. It would be awful to find a scenario like what you have mentioned above.
    Hence my asking for TKay's input, considering I know she has a rescue coming soon who hasn't met Jenna.

  10. #10
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    DA

    where are these other dogs? Any chance of sending someone you trust to check them out face to face?

    I'd say Frosty is great with other dogs but she doesn't get along with every dog and I never can tell much which ones will work and which ones won't. Well the dogs that don't speak dog properly - they tend not to work but they don't get along well with any dog themselves and Frosty isn't always the exception. She's really good with fear aggressive dogs though (carefully supervised) - she gives them no reason to be scared of her - such a big groveller.

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