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Thread: Martindale Collars for Smaller Dogs

  1. #1
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    Default Martindale Collars for Smaller Dogs

    Hi all,

    I was just wondering if you can use a martindale collar on a small terrier?

    A friend of mine got a JRTx from the animal welfare league, he is 3 yr old and a lovely dog but he lacks basic training, he pulls on lead, does not sit, stay, heal etc.

    she has enrolled in a training group but in the mean time she would like to walk him and use up some of his terrier energy.

    she has asked me because Pepsi has great training and a reliable recall.

    but i have no idea!

    any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    The only thing that I can think of suggesting is when she is walking the second he pulls turn and walk in the opposite direction, if he does the same do it again. It may mean that you only walk around in front of the house but he will start to pay more attention to her as his handler.

  3. #3
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    I think you can get a sensible harness for small dogs too. The front attach ones stop the pulling. My dog has eventually learned not to do it on the footpaths. She's good everywhere else.

  4. #4
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    I have used martingale collars before and loved them!

    However....they were not used to stop bad habits such as pulling.....TBH no harness, collar, lead etc etc is going to help this...need to stop the actual pulling itself!

    I used the martingale collars for Bailey, Tyson and Mully as they tended to be a bit more gentle on them than the original choker chain.

    I mean gentle as in - not kinking or pulling at hair etc.

    They are a great collar however you need to stop the initial pulling and then you can use ANY collar

    Good Luck

  5. #5
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    It requires training to stop a dog from pulling. Dogs will still pull on a check chain unless the handler knows how to apply the pop to prevent this and combines it with other training methods of which I will not go into as there are plenty of threads here that do.

    What the martingale is good for is dogs like whippets where their head is slender so that they can not back out of it. Also dogs with lots of hair and owners like me who are lazy and just like to slip the collar over the head.

    Some people swap from the check chain to the martingale that combines both the cloth and the chain and the clinking of the chain can be a reminder to the dog.

    You still need to get the right size or get one with adjustments.

  6. #6
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    A martingale is really a "half check" and provides some control in the same way a 'choke lead' or 'choker chain' would; except that it will not tighten indefinitely, only as far as the maker has allowed it to. This depends on the dog and measurements given.

    You can make them for any breed but they are not a 'magic bullet' to fix bad lead behaviour.
    Topdog collars (formerly Soverencraft.)
    www.soverencraft.com
    info@soverencraft.com

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    It requires training to stop a dog from pulling. Dogs will still pull on a check chain unless the handler knows how to apply the pop to prevent this and combines it with other training methods of which I will not go into as there are plenty of threads here that do.

    What the martingale is good for is dogs like whippets where their head is slender so that they can not back out of it. Also dogs with lots of hair and owners like me who are lazy and just like to slip the collar over the head.

    Some people swap from the check chain to the martingale that combines both the cloth and the chain and the clinking of the chain can be a reminder to the dog.

    You still need to get the right size or get one with adjustments.
    Mouseandchicken is right: training is what stops a dog from pulling, not what you put on its face or body. Get your friend to take the dog to some basic obedience training- will be good socialisation too.

    The problem that many people fall into is the dog does something wrong (ie pulls on the lead) so they get something that will allow the (the owner) to pull against the dog better. This teaches the dog to pull harder, then more often than not the owner goes out and buys something that will give them an even greater degree of control. In the situation, it's actually the dog training the owner to pull harder!!!

    Most pulling problems can be solved quite quickly and effectively with simple, consistent training. Every time the dog's front paws go out in front of the owner's legs, she should check the dog with a quick sharp pull on the lead accompanied by a verbal cue. As soon as the dog back in pace with the owner there should be no tension in the lead whatsoever. Doing this teaches the dog that if it decides to go in front of its leader it will be greeted with not very nice consequences (the quick pull and verbal cue) if it's walking alongside its leader, it is a relaxed and pleasant journey. Also, make sure your friend doesn't let the dog pull her to trees to sniff- the owner should always be in control and choose when and where the dog can sniff.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the advice, she is enrolled with a class and the instructor has suggested some one on one training, more for her than the dog i thnk!!!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by dog's best friend View Post
    Mouseandchicken is right: training is what stops a dog from pulling, not what you put on its face or body.
    That's what I used to think too. But I have since had a dyed-in-the-wool puller come into my family, and training does not help. She can be trained to a point, but no training can override her prey drive (she's just not all that bright...) and if she thinks there could possibly be rabbit around she will pull no matter what is around her neck.

    She will only not pull in one type of halter - and she does not like wearing it... tough luck I say, I've had enough stretched arms from her thankyou very much!

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