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Thread: Dog Related Occupations?

  1. #1
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    Default Dog Related Occupations?

    Hi guys, I was just thinking about how school starts tomorrow, and I was wondering, what job could I do that involves dogs and stuff? I want to start training for it as soon as i get out of school, So being a breeder is out until later on. I love training dogs, so maybe being a dog trainer, But I would be opening up my own business. I want to have my own business. I could have a, dog holiday places, for when you go away on holiday. I was thinking a vet nurse, but I dont really like medical stuff. I want to do stuffInvolving dogs. I want it to be my sole occupation, so I cant be a dog groomer. What jobs could I do?

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    You should do what we callVET down here - vocational education training. They have animal husbandry courses that go for 2 years as part of school

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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    You should do what we callVET down here - vocational education training. They have animal husbandry courses that go for 2 years as part of school
    Whats that?

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    Your best bet is to volunteer to help out at your vet - that will show you if you can handle being a vet/vet nurse. But that isn't working solely with dogs.

    You can volunteer at a shelter walking dogs etc. This is a real eye opener and will give you an idea of what happens in shelters and how different every dog can be.

    Pet Sitting and Minding takes a tonne of dedication and hard work. (I run a pet sitting business here in QLD) It's not an easy job at all and it's not usually the best paying. I have a second part time job as well to take care of the bills and expenses. I'm lucky to be allowed to take Batty into the office with me though.

    Grooming can actually pay really well BUT you need a good business sense, great marketing, AND you have to be the best at what you do. It is rare here in Australia though.

    Dog training takes years of study and practical experience. There are courses you can undertake (Part of the Veterinary Certification at university is Animal Behavioural Science) but nothing beats exposure to as many dogs as possible. You can read all the books you like but nothing will prepare you for what it's really like IMO.

    I actually took the VET course when I was in Tafe. It's I think Cert 2 towards becoming a Vet nurse. Animal husbandry is similar to animal nursing. It was a brilliant course and being in a country town showed me a lot of different animals (including being the only one brave enough to handle the possum that was in) and led to me working there after school every day and most Saturdays. Again this is very hard work and if you don't really want it then you will never make it work.

    Others may have different experiences to mine to share.

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    Lots of reading for you
    Vocational Education and Training (VET)

    talk to your career counsellor at school

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    Why can't you be a dog groomer? I know quite a few people that do that full time, either out of a dedicated trailer or a shop. The shops around here are flat out with up to 8 part time groomers as well as the woman whose business it is. Not that I need to take Frosty there, but people who do need to take their dogs, have to book weeks in advance, if they don't make the next appt during the current one - they don't get a next appt, so some even make their bookings for the whole year. And at between $40 and $60 per dog - not too bad.

    There's also dog ranger for the council. Some of the staff at the RSPCA and etc get paid - so there is dog boarding and shelters. Greyhound racing - though I don't know if you can make money out of that or not. I think there might be people associated with dog shows that get paid too. And then there is marketing and promotion for the dog food companies - ie the ones that distribute the prizes for dog shows. And there's the dog supplies shop - with dog leads, beds, food, special food and etc. Dog bakeries. Dog cafes, Doggy day care... some of these could be done in combination. Like here, the doggy bakery used to be run in conjunction with a dog groomers. Or doggy day care could be run in conjunction with doggy boarding.

    Some of these businesses are a little bit more difficult to make profitable with people getting stuff off the net, but I guess anything more hands on like actually walking the dogs, doggy day care, doggy boarding, bark busters franchise (doggy training) - you can't get that off the net. Well maybe a bunch of youtube of cats being naughty would keep my dog amused for ... 10 seconds.

    Oh and there's the guide dog trainers and the dogs as therapy trainers. Not sure if they make much money. And theres the quarantine beagles...

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    What I would really love to do would be owning a doggy day care, with boarding, traing and grooming. That is my dream. How would I go about starting to gain experience? Maybe I could offer a doggy minding/ walking serivce in the town where I live, to gain experience with dogs other than mine...

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    Do the vet animal handling course and do business management - academically that is the best start

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    You could join your local dog obedience club, and progress from there. They will teach you how to train your dog to competition level, and then you may be able to teach classes too - I know our club desperately needs more volunteers especially instructors, and from there you may be able to offer other club members or even people you meet at dog parks help. And it would also help to volunteer at rescues and spend time with the rescued dogs, teaching them to sit etc.

    There are also courses you can do at TAFE or wherever that will get you additional qualifications that people as customers will trust.

    In the mean time you will need to work very hard at saving your bikkies to set up your business. You may also want to take some small business classes at TAFE like book keeping and business management. Even if you eventually get someone else to do the book keeping - you will need to be able to check it's being done right because you're the one that will be held responsible/lose money if it isn't.

    For local dog walking - all you would need to do is make a small flyer with some contact details and distribute it around your neighbourhood. Start off with a very low rate, and increase it based on how busy you get.

    And there seems to be doggy physiotherapists, chiropractors, acupuncturists, massage therapists too. If you're in a big city there might be enough wealthy dog lovers to support these kinds of jobs. It will help if you do some study of doggy anatomy. Some of these people are fully qualified for humans but found they were doing more work on dogs.

  10. #10
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    Hy- what would be a fair low rate? And what should I say on the flyer?
    Last edited by Brittany; 01-26-2010 at 12:16 PM.

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