Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 49

Thread: Toy Breeds

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    2,960

    Default Toy Breeds

    To all the toy breed owners, I was wondering if they are as hard to train as I hear? I don't understand why so many elderly people have them if they require a lot of effort.

    Is this a rumour or does it hold a grain of salt?

  2. Default

    As a trainer, I don't believe the breed of dog has anything to do with trainability... you will find that owners of smaller breeds tend to let the dog get away with things that a larger dog wouldnt.... smaller dogs are often the pack leader in their own eyes for that reason.... it all comes down to the amount of work the owner is prepared to put in...
    Stafford Rescue Victoria
    0408 515 111

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    1,822

    Default

    I have a lot of elderly clients, most of whom have toy dogs, although a couple have larger dogs who are quite old.

    The dogs are the best cared for that I know, they have every need catered to but they have high expectations to live up to. The dogs are also very well behaved automatically. They are expected to be nice to kids, no matter what, they are expected to play nice with food etc. The only area they have any issues is walking on the lead. That's where I come in. Part of what I do with my business is walk the elderly peoples dogs for free. I also look after the dogs when the elderly have to go into hospital. The families usually give me a call when they are going into hospital and when they are coming out. It works well for them as they know that there is someone visiting each and every day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wodonga
    Posts
    2,672

    Default

    Ditto what Donna said. In addition, there are many man gregarious trainable toy breeds - Maltese, Poodle, cavvies, yorkies - all do really well at obedience.

    The most difficult dogs I ever trained had permissive owners - they were owners of all types of dogs but predominantly designer mutts that were a toy size.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    2,960

    Default

    That is so wonderful of you Angela

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    I have a lot of elderly clients, most of whom have toy dogs, although a couple have larger dogs who are quite old.

    The dogs are the best cared for that I know, they have every need catered to but they have high expectations to live up to. The dogs are also very well behaved automatically. They are expected to be nice to kids, no matter what, they are expected to play nice with food etc. The only area they have any issues is walking on the lead. That's where I come in. Part of what I do with my business is walk the elderly peoples dogs for free. I also look after the dogs when the elderly have to go into hospital. The families usually give me a call when they are going into hospital and when they are coming out. It works well for them as they know that there is someone visiting each and every day.
    That sounds like a wonderful occupation

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Elderly people usually have smaller dogs because they are smaller, can't do as much damage or pull as hard as bigger dogs.

    Trainabilty wise - a minature poodle can be sneaky smart but also loves learning new things - it's up to the owner.

    I know a couple of older dog owners with the wrong dog in my opinion - one of them has a large labrador and has had almost zero control since day one when it was small. I think she shouldn't have a dog at all because she - the owner - has trouble learning new things and teaching her dog anything. You can explain, or show her what works for her dog till you're blue in the face and it makes no difference. I suspect she and the dog has been graduated right through all the grades in our club just because various instructors have wanted to get rid of her.

    During one graduation her dog - in an off lead stay - got up and went over to Frosty and sat on Frosty. Needless to say - Frosty's stay was a bit less than fantastic too. But that dog "graduated" and Frosty didn't. I didn't think Frosty deserved to graduate (based on other things Frosty didn't do all that well) - even when Frosty eventually did but neither did the other dog IMO. Sheer persistance on the part of the owner, I give her credit for showing up every week.

    And the other dog that seemed to have the wrong owner was a very excitable kelpie x border collie with an older lady owner who could barely keep hold of her. That dog, unlike the Lab, did show marked improvement in behaviour but still seemed like a dog that was slightly too strong for the owner.

    The slowest learner out there was a labradoodle designer puppy. Theoretically labs and poodles have good brains but this dog seems to have neither. The owner was a bit soft too but seemed willing to show up. And there were a few owners that are still in the "rub the dog's nose in it" dark ages but they don't tend to stay very long - our club isn't a good fit for them either.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    FNQ
    Posts
    1,327

    Default

    I think that the breed of the dog does has an effect on their trainablity, eg Border collies. From my experience, some toy breeds are more difficult, but this depends on their temperement. Bella has problems with selective hearing, but not much else. Maybe this is because she is part maltese, which are very trainable.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    2,960

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boxerini View Post
    I think that the breed of the dog does has an effect on their trainablity, eg Border collies. From my experience, some toy breeds are more difficult, but this depends on their temperement. Bella has problems with selective hearing, but not much else. Maybe this is because she is part maltese, which are very trainable.
    This would concern me....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    2,960

    Default

    Thanks for your replies guys.

    From what I've seen, working breeds tend to be the most intelligent and trainable. But maybe that's because they are expected to?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •