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Thread: Toy Breeds

  1. #21
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    I didn't say I was right...I asked for other people's experiences with toy breeds as I was ignorant. Never said I am right. Toy breeds are totally untrainable.

    Yeah, I am young. Here to learn. I learn by asking questions. If I give the wrong response, hopefully someone will explain to me what I'm confused about.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disneygotpierced View Post
    I didn't say I was right...I asked for other people's experiences with toy breeds as I was ignorant. Never said I am right. Toy breeds are totally untrainable.

    Yeah, I am young. Here to learn. I learn by asking questions. If I give the wrong response, hopefully someone will explain to me what I'm confused about.
    What?

  3. #23
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    Whoops! I meant to say I never said toy breeds are not trainable. Bad time to poorly construct a sentence

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disneygotpierced View Post
    To all the toy breed owners, I was wondering if they are as hard to train as I hear? I don't understand why so many elderly people have them if they require a lot of effort.

    Is this a rumour or does it hold a grain of salt?
    Charlie is proving to be quite easy to train - he's a bit of a smarty pants, picks stuff up very quickly and loves to show off.

    Bella.... she's easily distracted and as she's so bloody low to the ground I sometimes have trouble keeping her head up. She picks stuff up very quickly once I get her attention though. We had a great walk/training session tonight

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Masha View Post
    That sounds like a wonderful occupation
    Quote Originally Posted by Disneygotpierced View Post
    That is so wonderful of you Angela
    Don't make me out to be a saint I still run as a normal business with paying clients etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boxerini View Post
    I think that the breed of the dog does has an effect on their trainablity, eg Border collies. From my experience, some toy breeds are more difficult, but this depends on their temperement. Bella has problems with selective hearing, but not much else. Maybe this is because she is part maltese, which are very trainable.
    The selective hearing is because you aren't of high enough value in her eyes for her to listen to. What she is doing is better in her opinion. Training is about changing that so you are the highest value to her. Search for the Triangle of Temptation and start doing that with her, you will see a marked difference. Just make sure you do start from scratch with the program even if Bella already does things that are mentioned in there. My 13 week old puppy is doing the TOT perfectly without a leash and has been for around 2 weeks now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    Once again the point seems to have sailed right over...

    The best dogs for training are any dog - it all depends on the handler and their understanding of their dog
    Very well said! Every dog is capable of learning, training and doing very well with obedience etc. It depends entirely on the handler/s and their determination, the amount of time they put into training and their ability to find what works best for their dog. Does that make more sense Dis? It truly is up to the handler, IMO breed doesn't matter although the size of the dog does need to be in relation to the owner - purely because a 75 year old woman who is relatively weak isn't going to be able to handle a hyperactive young Ridgeback for example. This is why smaller dogs are favoured by the elderly - plus lap dogs are brilliant company to those who have been left alone by the passing of their spouse or the moving of their family. Please excuse the massive generalisation there everyone, there are exceptions to every rule!

  6. #26
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    look Dis, let me tell you a story.

    My aunt has a toy breed. Maltese X. It is very trainable. She has trained it to accept no food other than Steak Diane and chicken breast fillets. She has trained it that it cannot physically walk, and must be carried everywhere it goes, including the toilet. She has trained it that if it whimpers or lifts a paw it will get exactly what it wants immediately. She has trained it to accept clothes and little shoe thingies.

    Now, my aunt really is a dumb bitch, but that dog is really trainable. Sigh.

  7. #27
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    That really sucks.

    But I think I get where you're coming from..The dog will learn from what it's allowed to get away with just like a human?

    Btw shoes on a dog? Really?

  8. #28
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    Yes, really. Wouldn't say it otherwise. No, it wasn't a case that the dog was allowed to do these things - it was literally trained to do these things.

  9. #29
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    That's...Um...Wow.

  10. #30
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    It's disgusting. The woman is an utter moron!

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