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Thread: Any Breed You DON'T Like?

  1. #281
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    Oh, of course I have to admit when I do see a Pitbull, I get nervous? I instantly think "uh oh," if you know what I mean Because of that 1 bad experience.
    I try not to judge dog breeds too much, I mean when it comes right down to it - who teaches the dog whats right and wrong? The owner. Its the OWNERS responsiblity to make sure their pet is happy, secure and obedient.
    BTW. I <3 your username, "Judge the deed, not the breed" - its true
    © Demi's Blog ©
    Mollie; ChihuahuaXWestie; MY sunshine.xo

  2. #282
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    Thanks Demi....I love my user name too...thats why I picked it

    I know it is hard to not feel the "uh, oh" with any dog if you have had a bad experience with that particular breed. But honestly there are many bad eggs with every breed. And just so often you will find a rare gem amongst those bad eggs.

    *sigh* I wish you could meet Bailey I would GUARANTEE she would change your mind about Pit Bulls! She really is my angel

  3. #283
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    Hey Judge guess what? I'm seriously considering getting a pit or some bull breed once I'm more experienced with dog breeds. Been reading up on them and they sound like 'the one' for me...Besides pei's of course!

  4. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disneygotpierced View Post
    Hey Judge guess what? I'm seriously considering getting a pit or some bull breed once I'm more experienced with dog breeds. Been reading up on them and they sound like 'the one' for me...Besides pei's of course!
    Thats great Dis but I really hope you read up and even go to shows or obedience training etc ...... SOMEWHERE where you can meet them in person and see what they are like.

    They are A LOT of hard work ...like any breed!

    They need A LOT of socialisation and you really need to know the ins and outs of BSL etc too.

    They are stubborn and absolutely thrive for human contact (not much more than any other breed, but a little) you need to have a lot of time in your life for one.

    Oh and just remember their life span is on average 15 years so be prepared to have one around for 20 or more

    Good luck with it ...in the meantime do LOTS of reading mate

  5. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeTheDeedNotTheBreed View Post
    Thats great Dis but I really hope you read up and even go to shows or obedience training etc ...... SOMEWHERE where you can meet them in person and see what they are like.

    They are A LOT of hard work ...like any breed!

    They need A LOT of socialisation and you really need to know the ins and outs of BSL etc too.

    They are stubborn and absolutely thrive for human contact (not much more than any other breed, but a little) you need to have a lot of time in your life for one.

    Oh and just remember their life span is on average 15 years so be prepared to have one around for 20 or more

    Good luck with it ...in the meantime do LOTS of reading mate
    Yep, that's why I want to wait till I'm older, more experienced, in my own home and I've done plenty of research, and socialized with pits at shows etc to be 100% sure.

    I'm so grateful to this board but mainly you for making me realize that whilst pits were originally bred to fight, properly bred are sweet noble dogs.

  6. #286

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    After some 35+yrs around various, mostly medium/large dogs (and at one point on our farm we had 6 dogs at the same time, 3 Rott's, JRT and x 2 FT's ) I will say 3 things from my personal perspective:

    1. Rotti's are by FAR my favourite breed.

    2. At least the Chihuahuas or similar 'lap' dogs I've met, have been poorly trained around the house and/or out and about. Why do these owners think it's ok to have a 30ft retractable leash who let THEIR dog led THEM from so far in front and when THEIR lap dog barks (opps I mean YAPS!) at MY Rotti who is on a short leash, by my side and does not react I'm deemed to be the one with the 'dangerous' dog?!?!?!?! Really?) in fact the ONLY dog to ever attack me was a Chihuahua so therefore these lap dog type breeds are on the very bottom of my list. In fact they don't even make any list but the problem isn't the breed......that said I'd never own one.

    3. Probably THE single most important thing I've learnt after seeing many problem horses and dogs is that the OWNER is KEY. Therefore before anyone gets stuck into me about how awesome their lap dog is and how dangerous my Rotti is I'd say the ONE BREED I DON'T LIKE IS A BAD OWNER. Much like children, pets are a product of their environment. A lack of attention, training or care can see ANY DOG turn into a bad egg (and what's really sad is it's not their fault).

    Rotti's for life or is that GOOD OWNERS of any breed for life (won't somebody think of the dogs!!!) hahaha

  7. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepperoni View Post
    After some 35+yrs around various, mostly medium/large dogs (and at one point on our farm we had 6 dogs at the same time, 3 Rott's, JRT and x 2 FT's ) I will say 3 things from my personal perspective:

    1. Rotti's are by FAR my favourite breed.

    2. At least the Chihuahuas or similar 'lap' dogs I've met, have been poorly trained around the house and/or out and about. Why do these owners think it's ok to have a 30ft retractable leash who let THEIR dog led THEM from so far in front and when THEIR lap dog barks (opps I mean YAPS!) at MY Rotti who is on a short leash, by my side and does not react I'm deemed to be the one with the 'dangerous' dog?!?!?!?! Really?) in fact the ONLY dog to ever attack me was a Chihuahua so therefore these lap dog type breeds are on the very bottom of my list. In fact they don't even make any list but the problem isn't the breed......that said I'd never own one.

    3. Probably THE single most important thing I've learnt after seeing many problem horses and dogs is that the OWNER is KEY. Therefore before anyone gets stuck into me about how awesome their lap dog is and how dangerous my Rotti is I'd say the ONE BREED I DON'T LIKE IS A BAD OWNER. Much like children, pets are a product of their environment. A lack of attention, training or care can see ANY DOG turn into a bad egg (and what's really sad is it's not their fault).

    Rotti's for life or is that GOOD OWNERS of any breed for life (won't somebody think of the dogs!!!) hahaha
    I think the problems can lie with both the owner and the breeder. The breeder has a duty to breed dogs with the best temperament possible and to raise them in a well socialised environment and then pass the batten on to the new owner who need to carry on the socialisation and training. A well bred well trained dog of any breed has the capacity to be a great companion and all dogs deserve to be loved and cared for. For me there are just some breeds I would prefer not to live with such a really big dogs or really small, dogs that drool and dogs that have trouble breathing. My pick are the working sheep and cattle dogs. Intelligent, medium size and full of energy and desire to work. Having had one of my dogs nearly killed by a rotti in a completely unprovoked attack I treat them with caution lol. I do know some really nice ones though but would never own one.

  8. #288

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    I think the problems can lie with both the owner and the breeder. The breeder has a duty to breed dogs with the best temperament possible and to raise them in a well socialised environment and then pass the batten on to the new owner who need to carry on the socialisation and training. A well bred well trained dog of any breed has the capacity to be a great companion and all dogs deserve to be loved and cared for. For me there are just some breeds I would prefer not to live with such a really big dogs or really small, dogs that drool and dogs that have trouble breathing. My pick are the working sheep and cattle dogs. Intelligent, medium size and full of energy and desire to work. Having had one of my dogs nearly killed by a rotti in a completely unprovoked attack I treat them with caution lol. I do know some really nice ones though but would never own one.
    That's a fair comment and I agree....I guess along with many other ppl I think it's unfair to tarnish every dog of a particular breed because of issues related to humans (breeders OR owners) granted I have done just that in relation to Chihuahua and further more I recognise a 'problem' small dog is likely to cause less damage than a problem large dog. I guess you had your bad experience with a Rotti which isn't to be discounted and I've had bad experience with certain breeds > but again I recognise it's not the breed that is the issue in the vast majority of cases. Does that stop either of us from being wary, hell no!

    That aside, it basically sounds like we are in agreement as far as the animal itself is not really the issue, it's how us humans treat them that dictates how they end up in 99.9999% of cases. Sure you might have the odd dog in any breed who has inherited poor genes in that area but I wonder how much of that is a gene thing VS poor handling by humans.....

    Before we moved to the farm, the folks bought a Kelpie specifically for the farm. We were about 6 months off moving to the property but the Kelpie did not do so well, just TOO energetic to be kept in a suburban back yard (even with a lot of excerise, twice daily trips to the farm). Most likely a breed I'd steer clear of unless I had a requirement for that kind of dog and lived in a rural setting.

    Granted you had a bad experience with a Rotti. I've had bad experiences with small dogs/small dog syndrome (but even that I think is a result of poor owners) so I treat them with caution as you do with Rott's.....and i'm sure there's loads of ppl here who've had issues with XYZ breed and also steer clear of them. Having said that, the reason our family and I have been Rotti owners for 30+yrs is for the guarding they provide and regardless of how friendly and well trained my dog is, if the mere sight of my preferred breed is enough for ppl to think twice about breaking into my house or even just to cross the street when they see us walking well......I'm happy with that, I don't need everyone to love my dog.

    Funny story > we took our Rotti to the kids school fete over the weekend. Lots of people and lots of dogs from small to large. I could see ppl wary of my dog despite the black lab also in attendance being much bigger than our Pepper dawg....the worst dogs (OWNERS!!?!) we saw were young kids walking a SWF thing on a VERY long /retractable style leash and they did not stop the dog from wandering at all.....but at least it didn't bark or carry on. The poodle we saw however, again much larger/taller than our Rotti' was causing non stop headaches and I almost said something when the owner of said Poodle tried to stop it from barking with a very physical action of forcing the dogs mouth shut and clamping their hands over it's jaws. It didn't help, it wasn't a good display at all. Lots of ppl witnessed the incident and the dog was taken away and only after all that were ppl then coming up to us saying how sweet our 'dangerous' dog was....

    Perspective is a funny thing hey.....I'm saddened to hear of your previous unprovoked attack by a Rotti, that's really sad. Was any action taken against the dog in question?

  9. #289
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    The owner finally managed to grab his dog and quickly scarpered, not much I could do. Quite a few friends over the years have owned Rottis, some incredibly sweet and others that were quite aggressive. My friend had her toy poodle killed by one. The sweet ones I knew were like big friendly bears but I give ones that I don't know a great deal of respect until I know them better. Mind you same goes for all dogs really. Just the bigger dogs as you say can inflict more damage so they stand out in ones mind more as dogs to be wary of. Aggression is certainly not limited to specific breeds, one of my dogs was attacked by 2 Jack Russells once, lucky for them she was not inclined to be aggressive back and relied on me to fend them off with a ball thrower until the owners dealt with them, I have had the same experience with a kelpie.

    My observations over the years are that genetics can play a pretty big role in temperament. The ability to know how to handle dogs with difficult temperaments can make a big difference to the long term outcome but it is not always easy and most people don't know what to do. I had a friend breed a kelpie with a shocking temperament because she wanted her kids to experience the whole cycle of life thing. Worst possible reason for breeding. The puppies turned out just like their mother, fear aggressive temperaments that caused their new owners no end of grief. Several of them turned up at the local dog club where I was instructing for help, they were hard work.

    Yes often owners are responsible for badly behaved dogs, but breeders need a slap sometimes for breeding poor temperaments. Put both together and it can be a disaster. Or as you said choosing a high drive perhaps poorly bred working kelpie to live in the city. I live on a farm but have also had working dogs in suburbia and a well bred sheep dog most definitely is highly trainable and has an off switch. The off switch is very important because working sheepdogs have long periods of down time where they are confined. The last thing you need is a manically busy dog. I own a kelpie with the best off switch. She will be ready to work in an instant and when nothing is happening she chills out completely for weeks lol. She does come from impeccable lines.

  10. #290

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    Well written response > I totally agree, thinking about it I am actually wary of most animals and it's a wise man who gives the unknown animal a wide berth until you know better, no matter the breed or animal... I am the same with horses in fact.

    Also agree on genetics playing a role in temperament and particularly with difficult animals, it comes down to the handler/owner on knowing how to.....errrrr....handle a particular animal or issue like aggression. They certainly take a lot more work than a dog/animal without the aggressive disposition, or any number of issues animals pick up.

    I've given this particular thread more attention than it deserves. I am a new member of this community, I post a short intro thread and THE VERY FIRST thread I read is this exact thread.
    A somewhat negative spin (why not have had the thread 'Breeds you like') and the opening comment about Rotti's (typical) made me want to respond. I should have known better.

    That's all the attention I'll give this thread, for those who continue and feel the need to bag out an entire breed based on a previous bad experience under gawd knows what situation, then more power to you but I won't bother trying to explain or change your mind (particularly the OP).

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