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Thread: Kassie, the Pup with Cherry Eye

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Default Kassie, the Pup with Cherry Eye

    This is not a thread to bash you or be nasty, so anyone who has a poor opinion please stick clear.

    I was hoping you could let us know what happened to the pup with cherry eye? I've left you a few messages but I thought you may not have seen them.

    We all just want the best for this puppy and it would truly make my year if you let us know how he is.

    Hope your pup is healthy in 2010

  2. #2

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    he,s find he is in our bathroom we are keep the flys away from him he got a nice juisty bone hfor him to eat as well as dog food and water with ice cube in it he one happy puppy he is geting his eye fix in to weeks allso his coat looks good as the outer dogs

  3. #3
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    Two weeks?
    Did you go when the pup went to the vet?
    Education not Legislation

  4. #4

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    no i did not

  5. #5
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    Nov 2009
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    Melbourne, australia
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    Do you know how the vet is going to fix it Kassie? Are they going to fix it with eye drops or a little operation?

    I don't suppose your vet is Beach Street Vet Clinic? There is a vet who works there that knows EVERYTHING about Shar Pei. He would fix lots of cherry eyes
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  6. #6

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    no we use vet on the move one he come and takes the pup away fiw him up

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kassie jones View Post
    no we use vet on the move one he come and takes the pup away fiw him up
    Cool, I hope he can fix the blue boys eye very soon, but please let me know if you need my help, OK?
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  8. #8

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    i will

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
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    Would someone be able to tell me what exactly cherry eye is? I've never heard of it before o.O

  10. #10

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    What is Cherry Eye?

    Cherry eye is a common term for prolapse of the third eyelid gland. Many mammals, including dogs, have an “extra” or third eyelid located inside the lower eyelid. This serves as an additional protective layer for the eye. The third eyelid contains a gland that produces a significant portion of the tear film. When this gland prolapses or “pops out”, the condition is known as “cherry eye”.

    What are the clinical signs of “cherry eye”?
    Prolapse of the third eyelid gland appears a red swollen mass (named by its resemblance to a cherry) on the lower eyelid near the nose or muzzle. The “cherry eye” may be large and cover a significant portion of the cornea or it may be small and appear only periodically. Any sign of “cherry eye’ should be brought to your vet’s attention immediately.

    What causes “cherry eye”?
    The gland of the third eyelid is normally anchored to the lower inner rim of the eye by a fibrous attachment. In certain breeds it is thought that this attachment is weak, which allows the gland to prolapse easily. The breeds most commonly affected include Cocker Spaniels, Bulldogs, Beagles, Bloodhounds, Lhasa Apsos, Shih-Tzus, and other brachycephalic breeds (dogs with “squished” faces and short limbs).

    What is the treatment of “cherry eye”?
    Treatment involves medical therapy or surgical replacement of the third eyelid gland. It is important to treat the condition as soon as possible in order to minimize damage. This is critical because the third eyelid gland produces up to fifty percent of the watery (aqueous) portion of the tear film. Without adequate tear production, your dog is much more likely to develop “dry eye”, which can seriously impair vision. Your veterinarian will discuss the appropriate technique that will best suit your pet’s condition.

    What is the prognosis?
    In most cases, the gland returns to normal function within a few weeks of treatment. Approximately five to twenty percent of cases may experience a re-prolapse of the third eyelid gland and require additional surgery. Many pets that have a prolapse in one eye will eventually experience a prolapse in the opposite eye. Replacement of the third eyelid gland is always the first choice of treatment due to the risk of developing “dry eye” if the gland is lost. In severe or chronic cases, there may be no option other than removal of the gland, especially if the function is thought to be severely diminished or absent.

    http://www.jacobswellvetsurgery.com....8/Default.aspx

    OMG look at this poor dogs eyes, it makes me so sick & so bloody angry that irresponsible dog owners allow their dogs to suffer such horrible health conditions

    http://www.scpitrescue.org/IMG_5268.jpg
    Last edited by Aussie Floyd; 01-02-2010 at 01:47 PM.

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