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Thread: Thinking of Adopting

  1. #21
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    Judge, you will know in your heart when you truly believe it is time to relieve him of his burden, when you can see he no longer wishes to go on.

    I find this a very sensitive subject actually...how to put it?

    We are legally allowed the 'right' to choose whether our pets live or die, and if the later -when. We have that right because we believe we are acting in the best interests of the dog's happiness and well-being.

    I find it utterly amazing then why this same attitude of kindness and mercy is not equivalent for humans.

  2. #22
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    Hi DA

    The current system allows a doctor to give a dose of pain killer necessary to relieve the pain, even if s/he thinks it might also "hasten death". So that's pretty close. But usually a few months later than a patient would like if they have any say in it. Personally in my Dad's case, he'd been really clear about how and when he wanted to go, and for a while as each bit of him fell apart, he'd change his mind and set the bar a little further out. Eg at one point it was when he couldn't take himself to the toilet, and he extended that out to when he couldn't recognise or talk to us... Didn't really matter if he'd been definite and never wavered. I would never have been able to do what it took to end things for him. Even if that meant merely pressing an off switch. The whole idea was far too upsetting for me. Though I would have been quite happy to pass the buck to another person like a doctor, with the agreement of the family.

    There are things now called "living wills" that allow a person to say under what circumstances they want to refuse medical treatment (including drip feeding and artificial breathing).

    There are many reasons why *voluntary* euthanasia is not yet legal. Some are religious, ie some of our politicians believe it's a bad thing - "playing God". Some are more pragmatic, ie how do you know when it really is voluntary euthansia or for all the right reasons - or if it is really some family members don't want the ongoing hassle of dealing with a vegetable parent/child or worse - a demented one. Or they want the inheritance sooner - though if they have power of attorney - they have the money anyway.

    So while we think it isn't nice if someone pays to have their pets PTS because they find them inconvenient for some reason, it's still legal and there's not huge community outrage. But if someone does that with a human - different story. And it can get very difficult to prove what happenned one way or the other, so law makers say a blanket NO for euthansing humans.

  3. #23
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    Thank you Hyacinth.

    I appreciate that explanation and insight. I can see the huge hurdles with it, and guess it would become a field day even further than the topic is currently.

    Didn't know that about a person's will though. Will check that out.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    JTDNTB

    Have you got a dog friendly face to face friend who doesn't live with you that you could take to the vet with you?

    If they find lots of cancer - what are you going to do? What are you going to do if they don't?

    Now just to confuse you - I don't think arthritus by itself is reason to end a dog's life, neither is fitting.
    My mum is probably the best person to take to the vet with me as she is attached to Tyson but is very strong so can make herself impartial (if that makes sense?) she is practically my personal vet and has had animals her whole life.

    If they find lots of cancer I would have to get him PTS as I think it would hurt me (and him obviously) more to watch him go through pain.
    If they dont find anything I will keep getting him tested to find out what is causing the fits? - which relates to my next question

    Many people have said to me that every time he fits a part of his brain dies and that he does feel pain during the fit. Does anyone see any truth in this?
    I know some have you have already posted that they feel nothing during this short time.

  5. #25
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    I don't think that happens at all, Judge, but I'm not a vet.

  6. #26
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    something else to add to the list to ask the vet

  7. #27
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    I have nothing more I can say Judge. The only thing that comes to mind seems so piddly considering your position right now -

    This too will pass.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    I find it utterly amazing then why this same attitude of kindness and mercy is not equivalent for humans.
    I can so relate to that. I had to watch both my mother and father die long slow painful deaths 11 years ago. They died within 5.5 months of each other. It is disgusting that we allow humans to die in such a way.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I can so relate to that. I had to watch both my mother and father die long slow painful deaths 11 years ago. They died within 5.5 months of each other. It is disgusting that we allow humans to die in such a way.
    I actually agree with that comment 110%! My mother is not well, and continually begs me to make sure she is not suffering or simply being - not living.


    I have made my promise. Now somehow I must keep it one day in the future. That will be VERY difficult.

    Why oh why do I keep going off-topic. I'm sorry Judge...again.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    The current system allows a doctor to give a dose of pain killer necessary to relieve the pain, even if s/he thinks it might also "hasten death". So that's pretty close. But usually a few months later than a patient would like if they have any say in it.
    For my mother it came literally hours later thankfully. The Dr had already explained the 'unofficial' euthanasia that is practised. My mother refused all further medication on a Thursday at lunchtime. The nurses told me to convince her to allow them to administer morphine still. She died early the next morning but still, that was after several weeks of pleading with us to end it for her.

    Anyway, enough of morbid human things.

    Judge, Tyson is lucky to have you it seems. I hope he is resting a little easier tonight.

    Yes, seizures do kill brain cells but given one of my Pugs, Monte, has had in excess of 300 seizures over his life and he can still run, play and enjoy life I can't see it really hurts to lose some... I expect that the alcohol we drink does just as much damage.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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