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Thread: Thinking of Adopting

  1. #11
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    I agree with GoodiesGirl's post. No-one can tell what is the roght or worng thing to do in this situation. It is a personal thing and I am sure you will make the right decision.

    If it helps, the seizures do not hurt him at all. He feels no pain and would not even understand that he has suffered one. The seizures will put pressure on his heart though, ensure he stays cool when they happen as his body temp will elevate also. Perhaps offer him a little ice-cream after it to help restore his sugar levels, to cool him and as a treat.

    Seizures in geriatric dogs are usually caused by dieseases such as cancer.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I agree with GoodiesGirl's post. No-one can tell what is the roght or worng thing to do in this situation. It is a personal thing and I am sure you will make the right decision.

    If it helps, the seizures do not hurt him at all. He feels no pain and would not even understand that he has suffered one. The seizures will put pressure on his heart though, ensure he stays cool when they happen as his body temp will elevate also. Perhaps offer him a little ice-cream after it to help restore his sugar levels, to cool him and as a treat.

    Seizures in geriatric dogs are usually caused by dieseases such as cancer.

    The cancer is what I am afraid of

  3. #13
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    I'm sorry to hear that about poor Tyson.

    I know you will make the right decision

    Sending yours and Tysons way!
    Only a twinkle in his daddys eye ♥♡
    (IM)patiently waiting for my long awaited newfie pup ♥♡

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeTheDeedNotTheBreed View Post
    I dont know!

    I took him to the vet about a month ago because I couldnt keep the weight on him and had already changed him from mature food back to adult (more crude fat) The vet told me to put him back on puppy food again to put the weight back on.

    During the vet visit we also discussed the possibility of cancer considering his weight loss, age etc. The vet advised me to wait until I put some more weight on and then start thinking about blood tests.

    It was about 2 weeks ago that he started having the seizures (he falls on his size and starts shaking, no foaming at the mouth etc) and I have since taken him back for his bloods to be taken.

    Waiting for his blood results to come back but the vet has stated that since the seizures have started he wants to do more tests.
    ohhhh poor poor guy!!!

    I hope you find out soon what is wrong with him...I'll be thinking about you and your darling boy

  5. #15
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    thanks for the support guys

  6. #16

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    aww poor boy

    My thoughts & prayers are with you both

    Sorry i cant offer advice as to whether or not to PTS, it's personal choice that only you can make & I'm sure you will make a decision based on what's best for your dog.

  7. #17
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    My mum waited far too long before putting to sleep our heeler kelpie cross. In the end, the dog couldn't find her feed bowl, she was deaf, blind and eventually couldn't smell either, and it took her about five minutes to sit down because her joints were so sore/stiff. There was zero quality of life in the end, and a lot of pain, though she still seemed happy and pleased to be with us. Then again that dog never did know when to quit, she'd fall over before she'd stop and rest herself.

    So my rule of thumb is that if you think it's time, it's probably a month later than you needed, ie when you look back you will think you should have done it last month. Doesn't make it any easier.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    My mum waited far too long before putting to sleep our heeler kelpie cross. In the end, the dog couldn't find her feed bowl, she was deaf, blind and eventually couldn't smell either, and it took her about five minutes to sit down because her joints were so sore/stiff. There was zero quality of life in the end, and a lot of pain, though she still seemed happy and pleased to be with us. Then again that dog never did know when to quit, she'd fall over before she'd stop and rest herself.

    So my rule of thumb is that if you think it's time, it's probably a month later than you needed, ie when you look back you will think you should have done it last month. Doesn't make it any easier.
    Its funny you say this as he is going blind, deaf and has had arthritis for the past 2(?) years, he is getting slower but pick up a ball and he wont stop til he literally drops

    I don't know what to do

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeTheDeedNotTheBreed View Post
    I don't know what to do
    I dread getting to this point with my animals. I have a cat that is beginning to show her age now at 14 years. My dogs thankfully have a little longer to go although I think Monte, being an epileptic, will probably go far earlier than I would like him to.

    I don't think there is a time that can be given. I know I have read many sad threads with people in the same predicament as you. Be advised by your Vet, listen to your heart, take on board the experiences of others and I am sure you will make the right decision.

    Have you ever read 'The Art of Racing in the Rain' (I think that is what it is called)? It is a wonderful story told from the dog's perspective and his thoughts as he ages and the time comes to go to the bridge may comfort you. It could also upset you though but it is truly a wonderful piece of writing and I love the way you believe it is the dog's thoughts.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #20
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    JTDNTB

    Have you got a dog friendly face to face friend who doesn't live with you that you could take to the vet with you? Someone else might be less emotionally attached and better able to help you make a decision. It needs to be someone else you could forgive if they say it's time, and they need to be able to forgive you if you say you can't do it right now.

    You can spend a lot of money at the vet only to find out for sure that Tyson will not get better. I was thinking xrays might be a better way of finding cancers, but - again vet should know - and xrays are expensive for dogs too. If they find lots of cancer - what are you going to do? What are you going to do if they don't? I'm thinking unless they find he's swallowed a tennis ball (or something simple) and removing it will fix him all up, then an accurate diagnosis might not make any difference to what your decision is.

    Have you asked the vet if it was their dog what s/he would do? That, and taking a less emotionally attached friend along will help the vet tell you what you really don't want to hear. Otherwise some vets find it a lot easier to take all your money doing lots of (pointless) tests and temporary fix ups than deal with a potentially upset or angry owner. Some owners want to do what ever it takes to save a dog no matter what the quality of the dogs remaining life might be.

    You really need to ask the right questions and be persistant. Otherwise, unless they're the gruff direct abrupt emotionally insensitive type, they might not want to tell you what they'd be doing if it was their dog. Many vets will not volunteer this information unless you ask the direct question.

    Now just to confuse you - I don't think arthritus by itself is reason to end a dog's life, neither is fitting.

    But I do think a dog crashing into things at high speed looking for a feed bowl when it has no senses to find it, and sunbaking in the hot sun with no sense of when it's time to get back in the shade would be better off in a doggy nursing home under full supervision or PTS. I think if it was me that couldn't find or appreciate my dinner and the rest of me was falling to bits, I'd want to be PTS. I also think extensive cancer would be a good time to PTS. Unless you can get the same paliative care as humans can get (eg Morphine drip). Cancer can be extremely painful, depending what sort and where it is.

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