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Thread: Bushfires!

  1. #11
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    The Little town where we have a house in Vic was badly threatened on two incoming fronts in the Big Victorian fires. It was only Elvis..the huge water chopper that came in from America that saved it.

    A big problem too is that many NSW fireys were sent there, including hubby but they were allowed to do nothing except protecting homes, stuff drain pipes, advise as vic was in charge. Same thing happens every state others are sent to. Legally, if he was moving someone's cattle, an ember flew in, started a spot fire, he could not put it out but had to call the ones in that state. True story and partly why it is all in such a bloody mess when big fires are there. I can understand that the flat area fireys are not trained for hilly and mountain terrain, however, the legalities can be a joke.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    A big problem too is that many NSW fireys were sent there, including hubby but they were allowed to do nothing except protecting homes, stuff drain pipes, advise as vic was in charge. Same thing happens every state others are sent to. Legally, if he was moving someone's cattle, an ember flew in, started a spot fire, he could not put it out but had to call the ones in that state. True story and partly why it is all in such a bloody mess when big fires are there. I can understand that the flat area fireys are not trained for hilly and mountain terrain, however, the legalities can be a joke.
    That is ridiculous! It is bu*****t this chain of command thing when peoples lives are at risk!

  3. #13
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    That is why many fireys are reluctant to go interstate, even though they go. Here, they leave a skeleton brigade but come home saying how they could be so much more effectively used than they were. It DOES have to do with terrain they are trained on, however, the no no against putting your foot on an ember if flat trained and in mountainous
    terrain is bull crap.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    That is ridiculous! It is bu*****t this chain of command thing when peoples lives are at risk!
    This chain of command is b*shit at any time, I think. Human ego kills as many lives as the damned fire!

  5. #15
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    it is the different interstate rules and red tape that does it. Same as the back burn or not to back burn issue, same as clear undergrowth in safe times one. Habitats ruined, loss of wildlife, but then compare with catastrophic fires, homes and lives lost. I have 2 fire captains in my loungeroom, lol.
    Last edited by Di_dee1; 11-21-2009 at 07:22 PM.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #16
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    My friend's house in Canberra and a whole lot of others were saved by Elvis. But a lot of houses got burnt too.

    My country cousins - those who have been out there a long time - all have their own fire fighting trucks and water and power and radios and get trained in their local fire brigades. Their worst nightmares are things like government bureaucrats telling them they can never burn off the scrub paddocks. So wrong. Even naturally those would get burnt now and then, and if they're never burnt, any fire that does go through gets so hot everything dies instead of getting renewed.

    It's the people who have moved out there from the cities or overseas that have no clue and no fire truck and don't join their local CFS that I worry about. They put everybody's lives in peril. I know one of those too. He had a bonfire in October I think - just before the fire season started, and he put it under a gum tree next to a fence, next to a road... and part way up a very steep hill. And it made it's own wind with its heat, and it caught alight in the gum tree, and quite a few others, and burnt the fence and headed off across the road to his neighbour's place. And this person had NO fire fighting equipment except for us horrified people that he had invited to his party.

    We did manage to put the fire out, he ended up loading sulo bins onto a ute and filling them up with water to put the bonfire out. And lucky for us the gum trees were green and well watered enough not to keep burning. He sort of learned something. But as hobby farmers go - he did a lot of things that put his life in peril.

  7. #17

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    WOW.. interesting read... an eye opener really.... I have lived through fire and lived in the bush alot of my life yet do not get the same sentiments on this topic as alot of you!
    Of course i have a plan, i have children and would not hesitate to go somewhere safe in an instant!
    I was really asking about it in relation to my dogs.... if i couldnt get back to them... fires can and DO come very fast and sometimes there is no warning! My dear friend left her house in Feb while her loungeroom was on fire and 5 mins earlier she didnt even know there was a fire!
    Would i be able to get back to my dogs? Who knows... I am hoping no one has to be in this situation at all this summer!!!

  8. #18
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    Hi KelpieMum

    You'd have to take the dogs with you. Or board them in town or something. And there's a lot of days rated severe or worse. And there may or may not be a fire on those days.

    I want to go visit my sister in Perth in December maybe or January, fire season anyway. And I would need to board my dog somewhere. And my favourite boarding places are all in the Adelaide hills - ie high fire risk. There are a couple of places on the flat, but the risk of getting kennel cough (and other things) is much higher in those places because they also do rescues.

    Still Kennel Cough is not as scary as burnt to death.

  9. #19

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    Yeah your right.... i will try keep my dogs with me.... haven't really got anywhere they can go except with me and i guess i worry about them being in the car on these hot days.. (don't worry i wouldnt leave them in a locked up car)
    I am a stay at home Mum so its not as though they are left home on there own for long anyway.. they are very lucky dogs in that regard!!

    Thanks Hyacinth...What do you think your boarding kennel would do if they came under fire threat?

  10. #20

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    Health authorities are reminding people to drink plenty of water and stay out of the heat is possible, while the RSPCA has urged pet owners to take extra precautions also.

    "Owners need to ensure their pets are kept safe, cool and hydrated to avoid a cruel death," RSPCA chief veterinarian Magdoline Awad said in a statement

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