Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Dogs and Heeling...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

    Default Dogs and Heeling...

    I am amazed at the amount of people I see out and about walking dogs who are a horror on the leash.

    I realise there are many scenarios of why this may be; take Zed for example. A dog who came to us as an adult; never trained to 'heel'; so therefore needed to be taught how.

    But it's just that it has been years since I've seen a dog out in the general public going for a walk with it's owner who has not been pulling, tugging, lunging, playing up etc etc...

    Why is this? The first thing any young puppy should learn when being purchased as a family pet/companion dog is how to heel nicely:

    * Dog's shoulder perfectly aligned with your left thigh.
    * Lead loose and held across the front of your body into your right hand.
    * Dog knows to stop when you stop and preferably to sit immediately you've halted, particularly at crossings and kerbs.
    * Dog knows to turn with you, left, right, in perfect unison with owner.

    So is it just me and what I'm seeing, or are others noticing a massive decline in dogs who are trained to heel correctly?

  2. #2

    Default

    My dog Keeda is like this with my mom. She knows how to heel, my mom simply doesn't establish her authority and Keeda doesn't respect her. She loves her, but doesn't respect her. When I walk Keeda or run with Keeda she is expected to maintain the following:

    - Walk on my right hand side, aligned with my shoulder/hip.
    - Her paws not to go in front of my toes.
    - Turn with me
    - Stop and sit when I stop

    She does this on and off leash. Sometimes I give her correctional commands like 'slower', 'faster', or 'closer', but walking isn't a problem for us anymore.

    But yeah, just as a note - just because a dog lookd like a horrible walker with one person doesn't mean that it isn't trained to walk properly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Perth, WA
    Posts
    1,257

    Default

    I see it all the time too DA. I think god, that does NOT look enjoyable. Talk about 'who's taking who for a walk?!!'

    There is no way in hell I would put up with being pulled down the street. Taya does walk in the heel position, though a little more in front than she should be. But I don't mind, as long as she's not right in front. When I get my puppy it will be taught to heel straight up.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Brisbane Queensland Australia
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Diesel is great on the lead it's the new addition we are working on. Boy lots of work to be done there.

    We took the dogs to the very empty dog park this morning and we walked which is about a 20min walk but the majority of the time she was pulling on the lead. After a few checks with the cc she came good and was very much improved on the way home. But i have a feeling we'll have to start over again tomorrow. She is trying and having taken the walk with Diesel in the lead didn't help so over all she did OK. She;'s got the sitting down pat though lol.
    1 Siberian Husky Diesel
    1 Belgian Malinois Gypsy
    1 Kitty Porsche

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Near Newcastle, NSW
    Posts
    4,215

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    I am amazed at the amount of people I see out and about walking dogs who are a horror on the leash.

    I realise there are many scenarios of why this may be; take Zed for example. A dog who came to us as an adult; never trained to 'heel'; so therefore needed to be taught how.

    But it's just that it has been years since I've seen a dog out in the general public going for a walk with it's owner who has not been pulling, tugging, lunging, playing up etc etc...

    Why is this? The first thing any young puppy should learn when being purchased as a family pet/companion dog is how to heel nicely:

    * Dog's shoulder perfectly aligned with your left thigh.
    * Lead loose and held across the front of your body into your right hand.
    * Dog knows to stop when you stop and preferably to sit immediately you've halted, particularly at crossings and kerbs.
    * Dog knows to turn with you, left, right, in perfect unison with owner.

    So is it just me and what I'm seeing, or are others noticing a massive decline in dogs who are trained to heel correctly?
    I am SO guilty of this! And now I pay the price with a 20 kg Staffy, who is extremely powerful. He is getting better though. We made the mistake of putting a harness on him when he was little because it looked "cute". It just taught him to pull us even further down the street like sleigh dogs.

    It is a fine line...when you have a dog that is being used for show (which he isn't any more)...they need to walk different in the ring...show their drive and leg movements in full running mode. You can see the confusion in Ruby's face when we are walking and when we are show training. It is like...but last you said mum?????

    I have hereby commited myself to do more training...for mine and my dogs benefit

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Frosty does a lovely heel, at dog class, on the ovals, in the back yard on and off lead. But on the footpaths, not interested - unless I put the sensible on her and insist. We do stop and sit at road crossings though.

    I've always seen people out with their dogs taking them for a walk.

    I met a rather nasty rottweiler this morning with a deluded owner. He says "Oh my dog is just playing and a bit boisterous". Frosty was doing all the right things. She lay on her back with her paws in the air and ignored all the barking and lunging by this rotty. And then it lunged and bit her foot and made her scream. Game? over. Friendly NOT.

    I learned something. When a dog is behaving like that, don't try to help - walk away. The rotty owner wanted to check Frosty's foot - no permanent damage or blood that I could tell, though she did limp for a while. And he wanted to bring the Rotty with him. I said no, could he please keep his dog away.

    I don't know if you can teach a Rotty to play nice when it's already huge.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Formally Warrandyte, now Windsor VIC
    Posts
    123

    Default

    I agree!! I see sooo many people who are walking dogs around the city ( so a populated area, full lots of kids, cars, non dog people and dangers) and seem to have no concept of 'heel.' I'd say 90% in my area. It frustrates me when I have put so much time teaching my dog and not greet other dogs unless he is given permission when other people approach me with their dogs dragging them around, and the dog goes straight up to George's face.

    I was in the onleash part of Albert Park the other day with George heeling, when another women's off leash dog ran straight up to my dog and started sniffing his face. Then the woman had the taunacity to YELL at me demanding "is your dog aggressive?"!! I couldn't believe it!

    I understand dogs are sociable animals and love nothing more than to say hello to each other, but it is up to their owners to have control of them in this human-centric world full of dangers and people all to eager to point the finger at dogs.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

    Default

    Ok, so obviously I'm not the only one noticing this wherever I go.

    What has happened to society training their puppies then? That must be where it all stems from surely?

    Jeez, that would have p****ed me off to no end Newfienut. What is wrong with these idiots? Oops, just answered my own question - they are idiots, or at the very least ignorant.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    I swear when my family were going to dog class with our pooches in the 1980's, while there were a lot of people and dogs there, we were the odd ones out among our friends. None of them had a clue.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

    Default

    So by that, Hyacinth, I would say the education side of it was lacking significantly?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •