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Thread: How Do We All Judge Breeders?

  1. #1
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    Default How Do We All Judge Breeders?

    Here's a thread I thought would be interesting, and probably informative for me right now.

    In my time I've met breeders who live in homes that are really unkempt, yet you realise it may be because all their time, effort and money is put into their dogs.

    I've also met breeders who were obviously filthy rich and looked down their nose at prospective buyers if they weren't in their monetary and social league. Pfft.

    Hey, I've also seen it the other way around too.
    Messy homes, messy yards, messy dogs, .
    Rich homes, rich breeders, perfect dogs, .

    Does anyone ever feel that as a prospective buyer or seller of animals they are being judged on their appearance, residence, occupation etc etc...???

  2. #2
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    Hi DA

    Well AWL and RSPCA wanted to know I had a big back yard, didn't mind it being dug up, and had enough time to walk a dog between 1 to 2 hours - in two sessions. They didn't check though. And they didn't care how much money I had or which suburb I lived in or who my parents were (gotta love Adelaide).

    If I was choosing a breeder, first I'd choose a breed, then I'd go to their club meetings and as many shows as I could and meet as many dogs from different breeders. I'd lean towards breeders who have friendly dogs who were interested in me and would do any basic obedience a little bit (does this dog have a brain, can it focus on me or is it completely distracted?). I'd also lean towards breeders who said things that suggested they care about their dogs and where they go. Policies about returns, I'd want to see in writing though, along with any promise I really cared about like testing for good genes.

    I'd also choose a breeder that wasn't obsessed with showing (or winning shows). I'd be happy with a puppy from dogs that may or may not show, and ones that place but don't win would be ok. And I'd prefer a breed that the standard includes behavioural and temperment traits over beauty / appearance traits. Though I'd be happy with a blotchy dalmation - so long as it demonstrated it was friendly and had a bit of a brain.

    Dog star has a bit about choosing...
    How to Select a Good Breeder | Dog Star Daily

    I'd also verify what the breeder was saying with independent sources not ones recommended by the breeder - though I'd also like to talk to other owners of dogs from that breeder - not always so easy to do or important.

    And I'd avoid breeders that bitch constantly about other breeders. I'd prefer ones that focus on what they have to offer, not on why I shouldn't talk to some other breeder.

    In the meantime - I would check the rescues/pounds to see if they have dogs that I like. Note: the best dogs (mostly puppies) never make it to their websites.

  3. #3
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    Hey DA,

    Really good thread .. and I may go a bit off track here (sorry). I think the whole personal judgment issues comes up in life everyday. The car you drive, the house you own, the toys your kids play with, the school they attend .. and that's before you even get to the issue of what breed of dog you own or how you raise it. It's crazy and very disappointing in my eyes. I wish we could all live alongside one another with no other consideration then the person you are - the qualities you display as a person, the qualities that make you a good person and someone who endears others around you .. and not because of you may look or sound. Yeah I know, a bit idealistic and not very realistic ...

    I guess for breeders and/or dog owners, there are certain things that you do look for which sometimes might sway your opinion in relation to their suitability with regards to breeder ship or ownership .. hygiene, safety, love and overall care that is provided .. I guess that's all I look at when I am in this situation. Whether they drive a Datto 200B or a Mercedes, doesn't really mean a thing to me. I'm willing to overlook or not even look at most things, unless they have a bearing on the pooches birthing or development to what I consider as only the best!

    Kind regards,
    SH, Lola n' Zep
    Ps .. no offence to Datto drivers, I spent many an hour behind a Datto 200B, so i felt justified to use that as a joke in conversation.

  4. #4
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    I too would go by looking at their set up, though they may, like some bird breeders have closed set ups due to potential disease that WE may potentially bring in. I feel that that though, whilst a good idea can also maybe turn a buyer off.
    Reputation, word of mouth, and how I feel they feel with their dogs, would be important to me along with policies they have and the KNOWLEDGE of their breed.

  5. #5
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    Before I bought my first Pug I joined the Pug Club of Victoria. I went to shows, talked to the breeders and finally ordered a pup from a breeder in SA. At that time there were no breeders of blacks in Vic. I waited almost a year for my pup but she was well worth waiting for.

    I did exactly the same thing with Deerhounds. I joined the club when I rescued my first Deerhound from the pound. By the time I was ready for my first pedigree pup I knew the different breeders and bloodlines and had already made friends with the breeder I intended to buy from.

    I would never buy a pup from someone just starting out in a breed unless they had an experienced mentor. Many newbies think they know it all in the first five minutes and I prefer a breeder who really does know their breed.

    I would never buy a pup raised in a kennel. The pups and their relatives should be part of the family.

    With my first pedigree Deerhound (ordered before the mating) I was invited to look at the pups when they were two weeks old. I visited the litter every week until the pup came home at 8 weeks.

    It's very important to meet all the breeder's dogs and see how they are housed. You can also observe their temperaments. Not just mum but Auntie Sasha and Uncle Rex as well.

    A good breeder genuinely loves their dogs. Not all do.

    A good breeder never has to advertise. Pups are usually booked before the mating even takes place.

    If the breeder knows their stuff and produces sound, healthy, long lived dogs with good temperaments then it shouldn't matter if they are rich or poor, fat or thin or whatever. You are buying a dog not looking for a potential partner.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhound View Post

    I would never buy a pup raised in a kennel. The pups and their relatives should be part of the family.
    Are there exceptions too this rule?
    Education not Legislation

  7. #7
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    What about country farming dogs?
    Or are we just talking pedigree pups?
    Wait, who said anyhting about 50 dogs?
    Education not Legislation

  8. #8
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    Yeah I was surprised to find out pigs, chickens and dogs can't actually talk
    Education not Legislation

  9. #9
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    When choosing our pup we viewed websites, sent emails and made phonecalls. When we spoke to the reg. breeder we got Troopa from it just felt right. They gave us alot of information, kept in contact with us the whole way through the pregnancy. The male breeder is a cop which just so happened to be what my husband was in training for at the time. 2 of my husbands cousins (also cops) knew him from work and gave high recommendations and told us how much he cared for his dogs (even took time off work when one of his bitches died).
    We were introduced to a few of their dogs, all so lovely and friendly.


    Our pup came with:
    Certificate of Registration (Pedigree Papers)

    Extensive Puppy Care and Information Pack

    Five Generation Pedigrees of Puppy, Father and Mother

    Puppies have been vaccinated, tattooed and subjected to routine worming

    Puppy Pack courtesy of Pro Plan

    Six (6) week insurance courtesy of Pet Plan

    Life time support and interest for the life of your puppy


    They've asked us to keep them updated on how he's doing and to let them know if we have any problems.

  10. #10
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    Well, Southern Harmony has certainly picked up where I was coming from!

    Perhaps I shouldn't have just used the word 'breeder' in the title? Later on I went on to elaborate by saying 'buyers and sellers', so I kind of mean all.

    I felt this thread would be interesting as this forum is for purebreeds AND crossbreeds. I have never owned a cross-breed, and have usually always bought my dogs from reputable breeders, which have come to me registered with full pedigree. There was one exception - a GSD bitch who was purebred. Thing is, she was my one true heart dog up till now, the best, healthiest and soundest animal I have ever encountered in my life.

    Looking around the internet at ppl with puppies for sale, for the first time ever I'm beginning to question the 'reputable breeder has the best, soundest stock' belief.

    What do others think?

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