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Thread: Today It Happened to Us...... Dog Bite.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop
    I dont know .
    Maybe .

    Placing teeth on a child no matter the reason is just not tolerated.
    Why was your 3 year old brother able to be near the dog whilst it was eating in the first place?

    In this case the dog has reacted aggressively for what ? And you have suggested to try and keep them seperate or teach the toddler not to go near the dog. That is hardly safe. Next time it might be his eye.....or his life.
    He was able to because I was around the other side of the yard, cleaning up after said messy dog, and I didn't know my brother had come outside. Since then (this happened some 16ish months ago), Kye (my brother) has learnt not to touch Leo while he is eating. He understands, don't go near Leo while he's eating because he doesn't like it (something I was taught when I was little). The only times he (or myself) would ever get a nip is during play when the dog has accidentally missed the toy we're playing with.

    Are you asking (re the bold) for my case or the OPs? As for my suggestion, I meant for a temporary measure until the child is older and understands. There's no reason why this dog and child cannot live together if the child understands that the dog does not want to touched.

    Can I ask why though, you seem to put more emphasis on a child being bitten over an adult (you may not, it just sounds this way)?

  2. #32

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    Pugger ; of course we dont know the history of rescue dogs from pounds etc....but the minute one of them place teeth on a person then itstime for thier wings.

    Ozey ; Sorry but nope. I couldn't and would not take that chance around my children.It makes my blood run cold just thinking about it.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  3. #33
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    My ex-husband's nephew has a face that is scarred for life from a GSD. His mother had taken her children to visit her friend (who owned the dog) and while both mothers were having coffee in the kitchen the kids went into the back yard to play. They saw a 'funny shaped stick' and bend down to pick it up and throw it to each other and the dog. Yep, you guessed it - the stick was a mangled bone. The dog snapped at the child's face. A handsome boy gone forever. Some may say that the children should not have tried to pick up the bone. I can't agree with that. Ever.

    I do not know what happened to that dog years ago. I can only hope that it was euthanised immediately. I also do not believe the size of the dog should make any difference, but a ruddy big Shepherd could maim or even kill very quickly if it chose to.

  4. #34
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    Thankyou all for your replies. I don't think that rehoming him is an option, I couldn't live with myself if he bit someone else and no matter how much that you tell people about the dog they still think "oh no he couldn't".

    He hasn't always been this way, we got him as a tiny pup, he was well socialised with people, never picked up by strangers, I am a firm believer that even though he is a small dog he shouldn't be treated like a toy. He used to be taken to markets (on leash), to the beach, out on walks, in the car (didn't like it but went anyway). All of his behavioural problems started when our old dog died two years ago. I called it aggression but I am probably wrong. He seems to react more out of fear than anything else, he shakes, then growls then bites.

    The Stafford we had kept him well under control, if you remember the cartoon of the bulldog and the little dog "Alfie your my hero cause your so brave and strong" our little dog's Alfie died and I don't think he really knows what to do anymore.

  5. #35
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    Just a rehome story. After my stepfather died 20 years ago, my mother went to the pound and got this horrible Australian terrier. She was warned about all his aggression, but he came to her when she was there. She lived alone and her way of keeping him from biting anyone who came to the door was to open it, stand back, the dog in her arms with her hand gently in its mouth. We all hated it, lol. He was in his "own" room when she had visitors or a combination of out the backyard or room with our sleepovers. I think the challenge of him, the stimulation he provided kept her going.

    These situations can and do happen for the benefit of both.
    Last edited by Di_dee1; 10-28-2009 at 07:01 PM. Reason: can't spell or punctuate.

  6. #36

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    Oh and I don't put emphasis on children?
    I dont believe a dog has the right to place teeth on ANYONE at all.
    But think about , a dog can do much more damage to children.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowgirl View Post
    Thankyou all for your replies. I don't think that rehoming him is an option, I couldn't live with myself if he bit someone else and no matter how much that you tell people about the dog they still think "oh no he couldn't".

    He hasn't always been this way, we got him as a tiny pup, he was well socialised with people, never picked up by strangers, I am a firm believer that even though he is a small dog he shouldn't be treated like a toy. He used to be taken to markets (on leash), to the beach, out on walks, in the car (didn't like it but went anyway). All of his behavioural problems started when our old dog died two years ago. I called it aggression but I am probably wrong. He seems to react more out of fear than anything else, he shakes, then growls then bites.

    The Stafford we had kept him well under control, if you remember the cartoon of the bulldog and the little dog "Alfie your my hero cause your so brave and strong" our little dog's Alfie died and I don't think he really knows what to do anymore.
    I feel gutted for you that this has happened but I alsofeel relieved that you are taking the responsible road and making sure it wont happen again to anyone.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  8. #38
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    Cowgirl, obviously there are those here who agree with your husband (not the shooting bit, though) and believe you should euthanise the dog. There are those here who believe that rehoming is the best option, and have given their reasons why.

    In the end, none of it matters. You need to do what you feel is the right thing.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Cowgirl, obviously there are those here who agree with your husband (not the shooting bit, though) and believe you should euthanise the dog. There are those here who believe that rehoming is the best option, and have given their reasons why.

    In the end, none of it matters. You need to do what you feel is the right thing.

    Exactly, and my thoughts are with you.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop
    But think about , a dog can do much more damage to children.
    I realise this. I just asked out of curiosity

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