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Thread: Meet the Maltese Terror!

  1. #1
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    Default Meet the Maltese Terror!

    Meet the maltese terror
    The Sunday Telegraph
    October 25, 2009 09:45am
    IT may look like a harmless little lapdog but the maltese terrier has joined the ranks of some of New South Wales' most dangerous breeds of attacking canines.
    The NSW Government has listed the diminutive pet on the Department of Local Government's dog-attack register. The maltese came in at number 19 after being involved in 12 attacks between July and September this year, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

    It is the first time the breed has made the top 20 list of attacking breeds since the register was set up at the start of the year. The terrier joins breeds such as the staffordshire bull terrier, which topped the list with 116 attacks and the Australian cattle dog with 56.

    Others to make the top 20 included the german shepherd with 55 attacks, the american staffordshire terrier (45) and the rottweiler (43). The only other small dog to make the list was the jack russell terrier with 21 recorded incidents.

    State Local Government Minister Barbara Perry said the listing of the terrier proved all dogs had the potential to attack.
    "The fact that dogs of this popular breed are involved in attacks brings home the message that dog owners must keep their pets under control at all times," she said.

    Under NSW laws, councils must report dog attacks to the State Government within 72 hours of the incident. The figures showed the number of dog attacks in NSW to have risen, with 823 incidents reported by councils during the quarter.

    In the previous quarter, there were 774 attacks.

    At least 16 people were hospitalised after a dog attack, with a further 126 requiring medical treatment.

    Children were the subject of 108 attacks.
    Related Coverage
    • Maltese terriers 'dangerous dogs'Courier Mail, 25 Oct 2009
    • Councils given licence to kill stray dogsNEWS.com.au, 20 Oct 2009
    • Breed bans are not the way to goHerald Sun, 20 Oct 2009
    • New call to ban pit bull terriersAdelaide Now, 19 Oct 2009
    • Reader's Comments: 'Frenzied' pit bull attacks man, kills dogsNEWS.com.au,
    (Read More)

  2. #2

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    Pity media can't even get the very basics right... There's no such breed as a Maltese Terrier






    Plus anything small, fluffy and white will be labelled Maltese, just like anything large, shortfaced and shorthaired will be a pitbull... sigh...

  3. #3
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    Doesn't suprise me at all. There is so much focus on 'dangerous dogs' at the moment and this is a good attention grabbing story.

    I am however suprised that the Maltese attacks have actually been reported. I often encounter small dogs that are aggressive towards my boy out on walks but it seems lots of owners just laugh and don't see it as being of concern seeing as there's little to no chance a little dog will hurt my big Newfie. If my dog carried on half as much as many of these dogs did it would be a totally different story!

    I must admit it is a relief to see a change in the finger pointing towards certain breeds of dogs being deemed 'dangerous'- it is not the breed that makes a dog dangerous, it is training, upbringing, socialization and the commonsense of the owner that determine a dog's likelihood to be 'dangerous.'

  4. #4
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    Pit bull breed bans are not the way to go
    Letter to the Herald Sun

    I AM a grandmother in my 60s and have been around American pit bull terriers since 1991. I have owned, bred, judged and rescued this breed since then.

    In 2006, my then three-year-old grandson, Jayden, whom I love dearly, came to live with us. Jayden is now seven and his best mate, Buster, is a 14-year-old purebred American pit bull terrier.

    To Jayden, Buster is simply his friend, his companion and his playmate. Every night, he curls up in bed with Buster to read him a bedtime story.
    Buster is one of hundreds of thousands of American pit bulls who are faithful companions and friends to families. They show no sign of aggression - in fact, they are specifically bred not to show aggression to humans.

    As a dog lover of all breeds, I feel for all the people involved who lost their beloved four-legged friends in the incident at Arundel St, Reservoir, on Sunday night.

    Any dog, if painted black enough for long enough, will become the "devil" dog. History is full of examples of this style of paranoia. In the '60s and '70s here in Australia, the "devil" dog was the alsatian or german shepherd. In the '80s it was the English bull terrier.

    It harks back to 16th-century Europe, when everybody "knew" that all misfortune was caused by witches, who were guilty simply by virtue of being suspected.

    In the current age, which requires reason and evidence as a basis of belief, this superstition is seen as ridiculous.

    Breed bans are ineffective as a means of reducing dog attacks. While banning a breed may seem an easy solution to dog bites, the reality is far more dangerous.

    There has been no proven reduction in dog bites subsequent to bans of this type being implemented and in fact exactly the opposite has been proved.
    Government figures show that focusing on a narrow group of owners of virtually one breed or type will not provide any immunity from dog bites in the community.

    Any dog with teeth is capable of biting.

    Identifying dangerous dogs by breed and applying penalties in a blanket breed-based approach not only misses the central issues of dog problems but punishes responsible owners along with irresponsible owners.
    Breed bans do not address the recurrent patterns of irresponsible or uneducated dog ownership associated with dog attacks.

    Measures need to address human ownership practices, as dogs of many breeds and crosses appear in dog attack statistics.

    In addition, the accurate identification of a dog's breed is problematic. With the absence of documented breeding history, and particularly for ordinary cross-bred domestic pets, the task of breed identification to any level of certainty or reliability is simply not possible.

    Many dogs reported as "pit bulls" are not.

    It is now time that the problem of dogs biting is better addressed by education and ensuring the non-breed-specific existing laws pertaining to dog containment and control are more rigorously enforced, and harsher penalties applied to owners who know their dogs are unstable or whose dogs are repeat offenders.

    Bonnie Norton is secretary of the American Pit Bull Terrier Club of Australia

  5. #5
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    Whilst out jogging, my daughter was attacked by a CAT. Yes, a CAT.
    It was sitting in the driveway and as she jogged past the house, it pounced on her, bit her legs and scratched her!
    She came home covered in blood. She didn't report it to the council. Unlike a dog, you cannot train (at least I don't think so) a cat not to bite. And I have known several that bite!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi1 View Post
    Whilst out jogging, my daughter was attacked by a CAT. Yes, a CAT.
    It was sitting in the driveway and as she jogged past the house, it pounced on her, bit her legs and scratched her!
    She came home covered in blood. She didn't report it to the council. Unlike a dog, you cannot train (at least I don't think so) a cat not to bite. And I have known several that bite!
    We used to have a cat that would attack ppl walking their little dogs past the house. EEEK

  7. #7
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    Yea, my skitso cat Smokie who can be wonderful one moment and make you bleed the next is a good example of that. Funny how at night, cuddled up under my chin purring, that all bets are off then till the following day.

  8. #8

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    All this talk about dangerous dogs....funny none of these articles comment on the irresponsible owners who allow their dogs to act the way they do. I don't doubt that some dogs may have a tendency to be more aggressive than others, just as some people are but you can't taint a whole breed because of a few bad apples....just like you can't taint a whole nation of peoples because a few nutbags....
    Vellela

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vellela View Post
    All this talk about dangerous dogs....funny none of these articles comment on the irresponsible owners who allow their dogs to act the way they do. I don't doubt that some dogs may have a tendency to be more aggressive than others, just as some people are but you can't taint a whole breed because of a few bad apples....just like you can't taint a whole nation of peoples because a few nutbags....
    Exactly

    Di_Dee..the olod ginger cat I have atm is a sour puss. He'll suck up for a pat, then as soon as you get up to walk away, he bites....arghhhhhhh LOL

  10. #10
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    I used to be attacked around the ankles by my housemate's cat who thought this was a great game. He lost interest when I started wearing knee high gumboots to breakfast. This was the same cat I trained not to get on the ironing board - by throwing handfuls of pegs at him, usually from around the door so he didn't see me coming.

    This cat also caused nightmares for my housemate's boyfriend(s). That's my bed not yours...purrgrrr

    Cats can be trained. It just requires a different more creative technique than for dogs.

    I haven't heard recently of any cats killing any people or children or dogs though. They kill lots of other things I wish they wouldn't.

    PS if anyone wants to read the reports, they're here.
    http://www.dlg.nsw.gov.au/dlg/dlghom...e=8&mi=9&ml=10

    Finally the council dog attack report forms are being aggregated.

    Cattle dog #3 and Staffy #2, and Bitza (unknown cross breed) for that three months July to Sept 09.
    There doesn't seem to be the % of registered breed like there is in the big 04/05 report. Maybe I should have another quick look. Ie Staffy might be the most popular dog in NSW at the moment and it might be 0.001% of (Registered?) staffies that bite.

    Please excuse length of link.
    edited staffy to number 2... look - spoodles are serious attack dogs...
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 10-27-2009 at 02:37 PM. Reason: added the local govt link for dog attack reports.

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