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Thread: Snow Dogs in the Tropics

  1. #1
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    Oct 2009
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    Default Snow Dogs in the Tropics

    Sorry to use the term snow dogs, I know its a generalisation. Just wanted some opinions on people who choose dogs such as Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Huskie ect while living in a tropical, high humidity area. Would like to hear from owners in this situation. I see people regulary walking these breeds in the middle of the day around Cairns. Makes me feel sorry for the dog, I know that any dog should not be walked in the heat of the day & I wonder why the owners choose to do this. While working as a vet nurse my wife had a dog come into a Sydney clinic suffering from heat exhaustion & die on the floor before anything could be done for the poor thing, the vet was beside himself at the stupdity of the owner of the dog. Makes me wonder where the minds of these people are at!!

  2. #2

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    I wouldn't have any cold climate dog out and about in a subtropical climate. Even my dogs struggle if they exercise strenuously during warm days here already (Canberra) and it's only about 26 degrees with very low humidity. And they don't have the heavy double coat of the snow/spitz types that I think you mean Mal - huskies, mals and samoyeds etc??

    My guys do have amazingly cold - resistant coats though. I guess coming from Russia they'd have to!

    I think if you wanted colder climate dogs up north you'd have to have them in aircon or somewhere cool and ventilated at the very least in the daytimes, and keep them inactive. Night times up there are not much cooler are they? So exercising could be difficult! Maybe a treadmill indoors for really warm nights??

  3. #3
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    Feb 2009
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    Metung
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    Totally agree,
    have two sibes myself in vic, it is hot enough down here for them! I don't know how in the northern states how they would cope with the humidity........my boys have access to ponds[which once housed koi] lol
    so even on our hottest days they are able to cool their little feet. Also we are only a short walk from a secluded beach so if walking the boys we ultimately end up on the beach for a play.
    Will be interested also in how people and their dogs cope in such a different heat with certain breeds.

  4. #4
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    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    They're like sheep.

    Cool air gets trapped close to the skin when its hot, warm air gets trapped close to the skin when its cold.
    Education not Legislation

  5. #5
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    Sep 2009
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    melbourne
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    i think its cruel keeping dogs designed for cold climates in hot climates im even worried about my shep coping in the summer and so have brought an above ground pool for her to cool off in and im in Vic!!

  6. #6
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    Rural NSW
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    I wouldn't have them. It gets 40-45c here in summer quite regularly. It is, for me, when choosing a dog, a mix of tailoring the breed to the climate, living environment, family needs and the type of dog to suit it all, both for dog and us.

  7. #7
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    Formally Warrandyte, now Windsor VIC
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    It was my Newfie's first summer last summer and it knocked him around a little bit. I filled a half shell with ice and he'd lie in it, and we went for swims in the river every morning (which was great exercise). I also have his belly clipped so when he lies down on cool concrete he can cool off a bit. I'm lucky that being a Newfie, he's not very active and lies around all day anyway so it's not difficult to keep him in an air conditioned room in the house Another good trick is to freeze an icecream container full of water with a few schmackos in it- it keeps them amused (and cool) for hours!

  8. #8
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    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    They're like sheep.

    Cool air gets trapped close to the skin when its hot, warm air gets trapped close to the skin when its cold.
    Hah! Who told you that, & if so why do they suffer heat stroke more than other breeds? I know several vets who agree with me on that. Sheep? I honestly dont mean to offend you but that statement is a bit silly. These breeds do not handle heat as well as other breeds, I thought anyone who worked with dogs knew that, its basic knowledge, its one of the first things I had drummed into me when I first started training in Sydney.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by laura77 View Post
    i think its cruel keeping dogs designed for cold climates in hot climates im even worried about my shep coping in the summer and so have brought an above ground pool for her to cool off in and im in Vic!!
    My girl was bred in Tumbarrumba in sthn NSW & my boy was born in Belgum & they dont like the heat in the middle of the day up here. They only start to play just after dark or very early in the morning. There is no way I"d work them in the heat though.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Sunshine Coast, Qld
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    Jenna's coat is more like a Retriever's than a Samoyed's which I am very gratetful for. They said that's why they cross the 2 dogs, but I know now that nothing is guaranteed when breeding crosses. Just being a long haired dog, though, I will still worry about the heat of summer. At least she is white. Basically if it's too hot for me to go out then I figure it's too hot for Jenna and the air con goes on.

    We are lucky, though, as we don't tend to get the extremes here on the Sunny Coast. Mind you, I've only been here 3 years and I know the summer before we got here (from the UK) was a scorcher.

    I like the idea of freezing water + treats in an ice cream tub, I will give that a go.

    When we had a bit of a winter heatwave recently 30+ degrees IN WINTER I did try putting ice cubes in her water but it really put her off drinking. I just make sure I change her water plenty of times a day to make sure it's cool, and any walks are first thing in the morning or evening (as much for me as Jenna)
    The best things in life, aren't things

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