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Thread: Why Do Labradors Nose Change Colour?

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    Default Why Do Labradors Nose Change Colour?

    Ok...I have a question. Why is it that a Labrador's nose turns a pinky colour? It was black but is now changing colour.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paw-Sha View Post
    Ok...I have a question. Why is it that a Labrador's nose turns a pinky colour? It was black but is now changing colour.
    It's just the way they are. If it's chocholate or cream lab it's just something that happens sometimes to certain dogs especially in winter. or black? If it's black then it could be an autoimune desease called discoid lupus, but you should really check for this at your vet.

  3. #3

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    Thanks Fedra, I was just curious.....your answer has helped! I am sure it is not a desease she has, just found it facinating to see it change colour. Pretty cool stuff!

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    Providing the nose looks healthy ,Its called winter nose or snow nose and is supposed to be due to lack of summer sun or vitamin D. Google it and have a read. Discoid lupus is an entirely different thing and the nose looks dry and unhealthy with cracking at the nostrils. If bad and not attended to these cracks can bleed profusely . Treatment is with cortisone and keeping the dog out of the (UV) sun as much as possible.

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    1) Dudley nose -- loss of pigment seen in a number of breeds for unknown reasons in which the nose is black when dogs are young but fades to brown or sometimes even white as the dog ages.

    2) A transient form of the above condition may exist or it may be something else, but some dogs do lose some pigment and then recover the normal coloring of their nose over time.

    3) Labradors, Golden retrievers, Bernese Mountain dogs and Siberian huskies may have seasonal variation in the color of the nasal planum, usually lighter in the winter and darker in the summer. The cause of this is not known, either. Some vets refer to this as "snow nose".

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    Discoid Lupus

    The disease normally starts as loss of pigment around the nose. There may be scabby sores or just scaling of the nasal tissue. The surface of the nose may change from its typical cobblestoned appearance to a smooth surface. As this disease progresses it can cause deep sores on the borders of the nose where it meets normal skin and the sores start to progress up the bridge of the nose. Some dogs seem to be really bothered by this condition and others show little reaction to the sores.

    Ultraviolet light seems to make the sores worse, so the disease may appear to be seasonal. It is more common in areas in which exposure to ultraviolet light is increased, such as high altitudes. If the depigmentation leads to sunburn, squamous cell carcinoma becomes more likely than in other dogs. Topical sunscreens can be very beneficial, although it is hard to get dogs to leave them on. Keeping the dog in during the peak sunlight hours is probably the most effective way to prevent excessive exposure to UV light.

    Treatment depends on the severity of the disease. In many cases, topical treatment will be all that is necessary, using a corticosteroid ointment (Panalog, Synalar and others). It is usually necessary to use a fairly potent corticosteroid. Vitamin E supplementation is sometimes beneficial but can take several months to show much effect. Severe cases require treatment with corticosteroids. It is possible that other immunosuppressive therapy such as gold salts or azathioprine (Immuran) could be beneficial but this is rarely necessary to consider. In people, this condition is often responsive to antimalarial medications but I do not know if this is safe or effective therapy for dogs.

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    Wow, thank you very much for all this advice DogSavvy. It is great to have such knowledge at this forum. Much appreciated!

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    You're ! Hope it helps
    Last edited by DogSavvy; 09-18-2009 at 11:29 AM.

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    I wasn't suggesting it was DL, I said it may be if...

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    Holly's nose changed colour as she got older. It was black as a pup but at some point it gradually went lighter. I think this is pretty normal for a yellow lab, But I'm no expert.
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