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Thread: What To Do?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default What To Do?

    Hey there,

    I'm not too sure on what I'm meant to be doing or how to go about it. Some background, first up. My household is not a very dog-friendly place. My parents don't exactly care for Leo (which is sad, because my mum was the one who bought him), and just about tolerate him. As such, I cannot teach him full dominance, etc (he thinks he's in charge over everyone but me), as no one but me is willing to put the effort in to teach him to behave. Also, since my parents are unwilling to foot the bill, and I am in year twelve and cannot work enough, I cannot get him desexed or properly trained.

    I have been taking him to a dog park rather regularly, but today was the first time that there had been a lot of dogs there. Since he had never really met other dogs, he was understandably excited and jumpy (I didn't trust him enough to let him off the leash). He doesn't like many dogs in his face at once, and tried to chase every ball he saw flying

    I wasn't too sure about him though. I wanted to be able to let him off the leash to go play, but I wasn't sure if a, I could get him back if he bolted, and b, how he'd react to dogs if I wasn't near to stop dogs surrounding him. I was also thinking that he'd try to steal toys (he goes nuts for squeaky toys), and if this would cause fights.

    How can I currently improve this situation? Keep taking him there to socialise with more dogs? My dad, who has recently moved up here from Sydney, has a labrador who is very friendly and playful. Would it be worth it to bring her here (or Leo there) to play with each other?

    Obviously as I am able to pay for him to do so, I will be enrolling him into puppy classes and getting him desexed. These are just not feasible at the moment.

    Thanks for your input (and reading my novel ).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,367

    Default

    Hi there and well done for all your dedication

    I go to the offleash park regularly and luckily we have a great group of dog owners there who keep a good eye on their dogs and help the new ppl and their dogs out.
    1st of all, is your dog park fully fenced? If so, go down there at a time when no-one esle is there...let him off the leash and let him sniff around..this is where you practice your recall and praise him with a treat every time.
    Once you are happy with him comming when called...try to go there when there is just 1 or 2 dogs about and let him off to play. Most dogs are happy to play and sniff eachother. I do think owners should refrain from bringing their dogs toys with them as it does ask for a fight between dogs....but how can it be stopped

    And yes...let him socialize with as many dogs as possible (your dad's dog sounds perfect)...it's great having a social dog and watching them play
    Last edited by ozeymum; 09-05-2009 at 06:36 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central QLD
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Sounds like he is lucky to have you looking out for him.

    I agree with the PP. As for socialising, I have dogs come to my house, however I am confident with them. In your situation I would make sure any socialising is done on neutral teritory. And that includes not initially taking your dog to your dads house.

    I would check with the local shelters in your area and see if they offer discount desexing. Alot just want the spread of unwanted puppies to stop and may help you out if you explain your situation to them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
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    Default

    Thanks for your advice, ozeymum. I had a walk around the first time I was there, and yes it was fully fenced. There were one or two holes that Leo could get through if he dug for ten minutes, but I doubt he'd try with all the smells around.

    He gets pretty focused when he has something to go at, such as when he barks at people outside the fence, cars, etc. The only thing I've found that can distract him is a squeaky toy. Perhaps it would be worth a dog whistle or something similar (even a normal whistle) to call him when he's distracted? I will practice at the park though.

    I agree with the toy comment (even though today was the first time I've been there with dogs, and there were about 30 of them...). Some dogs were already stealing others' toys. The squeaky ones make Leo downright uncontrollable, but perhaps if he responded better to calling, then this wouldn't be so much of a problem?

    As for my dad's dog, where would it be better for introducing them? I'm not too knowledgeable on dog behaviour, and Leo is yard defensive, so I don't know if he'd try to attack Daisy as a possible intruder?

    Thanks again

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I was writing while you were dreamingoflove

    Would you suggest something like the local park (not the dog park) for introductions? If so, how would you suggest going from the park, to either of our yards (so that I don't get it wrong, haha)?

    I'll have a look around at the shelters.

    Thanks for the advice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

    Default

    It seems like your father and his dog have arrived at just the right time.

    If the first meetings at your local park go well you could then progress to your father's home and later your own.

    Perhaps your father could help with desexing costs? If not don't worry too much. Provided you keep your dog confined to his own yard he is not going to increase the unwanted dog population. Until around 1980 a lot of Vets still refused to castrate male dogs saying it was not necessary. Of course most Vets in the olden days were men. If you look after your dog correctly it won't hurt to put off castration until you can afford it.

    Hope all goes well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    Thanks Deerhound. I'll have to find out. And thanks for the trivia, it makes sense why the vets say no...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Western Victoria
    Posts
    151

    Default

    Hey something I would do.... I know down here they have occasions when vets will work on desexing for vastly discounted rates as a sort of community service.... Have a talk to your vet or drop them a note, explain the situation as you have here, and just see if they are prepared to do something to help you out. All your problems will be a little easier if he is desexed, and at least he is male so much cheaper to do too. Let us know how you go please. If you are not a worthwhile cause then I don't know what is.
    Topdog collars (formerly Soverencraft.)
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