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Thread: Australia - Pedigree Dogs Exposed

  1. #31

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    Hello everyone, I just watched the Documentary its very disturbing.

    I have a link if you would like to watch it click on the link below.

    Documentary - BBC - Pedigree Dogs Exposed Video by bordercollie19 - MySpace Video

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    I found this documentary very distressing. The things humans do for the sake of "fame", "money" never ceases to astound me. We have seen the other side whith the farming of dogs for the supply to pet shops and the cruelty they endure. When are we going to stop using and abusing for the almighty dollar. So what is considered a "normal" or healthy pedigree dog? Perhaps the word "Pedigree" should have a new meaning - or maybe we should call these dogs "made to measure"?

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    There seemed to be two main gripes

    1. that the Kennel Club allowed puppies from incestuous matings (inbreeding) to be registered. This is not done by the Swedish? Kennel Club

    2. that dogs with known genetic faults - leading to short painful lives, are allowed to win dog shows, and allowed to breed, and allowed to have their puppies registered as pedigree. Which leads to more sick dogs.

    They did interview the cavalier spaniel breeders, and the kennel club president was a breeder of border terriers, and they also interviewed someone who breed bassetts? All these people seem to think it was ok to have inbred dogs and pass on genetic faults. Some of them were dumb enough to disagree with multiple peer reviewed scientific papers about the inbreeding (ie mating brother and sister or father and daughter, or grandfather and daugther etc) passing on genetic faults.

    One of them (The Kennel Club president/chairman?) didn't understand why dog incest should be banned for the same reason human incest is. The Kennel Club geneticist seemed to understand the problems but was too scared to recommend doing anything about it because they'd lose contact with the breeders. Um. Really?

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Perth, WA
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    I was flicking channels and came across it when a cavalier was writhing around on the ground screaming in agony, my god i felt so sick

    Definitely not an expert here but my two cents -

    I agree that the breed standards should be changed. This is evident in the ridgeback example - breeders say without the ridge it's not a ridgeback. True, but this is only because the breed standard says so. (am i getting this right?) Any thoughts on the disease ridgies get because they have the ridge?

    The owner of the cavalier that won best in show knew the dog had that 'My...something' disease - he sired 26 litters after he was diagnosed. How can they knowingly pass this terrible disease on? Do they truly & blindly believe it's not a problem?
    As the neurological vet nurse pointed out, you can bash a dog to cause that much pain and be prosecuted, yet it's ok to knowingly produce dogs that will suffer this pain.

    I do kind of agree with the guy from the kennel club who said banning inbreeding would drive away the breeders - I could see how that could happen.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
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    It really was terrible when they were talking to the Rhodesian Ridgeback breeder and she said that one in 20 of the puppies are born without a ridge. Because this is against the Kennel Club guide lines of that breed, this perfectly healthy puppy is put down. Im sure I have put down many of these puppies that didnt fit breed guide lines and I didnt even know it Im happy they dont though, I'd probly own a lot more that 2 dogs if they did.
    Education not Legislation

  6. #36

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    Now I'm REALLY happy I didn't watch it. My Mishka is half Ridgie.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSDs4Ever View Post
    Now I'm REALLY happy I didn't watch it. My Mishka is half Ridgie.
    What a cutie.
    It really was horrible
    Education not Legislation

  8. #38

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    Ta. I love her very much.

    Mish had her glands out in April 2008 & there was a malignant cancerous lump on the right one. They gave her 6 months as it's a particularly aggressive cancer prevalent in females over 9. To the vet's stunned amazement, Mish is still with us & continues to "run the show" at home with the 2 young 'uns. She'll be 12 in December & at her annual check up in April, the vet said at this stage, she'll check out due to old age. Go Mish !! Her nickname in the house is "The Big Dog".

  9. #39

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    The culling issue is different to the mis-management of breeding and health issue. Has anyone stopped to think that the ridgeless ridgebacks are culled as there is no potential homes for them? I personally don't agree with culling at birth, but consider this and give me your thoughts:

    You have a high demand breed. Sometimes newborn pups show immediately a fault which you know will mean they do not comply with the breed standard requirements. You have limited space to keep these dogs in the manner that they deserve for their lifetime, and you can be pretty much assured that finding them a caring, responsible home will be next to impossible. Do you, A - put them to sleep; or B - let them survive?

    Breeders have a responsibility to not produce unhomeable dogs, which have the potential to suffer lack of care and homelessness. Part of this is health screening and well planned breeding in the first place, but breeding is never 100% predictable.

    Don't throw it on me personally, as I wouldn't cull "undesirable" newborns. But I am lucky to keep a breed that doesn't suffer major cosmetic faults, and are low demand anyway so are generally only bred when there is sufficient genuine interested and appropriate homes waiting. I would not hesitate for a moment to PTS a puppy that showed incurable health or physical problems.

    My problem with this documentary is not what it shows, because I know that not all is perfect in the dog world. But that it shows a very narrow view of breeders, and of breeds for that matter. How many breeds were actually featured? Less than 10?

    Many breeds currently look, act and have similar health to, what they have had for hundreds of years.

    Inbreeding is only ever a problem when done from stock that have inherent health problems. Arabian horses have been deliberately inbred for over 7 thousand years and remain one of the healthiest horse breeds on the planet. Speaking of horses, did you know that all thoroughbreds in the world are descended from just four founding males???? How's that for a gene pool. But are they all keeling over? No.

    Irresponsibility is breeding stock with health problems, as was displayed in this program. Unhealthy animals reproduce that, whether inbred or outcrossed. Inbreeding just concentrates a family health issue.

    But most breeders, and all good breeders, go to considerable expense and huge amounts of trouble to ensure the best health of their breeding stock. Most breeders are in it for the long run, and breeding bad stock cannot have any future for the survival of their chosen breed. This is what is is really about, being custodian of a breed. It means more than all the ribbons in the world.
    Last edited by Nattylou; 09-12-2009 at 10:52 PM. Reason: can't spell this late at night!

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    As the neurological vet nurse pointed out, you can bash a dog to cause that much pain and be prosecuted, yet it's ok to knowingly produce dogs that will suffer this pain.
    I understand a bit of a typo regarding "neurological vet nurse". That person was Clare Rusbridge BVMS PhD DipECVN MRCVS RCVS and European Specialist in Veterinary Neurology. Her website is at this address.
    Clare Rusbridge - Veterinary-neurologist.co.uk Homepage
    .

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