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Thread: Sometimes, its not us, are dogs are genuinely 'special needs'

  1. #1
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    Default Sometimes, its not us, are dogs are genuinely 'special needs'

    Interesting article, on how 'some' dogs, are just very special needs. And nothing to do with how they were raised.

    It’s Not How They’re Raised, It’s How Dogs are Managed That Matters Most | notes from a dog walker

    And another link from a dog trainer, that bought new dog, from responsible breeder, trained it well, and then it all went to shit. Again, nothing to do with poor training, raising.

    Voyage with Cuba – The Next Leg | Rewarding Behaviors Dog Training, Binghamton

    IF like me, and dog trainer who wrote this, you have owned one of these 'special' dogs. It is very validating, that it wasnt you!
    Some dogs are just nut bags. And then require managing for rest of life. I took on a Rottie, that was exactly the same as Cujo in the story. Terrified of most things, extremely reactive.

    Which is why i enjoyed both above articles. RIP Kevin1. Heaps of time, energy went into him. And he taught me so much, and we had such a special relationship i'll never forget. When you have a highly reactive dog, who's terrified on wind, BUT trusts you enough to venture out in it, is awesome!

  2. #2
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    Thanks for those Bernie.

    I tried to find some more blog posts from Cuba's owner... nothing much about Cuba. And that particular blog site the most recent blog post on it in 2012 was some family emergency and cancelling all classes, tho she's made some more recent posts on Dogster, but not about Cuba. So I don't know if he's coping or how she's dealing with it now.

    But it's true, sometimes the best dog trainers cannot fix a "broken" dog. One of my favourite Australian agility dog trainers who also works with Susan Garrett - has one of those. Just terrified of almost everything. And really reactive. They tried all sorts of desensitization but didn't work and that dog while having a great agility build - can't compete. The noise and action from all the other dogs is too much.

  3. #3
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    I came across this today relevant to this topic
    How Dog Breeders impact on our Dogs Behaviour and Health| Doglistener

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Thanks for those Bernie.

    But it's true, sometimes the best dog trainers cannot fix a "broken" dog. One of my favourite Australian agility dog trainers who also works with Susan Garrett - has one of those. Just terrified of almost everything. And really reactive. They tried all sorts of desensitization but didn't work and that dog while having a great agility build - can't compete. The noise and action from all the other dogs is too much.
    Yes I have had one of those. Desensitization worked to a degree but despite her wonderful ability to do agility and obedience at the local club there was no way I could have put her into a real trialing situation. When I first realised something was wrong I had no idea how I was going to deal with it. Fortunately with the help of several experienced people at the local club and a professional trainer I was able to help her to some extent but more than anything the whole experience sure taught me a lot. I had a few high drive dogs before her who were well trained by me with lovely temperaments so it wasn't as if I was a complete novice but she was something else. I haven't had anything like her since either. These dogs are very different and it can be very difficult to deal with their fears. Management is extremely important to keep everyone safe and happy.

  5. #5
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    cheers for article farrview, that's my morning coffee break read today as working
    After reading your post, whilst i found it challenging, frustrating, tear producing. I DID know the rottie was 'special' and needed to live on a farm according to the owner. I know 'live on a farm' is dog speak, for real issues i cannot overcome with my dog.
    It must be doubly worse, to of planned, researched, found and trained to little avail, what should of been a 'normal' pup to adulthood. I feel for you. Ripped off in some ways, but seriously how much have these dogs taught us about desensitizing skills at least.

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