Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Rottie or not?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    shitney
    Posts
    1,188

    Default Rottie or not?

    Hey all,

    Question, it time to get another dog.... This time I'm thinking of a rottie.

    Pros and cons of the breed?

    Any info on good breeders?

    Obviously it'll be a family pet, need to get along with Jonah, and be good with kids... Although I know all that comes with training...would I be better off with another big breed?

    I know it's an open question, but want people's opinions on them and their ability to integrate with a family.

    Thanks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,537

    Default

    I think Rotties can be gorgeous - one from a breeder that selects for a polite home dog temperament. I've met some lovely ones in Adelaide and some horrible ones.

    Main disadvantage is their size - my friend who had a puppy with Frosty - she could not walk it more than 10 minutes at a time so that she preserved its joints as a puppy. Until it was about 6 months old but even then she was very careful about how much walking it got.

    So I know one good breeder in SA - at least I think her dogs are gorgeous and very polite and good with other dogs. But I'm thinking that might be a bit far away from you. Beverley was secretary of the local rottie club - you could ask her if she could recommend a breeder closer to you. If I was going to get one - I'd get one of hers.
    Dogz Online Member Profile

  3. #3

    Default

    Love rotties ! They are nicknamed the ‘banana dog’ – because they bend themselves around you - and all the ones I have come across in the past have done exactly that.

    Definitely a family pup – but you will reap what you sow. Training is very important – but I know I am talking to ‘choir’ here with you.

    Make sure you do your homework on breeders. This breed does have a lot of health issues. So, if breeders are not health testing – then find someone else.

    Health Issues:

    Overview – Rottweiler Club of Victoria

    This is a better link than the NSW one for more information:

    Rottweiler Club of Victoria

    Even though I love this breed – I wouldn't get one.

    I have not come across one that didn't have some sort of problems with - hips, CLs and cancer – sometimes all 3. Their life span is short enough without these types of problems.

    Sorry, I can’t help you with breeders. Family lost the last rottie ~ 4 years ago and they are not intending to get another one – so I haven’t kept up with it all.

    Good Luck !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Whilst i know there are health risks with this kind of dog. Thankfully, ive not had these conditions in my dogs. My 4th rottie and first ever female, has a luxiating patella, that cost $3400 to fix for 4 weeks, before it broke again. And 2yrs for me to pay off the surgery fees. So as with any dog, get pet insurance.

    Energy wise: mine have all had similar energy levels. Lit up and alert, and full of beans when out. Then asleep within 10 mins of return. they do like to rest a LOT. So couch potatoe indoors, bullet speed outside. They adore training, but not at class pace, similar to mastiff's, that boring repitition stuff is no good. Gotta mix it up a bit.

    They have all been inside family dogs. And fit the role well, dont shed much, easy clean double coat around the rough, single else where on body.

    When we first got Kevin our first rottie, we tried to keep him outside for when i was washing floors etc. He removed the window frame with his jaw, just ripped it out of the house from the garden side and came back in. They are incredible strong. To the point, you must train heel position well, or you are off balanced with a single lunge move, and on the floor. The males ive had have weighed in at 7stone, so yeah, a good heel is a must.

    Silky leash has worked brilliantly for all my rotties: do what you like so long as you dont pull, has always been interpreted by my rotties as all 360degrees of leash, so that backing out of collar, lungeing forward, then there their verticle jumping from a stand to above your head with goofy big lick of my chops on the way down< bloody neat trick eh.

    they are leaners, sit on your foot, and put the entire body weight on my skeleton as they flop on/over/around me. They are velcro dogs usually. Great at the heel say in comparison to herding breeds that like to up front or driving you from behind.
    The rotties i have had, prefer the heel position to away from my body like a GSD is comfy with.

    They have a sense of humour, that you can come a cropper to: they love to sneak up with stalking, then they jump you when you are gardening. All of mine have done this. Me busy with my back turned, = jump and deck her quick!
    They do excellent take downs for fun. Be prepared. They know the exact spot to knock the back of your legs, so you go dont fast. Rotties adore romping with other dogs, and you need bigguns to allow this kind of play, as they break stuff like small boned dogs by accident.

    The 2nd fave game of the rottie is tug of war. I believe it is compulsory to play this game with a rottie. It should form part of the breed description. But whilst mine have all been strong enough to drag a adult human with one yank of the tug off the sofa and onto the floor, all of them when playing tug of war with a small child, or pup, pull their punches, and do it very gently. They are very gentle with children.

    All have been such characters. All have been raised here, training daily, exercised daily, swam daily kinda lifestyle, and i have never had issues with my rotties. Go to rottie club vic, and you'll see plenty of folks who are struggling with controlling their dogs though. So clearly, its not always plain sailing with training. They can be strong willed, and many a day, i have stopped training, due to dogs demeanor on the day being not right. Very willful etc. But fine when we get back to it later. But seriously do have stubborn moods.


    Worst aggro was a next door neighbors small yappy thing, that would be aggressive through the fence to my rotties, who ignored the barking. However, silly small dog dug under fence and came through to have a go at the rottie. It did not end well for the small chap. He had the entire dog half way down his throat, and the head was sticking out between his teeth. He did spit the dog like a ball for me on command. And neighbors watched the entire process, must of been horrifying for them. small yappy thing survived, with 22 stitches, bruises and never yapped again at the fence for the 2 years before they moved away.
    So pretty effective with intruders.

    Gaurd dogs. well, this is a little hit n miss really in a rottie. Pohm, my mature female and i, hid in the bush when attacked by a stray malamute. It was the GSD who had to save both of us, as we were too scared to come out of bushes. lol
    But my 3 boys, have all been excellent gaurd dogs. And i feel very secure with them on a leash, regardless of where i am, and who's about. they have my back.

    All of my rotties have loved to play fight each other and family members. They have not been allowed to do this in the house, where only calm sedate behaviour is welcome. So they do so in silence, rolling on floor, careful not to make any noise that might alert me to a fight going on, in order to prolong the game. sneaky buggers too.
    2 have been true masochists.
    first one, had a cat climbing scratch step affair, that he would use the rope on it, to hold, and bash himself around the head with the cat stand, then attack it. < see special dog.
    2nd would hold onto the bark collar of the other, to catch a zap, then run zoomies for fun < another special rottie.
    Hey, they are all a little bit 'special'.

    They are slow to mature, roughly 3yrs before they stop the zoomie silly stuff.
    Can eat a marrow bone in an afternoon, or if you prefer, your window frame, you choose what the rottie chomps on as a pup. I have no idea how folks who fear to give their dogs bones cope with the rotties need to chew without marrow bones or antlers?

    We live in wildlife sanctuary, and mine have been easily trained to ignore: geese/ducks/roos/rabbits/chooks. There is one paddock ONLY in my world where rabbits are allowed to be chased. I have kept this very location specific, and none of the 4 have had difficulty understanding the difference between a rabbit in back garden not allowed to chase, and rabbit in this particular paddock i allow them to go coursing for rabbits. Rotties are crap hunters! always had their noses down the hole, whilst rabbits dart all around them above ground for the GSD's to chase.
    they LOVE water, and swimming.

    So there, totally unbiased info of course!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    shitney
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Lol, as far as trainability between males and female? Would you say on is easier than the other?
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    We were lucky as we had a calm and gentle Rottie girl. Our girl was no trouble at all but she did like to dig large holes...as bernie said they don't mature till 3 yrs old and are short lived...8/10 years.

    Do you like slime because they leave it everywhere...Opal would stand in front of the TV and shake her head and Rottie slime would run down the screen and if you were near you'd cop it too...so I would carry a Rottie rag at all times to wipe her face and they snore too.

    No jumping...running too much and no walking on slippery floors for the first 12 mths of their lives to protect their hips and never over feed them at any time. Opal had a wonderful temperament especially being an ex cruelty case...bashed...starved and kept on a chain but when she learnt to trust us we saw why this breed is so loved.

    I've only owned one so I'm no expert and they are not all the same but I'm glad I did...we lost her to cancer two years ago aged 10 and is missed every day.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  7. #7

    Default

    'reyzor' - I started a thread up a long time ago - thought it may be helpful for you !

    OOps - I have tried to put up the link for you - but it appears if I try again - I will get locked out yet again for more days !

    The title was - Does the sex of your dog affect your ability to ...... ?

    I find my boys easier to train - but my girls in the past have nailed the training very easily. I love and have no problems with both my boys and girls in the past - and normally have one of each at one time.

    Looks like it will be a 'family' vote ?

    Maybe PM ‘Nekhbet’ and see what she thinks ?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,537

    Default

    The reason I like girl dogs is more belly to rub and less chance (but not zero) of them cocking legs on stuff.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    shitney
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Hmmmmmmm looks like I need to get out and meet some of both sexes and make up my own mind haha
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,537

    Default

    I've not noticed much difference. I currently have a girl dog and she's been the most difficult dog to train ever. But the first two girl dogs in my family were comparatively easy.

    Susan Garrett's had a bit of a mix. She's currently developing a girl dog puppy that she says is the most challenging dog she's ever had to train. But she said that about the boy dogs she had before that. Tho interestingly not about Encore (aka Einstein) and Feature girl dogs between Buzzy and Swagger boy dogs. So I guess for her - the girl dogs have been easier to train on average.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •