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Thread: Whats the right thing to do? Dog fight

  1. #11
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    hmm

    A short tight lead - often triggers aggression in some dogs because they equate that with being unable to flee. Ie they don't realise they can back off if the lead is tight. They think their choice to avoid is gone, so they choose fight.

    A short loose lead maybe - but then the human is very close and that can trigger aggression too ie I have to protect my human / resource.

    So I prefer not to let a greeting happen with a dog that is clearly so stiff and upright before they even get into nose touch range. I don't know why so many people will let their clueless dog greet one that is clearly upset and in an aggressive pose, ie very stiff and focussed on the approaching dogs with not one "I'm friendly no threat" signal. Or no mirroring of the other dog's "I'm friendly no threat signals".

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    If all dogs were on a lead and under control this wouldn't have happened in the first place.

    I can't believe the people in the video let two strange dogs walk up to each other on loose leads and see what happens.
    isnt that how your supposed to approach another dog, loose leashed? Or am i doing it wrong?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    isnt that how your supposed to approach another dog, loose leashed? Or am i doing it wrong?
    It could lead to an uncontrolled lunge. I would be inclined to watch the body language very carefully and be keeping at a distance that the dogs are not in striking range. That should be done on a loose lead. This gives an opportunity for the dogs to check each other out and for the humans to observe their reactions to each other and proceed from there. If the dogs seem friendly and relaxed then greeting on a loose lead.

  4. #14
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    Yes in the video I posted the humans failed to notice that one dog was being aggressive posing, and the other one was trying to say "I'm no threat" which the big dog was ignoring. The humans should have never let those two dogs get within sniffing range.

  5. #15
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    And this is exactly how incidents have occurred with my dogs. A total numb nuts on the end of the dog's leash. Who is totally unable to read their own friggin dog!

    Our last bush camping trip. We took the baby. Some idiot 'dog whisperer' came walking past our camp and wanted to pat the dogs.
    I said, no way mate, the baby is on the ground, dont come any closer. He walked straight to the rottie saying, "its allright, i know Rotties very well" < had never met MY rottie before. This made me angry. Im very protective over my dogs, and prevent squabbles with dogs, or gaurding with strangers nearby. I was angry at him putting my dogs at risk. Dogs picked up on my anger and helped out thus:

    What a stupid statement to make. And also stupid, he had not noticed the GSD now standing in front of the baby, growling at him, lip curled up exposing teeth, staring right at him, leaning and dead still. Blind perhaps? And funnier still, did not know what hit him, when Sherlock pup tore out from under the ute and sank his teeth into the intruders calf drawing blood, with a rather nasty bite.

    Happy to oblige in his continuous learning journey. He then told me i had dangerous dogs. He's right, they are 160lb of gaurding between them, a baby on the floor and a stranger entering camp ground. Seriously? how dangerous is that? "i know rotties" my arse. I actually do know rotties, and none of them would put up with this shit.



    Intruder left bleeding and learnt.

    twat.

  6. #16
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    bernie,

    A few years ago at Rottie training...a new guy started with his large male Rottie. I walked my Rottie Opal on a short lead up to him and his dog (His dog on loose lead) and from a distance said is your Rottie alright with other dogs ?

    The guy said yes so I moved closer to let them smell each other...without warning this Rottie lunged and bit Opal...I pulled Opal back and this guy just stood there and I said you told me your dog was OK with other dogs...to which he said...he usually is...yeah right.

    If this clown knew how to handle and control his dog (short lead too) my girl wouldn't have been bitten...he might have been watching youtube videos too.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  7. #17
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    without warning this Rottie lunged and bit Opal
    I've had this happen to my dog too. And yes the biting Rottie was good with some dogs but not all. Definitely not mine and not a friends border collie and it got to the point where this guy could not train with his dog off lead at club despite graduating "grade 5" into the off lead classes ie was supposed to come when called and do a proper stay. It couldn't do either if it decided it was going to attack some random dog.

    The first time that dog bit mine - the owner said "it was just playing". Maybe it was cos my dog was just limping for the next 10 minutes and not bleeding to death but NOT OK.

  8. #18
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    It all boils down to what we're taught and if it works then stick to it. One thing in the video stands out...it's staged and the owners know their dogs and know what will happen...not so in real life.

    We might know our own dog (most of the time) but we don't know the other persons dog...imagine that Rottie in a dog park off lead. At GSD training years ago I was walking Rex past a solid black GSD bitch...I wasn't trying to introduce him...just walking past...about 2 m away.

    Owner had her on a loose lead and wasn't even looking must have known what she was like because latter others said we never go near that dog...she went Rex and bit him on the face...lucky it was only a nip but scared me and I never went near her again either. I have seen the same thing at All Breeds Training too...people just let their dogs run up to other dogs and the result in some cases needs a vet.

    I'm all for socialization but not hospitalization because people don't know how to handle and control their own dog.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

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