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Thread: Groomers taking unvaccinated dogs....

  1. #1
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    Default Groomers taking unvaccinated dogs....

    Just wanting peoples thoughts on this. I know a lot of people are under the impression that grooming salons shouldn't groom unvaccinated dogs. I currently don't have a policy on whether a dog is vaccinated or not, but i know some people do.... I'm just wondering peoples thoughts on whether its a good idea or not?

    If I didn't take unvaccinated dogs, I'd lose a heap of customers, all those dogs who's owners only get them groomed every 6 months or so and the dog is constantly matted and has no quality of life.... yeah... those dogs, most of them aren't vaccinated. I think it would be kind of sad if I had to turn away dogs in need like that....

    So I guess what I'm wondering is whether it really matters? If things were cleaned constantly to a vet standard (I use the same cleaning stuff as the vet, it kills pretty much everything)... then does it matter if there are unvaccinated dogs coming/going?

    I groom unvaccinated dogs at the vet all the time and we've never had problems. Its sort of a given really, you can't expect to go to a vet and not encounter unvaccinated animals... they come in for other reasons, and people don't want to pay for vaccinations.... as far as I'm aware as long as things are cleaned thoroughly then it doesn't matter.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I think cleaning everything reduces the risk.

    I go to a groomer and I haven't asked. My dog is vaccinated so apart from kennel cough - I think the risk of her getting something is fairly low. It's the puppies and the ones who haven't vaccinated that are at risk from each other.

    Any chance you can do a deal with your vet to offer a fixed price discount vax? ie here is a certificate to get your dog vaxxed at 20% off - the total cost for three vax will be - $ tho it would be better if they get the one shot vax.

    Ask the vet what they think. Obviously they treat unvaccinated dogs too. It would probably help you if the vet lets you know if they get any cases of stuff that would be prevented by vaccination. You could take more precautions or explain the risk to your customers.

    And I did puppy preschool at a vet... didn't get anything.

  3. #3
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    Thats an interesting idea, I could definitely look into that.

    We do puppy preschool at the clinic too and it is right near the grooming room where I regularly groom unvaccinated dogs... Cleaning is definitely key, I reckon! The stuff we use kills pretty much everything including Parvo, so its pretty good.

    Probably really isn't that much to worry about... I just was thinking about it after a friend told me the other day that I shouldn't groom unvaccinated dogs.

  4. #4
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    HI MDD

    Friends can be so helpful that way.

    Lots of people like a "bargain" so that might get a few more of them vaccinated.

    Or if they are being groomed regularily - maybe you could offer a discount to the vaccinated ones, and charge "regular price" to the unvaccinated ones or offer them a sort of if you pay this much for grooming and come in at least 8 times in a year, you get vax for free...

    Reward based training for customers?

  5. #5
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    I find it extremely hard to believe that some people would spend a lot of money grooming their dog...yet not vaccinate them.

    I suppose if the dog dies of Parvo...Distemper etc as a result of not being vaccinated at least the dog will look nice.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  6. #6
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    I think vaccinations for grooming is nuts. Here's why.

    How animals catch illness 101
    Take one infected dog, must be infected AND infectious (high virul loading for eg). Both aspects are on different time lines, and are very different times in duration. (eg. So whlst you kept fido at home today, as he's down in the dumps and not infectious, he got his hair cut last week, when he was infections)
    Then you need a immune compromised dog
    Then you need a vector of transmission: different for different illnesses: mucus, urine, feaces, vomit etc and it has to get inside the body to infect. A nice water bowel for sharing is great for this!

    You need ALL of the above to be present, to transfer the infection


    Parvovirus.
    There are several strains of parvovirus however the most concerning are CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. CPV-2a is the most common strain in Australia. Although reported in Asia, American and Europe, CPV-2c has not been reported in Australia.
    Parvovirus is spread by (oral or nasal) contact with contaminated faeces, a contaminated environment or contaminated objects.
    It is extremely resistant to the environment and can survive on objects like clothing, shoes, floors for 5 months or longer
    Infection control measures as you are taking, are sufficient. Whilst here is a recent increase in Parvo in Victoria, this is not in the vaccinated group of dogs.
    Behavioural control of the animal's elimination process in your care for infection control.
    Current recommendations from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccine Guidelines Group is to vaccinate against parvovirus every three years.

    Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) is shed into the environment in the vomit, diarrhea, urine, eye secretions and respiratory secretions (saliva, nasal discharges, sputum/phlegm and expectorant - the mucus and aerosolized droplets that explode from the trachea of an animal into the air when it coughs) It is possible for dogs to also ingest infectious distemper viral particles when they lick the shoes, hands or clothes of a human that has been in hands-on contact with an affected animal. Again, infection control measures suffice.

    Hepatitis: spreads same way as distemper.

    Kennel Cough, is a medley of virus' and bacterium. And, yep, its a cough. No more, no less. Chill people. The Vaccinations of dogs, does not keep in tune with the strains of infection circulating around the world, in patterns that are detectable. So as we know strain A is on its way, we can give strain A vaccinations, only, we cant get them so we get strain B instead. We have the wrong vaccine for the wrong strain in dogs, as we do in humans. But each to their own.

    If you are following infection control measures, as described in your code of practice for wherever you are, Victoria is by DEPI here, then you are doing all that is expected, necessary, required.

    DEPI - Code of Practice for the Operation of Shelters and Pounds

    I would be taking my own infection control measures as your customer, and that's MY responsibility:
    Only let healthy dogs out
    Vaccinate regularly C3 3 yearly for me
    Avoid dog parks, puppy classes, or other high traffic places where dogs can socialize that are not vaccinated
    Wash my hands after grooming
    Wash equipment after grooming
    pick up my dogs poo

    You keep your business clean and i'll visit

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    I find it extremely hard to believe that some people would spend a lot of money grooming their dog...yet not vaccinate them.

    I suppose if the dog dies of Parvo...Distemper etc as a result of not being vaccinated at least the dog will look nice.
    I totally get it. Why have a flu A vaccine, if flu B pathogens are what's in the environment currently?
    Why have kennel cough vaccine, if you never put your dog in a kennel? and dont mix with dogs often?

    I spend a lot of time caring for my 2 dogs with ACL injuries post their friggin surgery, whilst i will wait for years for the same operation myself. Sometimes, animal husbandary doesnt make common sense lol

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    I find it extremely hard to believe that some people would spend a lot of money grooming their dog...yet not vaccinate them.

    I suppose if the dog dies of Parvo...Distemper etc as a result of not being vaccinated at least the dog will look nice.
    They don't spend a lot of money. They leave their fluffy dog (one with fur that never stops growing) 6 to 12 months between grooming sessions, so the dog is in disgusting condition when it finally does get groomed. 99% of the time its left like this is because the owners 'can't afford' to get them groomed more often. You'd be surprised just how many people do this, I've seen things that could very easily be called abuse, and the owners had no idea there was even anything wrong.

    This is something that definitely happens more often in the country, when I groomed in Melbourne for a while the dogs were usually in great condition and a lot of it was about aesthetics... whereas down here, its often about getting the dog comfortable and healthy rather than making them look beautiful with long fluffy fur.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    I think vaccinations for grooming is nuts. Here's why.

    How animals catch illness 101
    Take one infected dog, must be infected AND infectious (high virul loading for eg). Both aspects are on different time lines, and are very different times in duration. (eg. So whlst you kept fido at home today, as he's down in the dumps and not infectious, he got his hair cut last week, when he was infections)
    Then you need a immune compromised dog
    Then you need a vector of transmission: different for different illnesses: mucus, urine, feaces, vomit etc and it has to get inside the body to infect. A nice water bowel for sharing is great for this!

    You need ALL of the above to be present, to transfer the infection


    Parvovirus.
    There are several strains of parvovirus however the most concerning are CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. CPV-2a is the most common strain in Australia. Although reported in Asia, American and Europe, CPV-2c has not been reported in Australia.
    Parvovirus is spread by (oral or nasal) contact with contaminated faeces, a contaminated environment or contaminated objects.
    It is extremely resistant to the environment and can survive on objects like clothing, shoes, floors for 5 months or longer
    Infection control measures as you are taking, are sufficient. Whilst here is a recent increase in Parvo in Victoria, this is not in the vaccinated group of dogs.
    Behavioural control of the animal's elimination process in your care for infection control.
    Current recommendations from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccine Guidelines Group is to vaccinate against parvovirus every three years.

    Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) is shed into the environment in the vomit, diarrhea, urine, eye secretions and respiratory secretions (saliva, nasal discharges, sputum/phlegm and expectorant - the mucus and aerosolized droplets that explode from the trachea of an animal into the air when it coughs) It is possible for dogs to also ingest infectious distemper viral particles when they lick the shoes, hands or clothes of a human that has been in hands-on contact with an affected animal. Again, infection control measures suffice.

    Hepatitis: spreads same way as distemper.

    Kennel Cough, is a medley of virus' and bacterium. And, yep, its a cough. No more, no less. Chill people. The Vaccinations of dogs, does not keep in tune with the strains of infection circulating around the world, in patterns that are detectable. So as we know strain A is on its way, we can give strain A vaccinations, only, we cant get them so we get strain B instead. We have the wrong vaccine for the wrong strain in dogs, as we do in humans. But each to their own.

    If you are following infection control measures, as described in your code of practice for wherever you are, Victoria is by DEPI here, then you are doing all that is expected, necessary, required.

    DEPI - Code of Practice for the Operation of Shelters and Pounds

    I would be taking my own infection control measures as your customer, and that's MY responsibility:
    Only let healthy dogs out
    Vaccinate regularly C3 3 yearly for me
    Avoid dog parks, puppy classes, or other high traffic places where dogs can socialize that are not vaccinated
    Wash my hands after grooming
    Wash equipment after grooming
    pick up my dogs poo

    You keep your business clean and i'll visit
    Brilliant, thanks Bernie!

    That's definitely helped me figure out the best options. When I was studying to be a groomer, I had to do a heap of assignments on the DEPI codes of practice, so I'm very aware of what is required. That kind of stuff is always drilled into you when involved in the animal industry.

  10. #10
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    Around here among the easily influenced by crap - there's a breeder and a whole bunch of her customers that believe that homeopathic vaccinations work.

    scientists who have actually tested these vaccines - report they provide zero immunity. And vets report that dogs with homeopathic vaccinations get the diseases (and die) that they were "vaccinated" against.

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