Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: good idea, not so good idea? your thoughts please cat and dog people

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default good idea, not so good idea? your thoughts please cat and dog people

    Pohm, our 5ish yr old rottie girl, has always been intensely interested in pups, ducklings, teddy bears, new baby grandson, you name it, if you can perceive it as baby, she's into it.

    Im wondering about a cat, as the mouse issue is stupid here, and colder weather has slowed amount of mice down, but not stopped them. Disgusting and im disgusted and sick of waking up thinking, what the heck is that smell? and finding our mouse traps under bed are full and need emptying. So ive been thinking about a cat now for a while.

    so a cat and my 2 dogs. That will present some issues, but ive brought a rabbit home to show the dogs, and it does appear that if i say its an ok thing and to 'leave it' they dont behave like its prey (under my supervision at least). Perhaps people can suggest ideas of how to intro a kitten, safest. And other than i have to have my cat in at night, do you need a licence in Victoria?
    I am neighboured by a JRT and what was once a pug. Will the kitten enter their gardens, as they look like they'd kill a kitten if they wanted to. JRT's are excellent ratters, does this make them kitten eaters? Basically, im worried all these dogs might kill a kitten. I can control mine, but not a neighbours dogs instincts.

    Giving a broody bitch a pup substitute. Risks.
    Im concerned about having a small animal and Pohm. She tends to mother small beings. She's rather distracted babysitting for my grandson currently, who's just gotten onto the floor (her space) as he's crawling. She's incessantly following him everywhere. And cutely, wont let him go near the edge of the deck, and hurds him back into the centre again. He's got a snotty nose, and she's not having that, so cleaning him on the crawl too. Yesterday, i was changing the nappy on floor, and she was there, watching baby closely when baby poo'd. The bitch stole the turd and ate it! Again, common in bitches and pups, but human turds? ugggggh.

    Pohm is my first ever female dog, and all i know about bitches is what ive experienced with her, so not much at all! But i do have a lot of old wives tales, superstition, and garbage info in my head to resolve.

    Ive heard: bitches that attach to small stuffed toys, should have the toys removed as some possible risk of phantom pregnancy, resource gaurding? is this true? Im so ignorant!

    If i gave her access to a kitten, will this count as a new baby for her. And is this a potential problem.

    She has been known to steal puppy from her owner we met, grabbed pup up and took it back home to bed, snuggled down with it, and given it a good wash and looking very happy in bed with her new stolen baby. Gave it up fine when asked.

    I dont like the rat sac idea for mice, as i have dogs and worry about them getting poisoned, thought a cat would work better. Only i know less about cats than i do bitches. And if im honest, im scared of cats also. But if i had a teeny one, perhaps i could get my brave on?
    I was raised on farms, where there were cats, but they were never in the house, and always ratting and catching their own food i guess. We certainly never fed them! But they were pretty fat cats none the less.

    most of my life, has been in the uk, and cats would keep your mice/rat issue down. But this is Aus, and there's some rule about not letting a cat out at night, to prevent this. But the cats i grew up with, hunted during the day too. Are cats allowed to hunt in their own property?

    I do not want to keep a cat if indoors is where they are supposed to be. That would upset me. Getting an animal and preventing what it enjoys.

    As i said, totally cat novice. any suggestions.

    When cats do that thing, where they did their claws into your bloody leg, draw blood, and owners say, its coz she likes you. How do you stop that ever happening. As that is my biggest feared cat behaviour. This is quirky bat shit stuff i know. But hey, we are all scared of something.

  2. #2

    Default

    Omg firstly what an absolute cutie your Pohm is!

    Iv always had cats. First and foremost as a "worker" for the tack, feed and chook sheds. They are nocturnal hunters mostly and I found their value as mice and rat hunters far more useful then traps or rat sack. I had two cats where we lived on our property in Beaudesert. They spent their days pretty much lolling around, sometimes inside but mostly in the sheds. I pretty much gave them free range to come and go from the house but only needed to supplement their diet once or twice a week. A hungry cat is always a better hunter.

    There is a big to-do on keeping cats indoors to protect wildlife. I agree with this in suburbia but in the country and especially on a property with a mouse/rat problem they can be more beneficial to keep plagues down and ask any grain or produce farmer they will tell you that a vermin plague can by far out weigh damage to our native wildlife then a cat can. So having a cat around that is full of mice and rats isn't generally going to hunt down and kill much native birds etc. The cats will make themselves at home where they have easy access to their food , in our case the sheds as described above.

    We already had the cats before we got dogs, and we got the dogs as pups so intros there were simple. I've found it much harder to introduce max to jojo (an adult male cat) then I ever did with Zeus and jake.

    Cats scratching legs to me sounds like a load of cods-whollop. Perhaps as kittens and when they are playing yeah sure they have sharp claws and I've had my share of scratches but these were in every case, my fault for roughing them up in play. Cats scratching furniture usually happens when the cat can't get outside to find a suitable tree or fence post to mark their scents (its what they do when they scratch things they have scent glands all over their bodies but their print paws have the strongest scent glands so this activity not only flexes and sharpens their claws it also marks out their territories. My cats (even Jojo now) have always been allowed to come and go as they please (kitty litters are disgusting so a cat toileting outside is soooooo much more convienient)

    The dogs in the neighbourhood tho.... There is not way to know how they will respond to a kitten until it's too late. Best advice I can give is to keep your kitten indoors until fully vaccinated, desexed and chipped. Cats have a mapping system or "homing system" that is surpassed by none and if they are allowed to explore prior to them having a chance to "home themselves" there is high likelihood of them getting lost. A cats homing system is not mature until around 4months old and should be kept indoors or fully supervised when outside until then. Let the kitten rub all over everything in your home. Collect its poo from the kitty litter and place it around an up close to your house to start with slowly moving the poo further away and closer to your fence line as it gets older. This will be your saving grace if the wee thing gets out by accident. It can smell its own poo 100meters away so it will help immensely with "homing" your kitten.

    Intros I used for Zeus and jake would not be relevant in your case but I have attached some links bellow for you to have a read.

    Cats on a farm or in the country are a blessing when you have a vermin issue. The prey is generally more healthy then what is found in the city drains and suburbs purely because of what they eat. In the country they tend to thrive on everyone's stock feed, grasses and their own natural prey like insects and frogs. In the city they live in drains, dumps and eat garbage and carry many many diseases. Even so, a country cat will still need strict worming and constant close inspection (they can easily get bitten by a big rat when hunting and big rats and even mice can do a lot of damage if inflicted anywhere on the cat but especially and most commonly the head, ears, nose, mouth and worst of all, eyes) and if your squeamish you better get used to the gifts that farm and barn cats love to bring home lol usually in the shape of a rat head, leg, tail etc THATS how a cat shows you it likes you lol

    Also it's worth a note that while a bad vermin infestation will keep a cat busy, sometimes it's almost unstoppable for the cat to catch a snake, bird, frog, lizards etc.... It's how they are programmed and it is inevitable especially in the cats first 12 months.

    As far as what will count as a baby for Pohm and weather it's a good or bad thing I will leave to others opinions. Has she ever seen a kitten?

    [url=http://www.paws.org/library/cats/home-life/introducing-cat-to-dog/]Introducing Your New Cat to Your Dog

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    I agree with keeping cats indoors in residential areas (more so because of their tendency to wander and the fact they will most likely quite happily cross any roads without a passing thought)... but if you live rural and have a vermin problem, then I'd say let them out.

    Personally though, I tend to prefer keeping them locked up... after losing 4 cats within 2 years because of outdoor dangers (cars, cat fights, drowning and one just disappeared never to be seen again, probably got hit by a car somewhere). I currently have 3 cats, one is a solely indoor cat (Seby), the others are indoor/outdoor (Tank and Bubbes).

    Seby was the first of the three, we kept him indoors because we couldn't bare to lose another cat after just losing our 4th in a row. We built him an outdoor cat run that he goes in at night time. He's happy and healthy, however he hasn't the faintest clue how to hunt (we've never had mice in the house).
    After a few years of having no cats outside we noticed some changes in the environment. All the stray cats disappeared (we always had a few hanging around) and the mice, rats and rabbits returned in plague numbers!! There were rabbits absolutely everywhere!! It was starting to become a massive problem so we started looking for some kittens to adopt as farm cats. Found two adult cats at the vet who needed homes, they worked out great.

    Tank was born to be an indoor cat, he hates being outside, he spends pretty much all day inside (his choice) but we always put the cats out at night (probably against the law, but when you have mice and rabbits around... weeellll....

    Bubbles is a totally different cat, she hates being inside, she spends probably 23 hours a day outside. We only really see her twice a day whens he comes for food, once in the morning and once in the evening.

    Neither of these two tend to wander (thank goodness) but I know all our previous cats loved to wander everywhere... onto the neighbours properties (our neighbours aren't close either!), onto the road as well (RIP Bob)...

    Tank and bubbles are fantastic hunters though. Rats, mice and rabbits are all now gone from near the house. Another unusual thing about these two is that they don't hunt birds! All our previous cats would hunt birds, but Tank and Bubbles don't, which is nice. Although since having cats outside again, the stray/feral cats have come back, Tank has had a few bad scratches on his face, and bubbles had to be rushed to the vet once with bad puncture wounds on her neck, her face was almost permanently paralysed!

    A lot of things depend on the cat's personality really, some wander, some don't, some hunt, some don't.... unfortunately most rescues won't allow you to adopt a cat unless you keep it indoors... But I've found the vets tend to not be as worried about that stuff (maybe thats because i live in a rural town though)... So maybe next kitten season, check out your local vets, no doubt they'll have heaps of kittens needing homes.

    Also if you want a hunter, be prepared to be woken up at ridiculous hours of the night to that stupid hunting meow they do saying "Look what I've got, i'm bringing it to show you, aren't you just so proud of me".... usually its still alive at this point too, they love playing with their catch.

    Cats scratching up your legs?? Never heard of that, of course kittens will be kittens and scratch/climb, but with discipline they quickly grow out of it, just like puppies who bite. Although if you definitely want to avoid nasty cats, don't get a siamese!! They tend to be a bit nasty, like to bite.... They are also like the huskies of the cat world, they are LOUD!! And also incredibly smart. I adore them, but you have to be able to put up with their sometimes nasty streak, lol!

    If your mouse problem is just in the house and you think it could be too dangerous having a cat loose outside then why not build/buy a cat run for outside so that it can sometimes go out there and get the fresh air and sunshine but still be safe....

    One thing's for sure, a cat would definitely fix that mouse problem of yours!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    I have always had desexed bitches so never any broodiness or phantom pregnancies. We did have an entire bitch years ago and yes she did get broody with stuffed toys and have endless phantom pregnancies untill my parents speyed her.

    Cats can be good mousers, we had a couple in our barn where we had hay and horse feed. However one also endlessly bought in dead birds like beautiful blue wrens and reptiles, so we had to put a big bell on his neck. He eventually was killed by a snake.

    These days I would always keep a cat in at night. I have feral cats hunting in my 20 acres of natural bush and they have decimated the wildlife. Local farmers now shoot and trap them in an effort to try and protect native birds and mammals. I am totaly agaisnt people allowing their cats to roam at night in the country, the wildlife devastation is horrific especially to ground nesting plovers and quail (their eggs are sitting targets) and small mammals, even frogmouth owls I have seen. One particularly sensitive area is netted and baited and monitored a regular basis by DEC to protect a rare small wallaby under pressure from cats and foxes. Climate change and drought are taking their toll on local wildlife without having cats in the mix as well.

    I have dogs but I control my mice with racumin and so far in the last five years have not had a problem. I put the baits where the dogs cant access them. I would not use the one feed poisons though. I think Racumin is safer for dogs.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-24-2015 at 02:06 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    They are nocturnal hunters mostly and I found their value as mice and rat hunters far more useful then traps or rat sack.
    Wow, I don't know any cats that good. Where I used to agist my horse - there were squillions of mice in the tack shed always. I didn't know about multi catch traps back then tho. There was also a big well fed brown snake (who lived under some pallets so the dogs and cats couldn't get him) so maybe that's why the cats left the shed alone.

    We only saw the brown snake in spring on the first sunny day - otherwise he kept himself to himself and kept all the other snakes away too.

    PS - I've found these very effective - have caught up to five mice at a time with peanut butter and dog food.
    http://www.gettrapped.com.au/index.p...3&product_id=2

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    Yes a cat can only cope with so many and if they find something easier like native animals they will go there. There are also cats that are better hunters than others as we discovered except the really good hunter did birds and reptiles too, despite the mice. It is called variety.

    I have found Racumin to be adequate for controlling mice in my sheds which have a lot of grain in them, but one has to be persistant. I have bait laid year round. I sometimes also back that up with traps. The first year there were heaps but the problem has become much less with time. I rarely get them in the house now.

    I just believe that we need to reduce the damage the nocturnal hunting of cats has on native species in our surrounding bushlands, they are lethal and effective hunters and the native wildlife does not stand a chance against them. We cant pretend it doesnt happen because it most certainly does even if we dont see it.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-25-2015 at 05:21 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    When over seas I heard of a brewery that paid a fellow to breed Manx cats soley for keeping the rodents at bay. They had a reputation as the worlds best mousers( aparently) So when O.H and I were in the middle of a mouse plaque, we saw an add for giveaway Manx cross kittens and got one.

    Best cat we ever had. She traveled 'round Auss with us and 3 dogs in the back of a ute and settled into any new place instantly. Never wandered or caught natives. Ever! She lived to a ripe old age and yep, she was brilliant at catching either mice or rats, and cleaned out one farm that had battled them for years.

    And she was a gentle soul, great with the kids.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I have a friend with two border terriers and no mice or rats in her back yard.

    It's a bit of a moonscape tho. Earth dogs. gotta love em.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    I saw a documentry that fitted cats with trackers and they went places at night that totally surprised their owners who thought they were not wandering or killing native animals. The research done on what cats kill is all there. To me responsible cat ownership is keeping a cat in a night. Or if it is in a barn securing it so the cat cant wander. I have a number of cat loving friends who live on country properties and they secure their cats at night. Where I live in WA the environment is fragile and there are a number of species already on the brink. I saw an article recently that says that we are currently in a period of mass extinction caused by humans.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    I live on a wetland nature reserve, hundreds of nesting birds here. That's fantastic environment for dogs, er, sounds like a disaster with a cat. And then to bring the catch home to present to a sleeping me? That'd be a disaster for the cat.

    Im thinking, for the wildlife, perhaps here is not a good home for a cat. Unless i kept it indoors. Roughly 20foot from my perimeter are the first nesting sights.
    Ive bought some Racumin recommended above as a interim. Whilst i give this more thought. Racumin doesnt bite or scratch, and im not scared of Racumin, other than chances of dogs eating it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •