View Poll Results: Your immediate thoughts /response to hearing the words Pit Bulls .

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  • Media experience.

    18 26.87%
  • Research/Media experience.

    13 19.40%
  • Friends/Family experience

    8 11.94%
  • Personal experience.

    28 41.79%
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Thread: The Words Pit Bull

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop View Post
    Perhaps because at one point in time your dog was in fact known as "Pit & Bull Terrier " .

    Are you aware that in many places around the world,The Stafford comes under the umbrella of BSL as a Pit Bull ie ; restricted breed? Along with the Amstaff.

    I for one think you need to go and do some research on your own dogs history at the very least. Which will then lead you into the Pit Bull world anyway.

    Ignorance is never,ever an excuse.

    Yes i know all about my dogs/ breeds history & i don't like it one single bit..but that's all history, the majority of Stafford's today are not bred for such cruel purpose anymore, except by scumbags who still use them for blood sports

    I'm not being ignorant, i'm just being honest about what doesn't interest me..we all have different interests etc, such as you "Chop" dont have interest in the same brand of cars as i do, & i'm not going to suggest that you show interest in HSV/ Holden & go & study their history etc just because i like them & you dont...

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Floyd View Post
    Yes i know all about my dogs/ breeds history & i don't like it one single bit..but that's all history, the majority of Stafford's today are not bred for such cruel purpose anymore, except by scumbags who still use them for blood sports

    I'm not being ignorant, i'm just being honest about what doesn't interest me..we all have different interests etc, such as you "Chop" dont have interest in the same brand of cars as i do, & i'm not going to suggest that you show interest in HSV/ Holden & go & study their history etc just because i like them & you dont...
    OK,really gotta run,do the school run...but just quickly ; this isn't a Holden verse Ford though.
    This is more Falcon verce Fairlane thing-still both Fords though.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NT
    Posts
    212

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    My immediate thoughts are of a lovely natured dog that is misrepresented thru the media.
    I cringe everytime i hear the word pitbull in the media because its all negative, and 98% of the time it isnt evan a pitbull.
    I only have been around them for the last few years, and have absolute respect and love for the breed.

  4. #24

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    Many thanks Anomad for your post and love that photo !
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  5. #25

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    OK,found the easiest bit on the Staffords history to read and understand.It is a bit simplistic but the general information is there

    History/Origin:
    The Staffordshire Bull Terrier first came into existence in or around the seventeenth century. As bull baiting declined in popularity and dog fighting enjoyed a surge of interest, it became necessary to develop a dog which possessed a longer and more punishing head than the Bulldog and also to combine strength and agility. It is therefore believed that the Staffordshire Bull Terrier was derived from the fighting Bulldog of the day with some terrier blood introduced. This cross produced what was known as the Bull and Terrier or Pit Dog. These dogs were renowned for their courage and tenacity and despite their ferocity in the pit were excellent companions and good with children. In fact it was not unknown for an injured dog to be transported home in a pram with the baby! Although dog fighting and other barbaric pastimes of the day were patronised by the aristocracy - Lord Camelford reportedly owned a famous dog called 'Belcher'- fighting dogs were also owned by the poorest of families. The pit dog was a favourite with miners and steelworkers and was prevalent amongst the chainmakers of the " Black Country " where the dogs were not only fought for entertainment but provided a working man with valuable extra income when worked against badgers or as ratters. With the introduction of the Humane Act in 1835, baiting sports and dog fighting became unlawful and a group of men in the Staffordshire area endeavoured to preserve their breed by introducing them to the show world. After much discussion the Standard was written describing the dog's physical attributes and this dog was named the Staffordshire Bull Terrier to differentiate him from the English Bull Terrier. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier was officially registered by the Kennel Club in 1935 and the first club show for the breed took place in August 1935 at Cradley Heath in the West Midlands where 60 dogs and bitches were entered . The founder club was named The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club and is affectionately known as 'The Parent Club'. There are now a total of 18 clubs in Great Britain and Northern Ireland ranging from the North of Scotland to the West of England. The breed received championship status in 1938 when CC's were awarded for the first time at the Birmingham National. The first two Champions of the breed were Ch. Gentleman Jim and Ch. Lady Eve. The popularity of the breed has now spread abroad with well established clubs in many countries including Australia, Eire, France, Germany, Holland, Spain and the USA, to name but a few. Over the years the Staffordshire Bull Terrier has become a successful show dog and a serious contender in the Terrier Group, where they frequently have the highest number of entries of all dogs in the Terrier Group and are occasional winners of Best in Show. More importantly the Stafford has become a popular pet retaining the attributes gained from generations of fighting dogs bred for courage, tenacity and most important: total reliability and affinity with people and in particular children.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

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    I think Choppa loves her Pit Bulls
    Education not Legislation

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    I think Choppa loves her Pit Bulls
    That obvious?



    I guess I just don't get though,owners who profess to know all about their chosen breed,profess to adore and love that breed but have something against 'another' breed that is so very closely tied to it
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NT
    Posts
    212

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    Damned good point there chopa. be intersting to hear the answer.

  9. #29

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    I agree Chop!
    I think that the general public perception (not mine) is:

    Oh! a pit bull - they're the aggressive ones, like to go for little kids
    Awww - a Staffy- they're the ones that many years ago had a magic spell put on them to make them into little angles. They're not aggressive are they?

    Have to come back later....always busy when there's action on here

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

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    My experience with Pit Bulls is based on personal experience. I usually take media hype with a grain of salt.

    I was working in boarding at a time when the media was busy creating an irrational fear of the breed in the mind of the general public. Most boarding kennels refused to accept a Pitty. We actually had a staff meeting and by one vote decided to board the breed on a trial basis.

    I worked with the big dogs and the problem dogs so I was naturally given the Pit Bulls to care for. With only one exception the many Pitties I cared for were a pleasure to work with. The one exception was a crossbred - a Staffy x Pitty. He was great with people but would have torn another dog apart. I found out afterwards he even had to be taken to the Vet via the back entrance. A scary dog. He lived to kill.

    The other Pitties were lovely dogs. One little black girl had been used for fighting. She was pretty mangled after a fight and left to die. The young couple who rescued her and nursed her back to health were warned she could never be trusted with other dogs due to her history. We talked about it and they decided to try her with a Pit Bull puppy. The black girl and her new companion were soon inseperable. They became two of my favourite boarders over the 8 years I regularly cared for them.

    Another Pitty boarder belonged to a Vet nurse. He lived with an elderly Kelpie x and a bossy little white fluffy. Lovely natured dog, kept firmly in his place by the two girls.

    There were lots of others but these three were my favourites.

    The sad thing about Pit Bulls is that many people attracted to the breed are not the sort of people who should own any dog regardless of breed. You can't blame the breed for this.

    IMO the average Pitty is no better or worse than the average GSD, Labrador or whatever. They are a dog like any other. To those who have no first hand experience of the breed I would say: Forget the media hype and go and meet one for yourself. You might be pleasantly surprised.

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