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Thread: Working Rottweiler vs Dane/Mastiff/Arab Cross

  1. #1

    Default Working Rottweiler vs Dane/Mastiff/Arab Cross

    I'm looking for a bit of advice when it comes to selecting our next dog. I have owned dogs in the past such as a working line American Bulldog and Bullmastiff and want to get some considered opinion on the pro's and cons between getting a work capable Rottweiler or Dane/Mastiff/Arab cross that will likely come from hunting lines. It will be coming into a home where it will be the only dog with young teenage kids. In short I have never owned a dog that comes from the breeds that occupy the very top positions of breeds considered the most intelligent of which the Rottweiler does. What am I dealing with on this front? Would the Rottweiler be on a completely different level when it came to trainability and general interactions?
    Any insightful commentary from people that have had exposure to both would be appreciated.

  2. #2

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    "work capable "

    you have one breed the Rott in modern terms specialised for one type of work and a salad mix of breeds that would be effectively impossible to predict the traits but lets assume the salad mix dog is specialised for hunting, the you have a hunting dog Versus either a show bred (pet) Rottweiler versus an actual working Rottweiler which I would expect to be useless at hunting.

    so which is it you want to be work capable, a hunting dog or a something else???

    the permutations available in a dane/mastiff/arab cross is almost infinite as far as traits go.

    please tell us the work capability you want the dog "work capable" for.

  3. #3
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    the only dog with young teenage kids
    I remember what me and my siblings were like as teenagers and it was probably just as well the dog we had at the time was an Australian Terrier and couldn't do a lot of damage even tho we deserved it many many times.

    I've never thought of Rottweilers as particularly intelligent. Loyal, protective, cute and slobbery and sometimes fierce - yes but intelligent, problem solvers and easy to train - nope. Now a Malinois... there's a dog that lives for work and training. And you definitely want a working line one. But again - a dog I would not let near teenagers.

    If you want a good guard dog - any of the mastiff would be good. But again - you'd need to train the teenagers to be respectful. They can do a lot of damage if you tease them beyond their tolerance limit.

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    If you choose a Rottie...do you intend the dog to be made part of the family and allowed inside because if not...don't get one.

    As for Working Rotties...many years ago Rotties as they were called then... Metzger Hund (Butchers Dog) herded cattle to markets in the days before the Railways and pulled carts too. Today not many people have cattle running around in their backyards...so keep this wonderful breed as beloved family pets.

    Raised correctly Rotties are great dogs...Intelligent...loyal...loving...great with kids and good watchdogs...Rotties are not guard dogs and tend to think before they act. I've only owned one but did some obedience training with the Rottweiler Club of NSW with my girl...so I learned much about them from people who have owned them for 30 years +.

    Rotties are slow to mature and don't till about three years of age...Training takes time...be firm but kind as Rotties don't like to be pushed...might be because of their stubborn nature...don't train a Rottie like a GSD I was told and carry a Rottie rag at all times to wipe off the slime that gets everywhere.

    If you want a puppy...please ring the Rottweiler Club in your state and if it's and older dog...have a look at pounds...shelters and rescue.

    Should also mention...keep your dog under control at all times in public because what you do with your dog reflects back on the breed.
    Last edited by Dogman; 05-01-2015 at 01:07 PM.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

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    I have an American book on Rottweilers printed in 1995 and it states..."Some Rottweilers are still employed by ranchers in Germany...the US and Australia".

    Just goes to show...you can't believe every thing you read...I doubt many Americans know where Australia is...let alone what we have on our "Ranches". Some Americans can't find their own country on a map....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj3iNxZ8Dww
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  6. #6
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    that's pretty funny Dogman

    But given what the Americans serve up and call "outback steak" - they have a pretty deluded idea of what is here.

    I have seen rotties herding. They're more gentle than my dog.

  7. #7
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    I have rotties that have worked. They are fantastic at scent, protection, tracking, herding. Other sheep dogs ive owned are BC's. A BC is far more gentle at herding than the rottie. She's a bit full on!

    Our hunts rabbits. For 4 yrs straight she's hunted most mornings with me. She's caught 2 rabbits in four years. YOu do the maths. My GSD literally is 100% more agile than a rottie, and you need agility to hunt. Rotties are not great at sharp turns, sudden pull ups etc. Crap hunters in other words.

    Mine does treiball, as i dont have livestock that are mine, and she's trained to ignore animals, or she'd be shot, but 2-3 times a year, she gets to bring in cows, and does it well. She's my 4th. And all would of been capable.
    HOWEVER: please ensure the terrain you work your rottie on, it surfaced, flat, no dips. AS the rottie skeleton can no longer support working, it breaks, very easily and expensively. So basically, to work a rottie on cattle, it must be done slowly, and on tarmac, so a car park would be a great place.
    I live rural mountainous volcanic rock everywhere to twist and bust a ACL just by living here. $4,750 so far in vet fee's for 'working my rottie'
    Good luck with that.

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    Rotties are in the Utility Group because they are a breed of many talents...the American book implies we had Rotties all over Australia herding cattle and sheep...which is just not true.

    Before the 1960s there were no Rotties in Australia and in the 1970s very few people knew what a Rottie was and had never seen one. The first Rottweiler Club was only formed in 1971 in Victoria and NSW in 1974 and SA soon after. Today we have many working breeds...but we don't all use them for what they were bred for.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  9. #9

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    I would like to get a female rott when I am too old for the sort of dogs I like now. Assuming I could find one without a deformed head and oversized body. I have trained a few for other people, good luck finding one that works. Have rarely seen one that is not excess baggage that literally has to lay down and recover after a few minutes. Three days work in a row and they are finished permanently.


    The rott in my experience is no longer a working dog by any stretch, they can make good visual detterents and that is about it Imo.


    Having said that the few nice ones I have seen were undersize and had normal shaped heads compared to the modern trend. A rott that can work is so rare in oz they are generally not even looked at in working circles.

    Exactly same as a Doberman, generally no longer considered a working dog.

  10. #10
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    I would like to get a female rott when I am too old for the sort of dogs I like now.
    I like to be able to lift my dog (in and out of the car) - so as I get older I imagine that's going to get harder. I can't lift a rottie now, so not sure I will ever get one.

    I've always wondered what people with un-liftable dogs do if the dog cannot carry itself for some reason (eg car accident or snake bite or bad dog fight).

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