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Thread: human aggressive dogs

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by muttboy View Post
    I choose not to make this a breed thing, others will do as they wish. I also reject the anecdotes of the protection stories, they are more likely wishful thinking. I am also not talking about abused dogs that protect themselves by lashing out in fear. I am talking about dogs with the genetic potential to engage and aggressor (human) on command and withstand high pressure until commanded to release. Most of these dogs are not naturally that protective and are reasonably social.they are high drive dogs with little or no bite inhibition to humans.

    Reject away lol, you wern't there. I have had quite a lot of cattle dogs over the years and I can assure you I know the difference between wishful thinking and reality. The majority of my cattle dogs would not have engaged an attacker, but I have had one that most certainly would have and did and I thank her to this day. She had good bite inhibition but when it came to a threat she was a very different dog. I travelled a lot of far flung places with her riding shotgun and if you had bad intentions towards me or my property she was not a dog to be messed with. She was a very high drive, strong smart dog and she definitely had good bite inhibition and would give warning before going up to the next level, so she is not the type that you are likely referring to I would think.

    I know the protection thing is highly debated, but I have been around dogs a very long time and have most definitely seen examples of this. So I know it is not wishful thinking.

  2. #12
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    I am finding this thread very unclear.
    What exactly are we discussing? A police dog trained to attack and hold? Many dogs fail that training so there is temperament and breeding to be considered in that case. A backyard hound that is trained to be aggressive towards intruders (junkyard dog) ? A home pooch who defends the family to intruders.
    What wishful thinking are you referring to muttboy? Anecdotes are all you have or anyone here, unless you are discussing a scientific study.
    Different countries have different breeds popular for a variety of purposes, gun dogs, service dogs, military dogs, police dogs etc etc

    A responsible breeder knows what they are breeding and why and who for. They are responsible about testing for genetic flaws and ensuring pups go to owners who will care for the dog in the way they should be. It doesn't matter if they are breeding poodles or GSD good practice is good practice.
    There are many tales of mutts adopted by soldiers over the years who have developed into very useful allies.
    If you want a specific discussion, be specific about the parameters of what you are suggesting. Your tone is rather belligerent and unnecessarily so, this forum does good debates with differing viewpoints respected. Otherwise I would not be a member.
    Last edited by farrview; 03-27-2015 at 08:03 PM.

  3. #13
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    Reminds me of a time years ago when I went to an All Breeds Dog Show...police had a Demo team there.

    I said to a cop "can I pat your dog"? To which he replied "No mate these dogs are trained to bite people".
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  4. #14
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    I am talking about dogs with the genetic potential to engage and aggressor (human) on command
    You've managed to contradict yourself in the same sentence...

    they bite on command and they have no bite inhibition?

    No bite inhibition - to me - means that puppy that clamps down on your ankle because it doesn't know any better. And when you reach down to detach it - it clamps onto your hand. If it got removed from it's litter too young before it learnt any manners - it will bite hard until someone teaches it not to. You can be gentle and teach a dog not to bite you. I just push my hand very slowly towards the back of it's throat until it lets go.

    I don't know of any dog that would clamp onto it's owner and chomp down all the time - (no bite inhibition) unless the owner never taught it not to and was in the habit of playing rough while fully padded up.

    Ie all the IPO dogs show no sign at all of attacking their owner or the judge or any spectators. They only go after the person they're told to go after. That's not bite inhibition or lack of it - that's TRAINING.

  5. #15

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    On command means control, not talking about wild animals. Sure lots of dogs have bitten people, I follow the stats globally. Most dog bites are from untrained dogs biting innocent people and children. By innocent I mean not a person the owner wanted the dog to bite, including the owner and owners family, friends, random kids.....


    To me anecdotes are incidents not validated by an external assessor under controlled conditions or for real life incidents at least a police report.

  6. #16
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    Then this is pointless as that is not achievable in a forum like this.The experiences and knowledge of the members is the only asset available. Who validates the credentials of the external assessor anyway? A police report is a written record of someones anecdote, signed by that person.
    If this is of such interest you could bring your evidence as a starting point for discussion. Why ask people what they think if you don't want to know?
    Getting irritable, will leave this thread.
    Last edited by farrview; 03-28-2015 at 11:49 AM.

  7. #17
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    So what is your point about guarding breeds then trained in protection? I'm assuming you mean Malinois, Dobermanns, Rottweilers, GSDs etc

    Should they not be bred? No. There is a place in society in the correct situation. For the past decade I have had them and in many situations I am glad I have.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  8. #18
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    As for your actual language and question there is a difference between human aggressive dogs and a trained protection dog. A dog that is an inherently aggressive nutter is a liability and needs a one way trip to the vet.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  9. #19

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    Sorry police will not get a conviction on anecdotes, hell police do not even accept a written confession signed by the perp. Yes external assessment is how they select guys too fly a rocket to the moon and land a jumbo jet full of tourists, we cant call god to make a judgement. Screw breed its just a marketing ploy, the only thing that counts is the dog at the end of the leash, the quality of training and the integrity of the testing. The rest is whatever you imagine.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by muttboy View Post
    Sorry police will not get a conviction on anecdotes, hell police do not even accept a written confession signed by the perp. Yes external assessment is how they select guys too fly a rocket to the moon and land a jumbo jet full of tourists, we cant call god to make a judgement. Screw breed its just a marketing ploy, the only thing that counts is the dog at the end of the leash, the quality of training and the integrity of the testing. The rest is whatever you imagine.
    The "anecdote" about the woman's Rottweiler chasing off the would be attacker on the beach was in the police report. I know because there was a serial offender in the dunes and I had a similar experience and had to file a report. They are still anecdotes relayed by the would be victims of this person. Very sadly the assessment process for pilots can also be flawed it appears.

    I think breed is important because of the types of dogs that have been selected and bred for protection work. I doubt if too many whippets for example have been bred with that in mind and I doubt you would see any on the police force for that work. It is no accident that certain breeds are selected for professional work. In the herding breeds I have worked with that are all high drive I can see distinct differences.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-29-2015 at 10:32 AM.

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