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Thread: Kelpie x beagle

  1. #1

    Default Kelpie x beagle

    Anyone had any experience with this cross? Looking at a very cute 6 week old boy puppy but struggling to find any info online on behaviour, temperament, weight when grown etc...

    Any info appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Embrace the gamble...

    I don't think anyone will be able to tell you what this pup is going to be like. I've got a Lab X Rottie X Kelpie. He looks like a Lab but has some very distinctive Rottie traits. His litter-sister has the goofiness of a Lab, but the boundless energy of a Kelpie - a rather difficult combo if you ask me.
    Last edited by margoo; 03-12-2015 at 08:20 PM.

  3. #3
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    Oh my goodness what a mix! I think Margoo has it, no information could be reliable as the cross could go any way. If you do get the pup I am interested to hear about the journey. You could get the best or worst of both breeds, or something gorgeous in between. Buy a lotto ticket while you are out.

  4. #4
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    Looking at a very cute 6 week old boy puppy
    OMG what a mix.

    Rule 1 - keep him with his litter until he is at least 8 weeks old - so he learns good dog to dog manners.

    Beagles can be very independent thinkers and prone to going off after a scent in a straight line for .... ie you do not want a Houdini beagle because once they find a trail - they stick to it to the bitter end. You can train them, you must train them, if you don't want to train a dog - don't get a beagle.

    Kelpies - there's quite a bit of variation - but they like having a job to do. Doesn't really matter what it is.

    Both dogs are super smart and will train you to do their every bidding if you're not careful. This can be hard to live with as dogs are about as good as making decisions in their own (long term) best interests as toddlers. What's mine is mine and what's yours is mine too. Again - training. very very important.

    Both dogs shed coat.

    Both breeds like to chase cats. Tho training can alleviate this.

    Kelpies may also chase anything that moves - joggers, bikes, cars - again - training. Only chase with permission...

    Beagles can be very greedy about food. Kelpies not so much but they do like food. Again - do not leave buckets of food out, measure dinner ration - should be all good.

    Both breeds like to run and run and run and run and run....

    Weight when grown - could be around 20kg or so ideally less... ie kelpies can be lighter than this if kept lean but it also depends a lot on what heritage they have. There's a wide variation in the size of a kelpie. Male beagles are supposed to be around 11kg ish.

    How sure are you that it is a kelpie x beagle? A lot of rescues make stuff up based on the dog's looks. Some kelpies do have drop ears. And some litters have more than one father...

    So beagles - fairly straight forward; but kelpies - huge variation in temperament from shy to confident, and in attitude from demanding to laid back.

    Have you met either parent dog - ideally both? Because that would be your biggest clue.

    Otherwise - if you like kelpies, and you like beagles and you're willing to give it lots of mental stimulation (trick training) and build up to quite a bit of exercise for the adult dog (puppies only need 5 minutes per month of age until about 6 months or you risk extra or early joint problems), then you could have a good home for this puppy.

  5. #5
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    Is there are reason you want this particular pup? Unless it is for adoption by a rescue organisation, it is an accidental litter or bred by a backyard breeder. It is certainly a gamble in terms of the pups temperament and possible health issues and the money will be going toward fueling the negative side of the dog industry.

    If you want a pup and aren't fussy about breed I would be looking at pups on PetRescue - Inspired by unconditional love - PetRescue. I know a few litters have been born recently due to pregnant bitches dumped in the pound and rescued into foster care. I would look at those. While the mixes are still a gamble, the money is going to the right people to help save more lives and one day end puppy farms, backyard breeders and irresponsible owners.

    Good luck with whatever you choose. We look forward to seeing pictures of your future dog.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I would argue the exact opposite. If NO one took dogs from pounds, byb's, petshops, unethical registered breeders etc AND ONLY bought from ethical registered breeders, there would be zero dogs in shelters! Buying dogs from rescue, pounds, byb's etc only makes the problem worse. It's time for some education and maybe even furthering the nanny state so that people can only buy from good breeders?

    Edit : Of course the initial cull would be horrid, but what about the long term? I have no idea of numbers but lets say we euth 10,000 dogs today and clear out the shelters/rescue/etc are we going to euth less dogs in the future with good laws about where people can buy their dog? How many less dogs will there be stuck living in cages awaiting the green dream if every breeder is forced to take back any dog that's no longer wanted? Think about it seriously!
    I see your point, and it is a very valid one. However sadly people will always buy puppies from BYBs. I do have very mixed feelings about that idea though... the initial cull would be horrendous... I've worked in a pound/animal shelter and it was devastating enough as it is, let alone having to euth every one of the dogs. As someone who likes to have purebred dogs from registered breeders, I was surprised to find myself completely smitten with a mutt (BC X a bunch of other working dogs... maybe even some GSD based on how he was walking). If my living situation had allowed, I would have taken him home without hesitation.

    The dogs in these pounds/shelters deserve a second chance, and even if it were possible to have people only get dogs from reputable breeders... I'd struggle supporting something that doomed all these dogs to death, even if it meant for a better future...

  7. #7

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    Thanks for all the advice everyone, we have decided that this one probably isn't for us! Onto the next one...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I would argue the exact opposite. If NO one took dogs from pounds, byb's, petshops, unethical registered breeders etc AND ONLY bought from ethical registered breeders, there would be zero dogs in shelters! Buying dogs from rescue, pounds, byb's etc only makes the problem worse. It's time for some education and maybe even furthering the nanny state so that people can only buy from good breeders?

    Edit : Of course the initial cull would be horrid, but what about the long term? I have no idea of numbers but lets say we euth 10,000 dogs today and clear out the shelters/rescue/etc are we going to euth less dogs in the future with good laws about where people can buy their dog? How many less dogs will there be stuck living in cages awaiting the green dream if every breeder is forced to take back any dog that's no longer wanted? Think about it seriously!
    Would an initial cull be required? I think that if breeding and purchasing dogs was regulated now it would then result in a better future with a reducution of further dogs in shelters. I guess I have picked up several really good working dog puppies from shelters whose only crime was to be born as excess puppies to working farm dogs and bought by people with a couple of acres who thought they needed a working dog and realised it was a big mistake.

    Not sure how you are going to regulate that one. The whole issue of working bred dogs is very different to the purebred pet market but many good quality working bred dogs still seem to end up in innapproriate homes. Working dog rescue has many of these types passing through. Many sport dogs are working bred dogs too and even though suburban are generally appropriate homes for these types of dogs. I also think in current new regulations in Victoria? they dont include people with less than 2 or 3 bitches? so I guess this still leaves it open for people to breed their pets. There would be an awfull lot of paperwork in a very regualted scenario. Not sure that there will ever be the capacity to do that in todays financial setting. Government departments are already being cut to the bone.

    The other issue I find despicable is the dumping of senior dogs. In some cases they may no longer have a breeder to go back to but have a lot to give to someone willing to give them a deserved loving home.

    I think there will always be a need for shelters but I do think the numbers of dogs passing through can be drastically reduced. it wont be easy though. Not all registered breeders are ethical breeders either, I can attest to that one, but I was pretty unsuspecting at the time due to my lack of experience. Everything looked good but it wasnt really although I am sure they are considered ethical breeders as they still have their registration. I learnt the hard way. I am sure some breeders could just simply euth dogs that were returned to them.

  9. #9
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    I get what you are saying MMJ. My point wasn't to remove the registered, ethical breeders at all. There are some rescue enthusiasts out there that say there should be NO dogs bred ever, which is just ridiculous. My point was that no cross breeding of said breeds would be a reputable, ethical, responsible breeder and therefore my personal opinion is that it should not be supported.

    If people aimed to purchase from the "correct" breeders and adopt from rescues/shelters only then there would be less if not zero dogs PTS due to lack of homes and the gene pool would benefit int he long run.

    In Europe (I think Switzerland, but I could be wrong) they have certain laws in place that mean all dogs must be microchipped by the breeder and the breeder is responsible for all vet work for dogs from their litters up until they are 3 years old. I'm sure this law alone would make people more willing to buy from registered breeders than cough up the bills from buying from the wrong "breeder".

    Dogs are not desexed over there and they have no overpopulation and minimal behavioural issues as a result. I'm not sure if it is illegal to purchase from anyone other than a registered breeder over there but their laws seem to be working for the better, because they can track the lines of any pup back through the database of microchip details.

    I would love to see something similar implemented here.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Pawfectionist View Post
    In Europe (I think Switzerland, but I could be wrong) they have certain laws in place that mean all dogs must be microchipped by the breeder and the breeder is responsible for all vet work for dogs from their litters up until they are 3 years old.
    I would assume the vet work is only for conditions resulting from genetic issues that could be reasonably screened for within the breeding program? I cant see why a breeder would have to pay for a situation that occurs because of irresponsible ownership or an accident. I would imagine that would result in nobody risking to breed for the public. Interesting as to how they would do that.

    Even in rigourously screened breeding programs hip and elbow dysplasias do sometimes occur and there is also an environmental component. An owner may grow their puppy to fat and fast and do too much exercise too young. Sometimes it is a genetic clash which has unexpected results. A breeder I know imported semen from the UK from a top working line to strenghten her lines. She used a very good bitch. The resulting litter threw several hip dysplastic puppies. They are still scratching their heads as to how that happened as both lines were very clean of HD and top workers. So more complicated perhaps than other genetic conditions where it would be reletively simple to establish the fault of the breeding program.

    Working breeders do occassionally cross breed to strengthen working traits and to breed working lines suitable for specific terrain or situations. It is not uncommon here to infuse a bit of NZ huntaway lines into kelpie lines to breed for specific traits. Sometimes it is done really well sometimes not so much.

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