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Thread: young dog

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Hi Paul

    So glad your partner is more understanding about little dogs.

    Something you can do instead of lots of exercise - is lots of mental stimulation (what Newfsie was saying).

    so lots of trick training - any trick will do... If you can spend about five minutes a day and maybe thirty pieces of something yummy - training your dog to do something from a nice stay to spins, begs, bark on cue, shake hands, roll over, play dead, its yer choice, collar grab (dog puts its neck in your hand when you put your hand out), fetch (hard for a terrier)... pick one thing then when that's good, pick something else. Google "shaping dog tricks" or youtube search kikopup - use the word "yes" instead of a click/clicker.

    And getting your puppy to work for her food eg put it into treat balls - make sure you have at least one more treat ball than you have dogs (or separate the dogs while the treat ball is in use). there is a cheap treat ball that works quite well but melts in the sun or there are some more expensive ones like my favourite is a bob a lot. There is also one called a squirrel dude tho it tends to spit out very small kibble too fast. Or you can mix dry kibble with yogurt or water or olive oil and pack that into a kong and freeze it.

    I had a friend who has Tenterfield terriers (also tiny) they take about an hour to eat a dried pigs trotter - my dog dispatches them in about 3 minutes.

    If you know anyone with horses that they get shod - see if you can get them to save the hoof trimmings for your dogs to chew on (my dog loves these and they last a little longer than pigs trotters). I think you can also buy cow hoofs. I'm not so fond of pigs ears because they are quite fatty and can lead to tummy upsets....

    Does your dog like carrot (you eat some then offer to the dog) - they could take a while to chew up (about a finger sized bit).

    You could possibly get a shell pool and put some sand in that and bury toys or kongs with food in there. Then you can take it with you when you move... it will kill lawn if you put it on that. If the dog digs anywhere you don't want - I find the easiest way to manage that is to put a brick or something hard to dig in the hole. My dog won't dig her own poop either so I sometimes bury that into the hole.

    Also - something that works about 12 hours - to stop cushion chewing - is vicks vapour rub. But you do have to reapply each day or each time you go out. It stings a bit to sniff - so discourages dog from chewing there. Aloe vera cactus or crib stop (equestrian supplies) also tastes horrid - even to a dog - so that may also help.

    A lot of aloe vera eaten at once is bad for a dog but most dogs won't do that because it tastes horrid. I use it on wounds to stop licking and promote healing.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    2,638

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul@eagleby View Post
    Angie is inside with me 80% of the day and really only outside to toilet or with our other small dog when we go out, you are so right with your advice, I have her in the bedroom at night, should I put her bed in the box?.... I am getting her desexed next week and hope this may calm her down a bit, but yes ur right about the adolescence, thanku thanku so much.
    Dont bet on the desexing calming her down. My dogs are all agility and working dogs and they are also all desexed. They are still all super high drive dogs LOL.

    I think following what has been already suggested is your best bet. If the desexing calms her down that will be a bonus but when I desex my dogs calming them down is not what I want. In fact it has been suggested in studies that desexing dogs makes them act like puppies for longer. I havent experienced this either. I generally see no difference at all. With my dogs it is all about the training. The higher drive dogs sometimes require more time and energy but are usually worth it. I love a really drivey dog. Mind you mine all seem to have off switches which is part of their breeding as purpose bred working dogs, but then they are not terriers!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    eagleby QLD
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    17

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    ahhh thanks, well she needs desexing anyway, so better now whilst shes young.... I love her energy and shes so much fun to be around, she makes me smile and laugh sometimes, shes hilarious, she buries things then digs them up and rolls in them and comes in smelly...but I accept its part of her breed, thanks so much for all your help and advice.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    eagleby QLD
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    wow thanks Hyacinth, such great thoughtful and tailored advice....I will definitely start putting things into practise, I agree with the food in a rubber ball or something, I think it will stimulate her as well as occupy, I have started playing fetch and tug of war with her early in the morning when its just us and she loves it and I am finding that shes a little bit better to handle as well as making me smile at her hilarious antics.

    The vicks/aloe idea is gold, thankyou, I had never thought of that and such a simple thing to do, I had been wandering about that.

    On a different note.... (just to let u know), I did rehome Mya with a wonderful family with 3 teen age boys, shes spoilt rotten and queen of their house, they walk her, take her to the beach etc... I was in hospital from Christmas day for 5 days and that's when they came for her, we were very careful about ensuring the right family and we waited it out until the perfect family came along, Mya was so thrilled to go and proudly sat on the back seat of their car like a queen.

    Then very unexpectedly about 5days later I was contacted by a friend asking if I would take Angie as he could not have 3 dogs and was facing eviction, I had not factored getting another dog into the equation but I am such a softie so I drove and hour to see Angie and she took to me straight away.... things are strange how they happen and I believe I was meant to rescue Angie and give her a good stable home and training.... shes a very manageable size for me and much easier for me to handle.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-16-2015 at 12:50 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

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    Hi Paul

    That is such a wonderful update to get - so glad you're optimistic about how this is going to work out - a big and happy difference to your previous threads.

    If Angie likes fetch and tug - you can use these as rewards for the behaviours you want when you're trick training.

    eg This is Susan Garrett and Swagger - her competition dog - when he was 6 months old.
    Tricks -
    self control - not stealing treats
    give and geddit
    play with the toy I say
    sit then release to tug (note the tug is very short and sometimes - it's the dog playing with the toy and not much help from Susan who had a shoulder injury - eg "kill dat ting" is as good a tug reward as you trying to hang on while the dog pulls your arm off. Tugs with bungee handles are better.
    recall
    fetch and tug reward
    selected fetch (and some trainers get their dogs to clean up the toys eg pick them all up and put them in a basket)
    remote (distance) sit and drop and stop (stop might be hard for a terrier) but you start this trick very close to the dog.
    reinforcement zone (RZ) ie heel next to me (on either side) - reward for being next to me
    if you reward a dog for being in front - you increase the chance they trip you up. But it's possible to teach a formal recall to front as well.
    and something that is great for a dog with a exercise challenged owner - teach the dog to go round a traffic cone or pool noodle on a toilet roll holder, or a toilet roll holder with toilet rolls on it ... then work on distance so you can send the dog tor run around different poles in the yard... in different orders according to where you point...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn1xmUzi0ak

    pool noodles - you can get the idea of this one but her placement of the treats is taking the dog away from the job and causing a bit of confusion - she'd be better to put the treat close to the pole on the path just ahead of where the dog needs to be...
    Start off by giving the dog a treat for looking at the noodle then looking behind the noodle (but give the treat so the dog moves further around the noodle to get it. Same if you use tug rewards.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEH34Omlr-s

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