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Thread: What was your first dog like?

  1. #11
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    Maybe some just get to you. I lost other pets but I didn't have a similar bond with them. Maybe it was just a lucky coincidence that my first dog ever is so tuned in with me. Rox, as cute as she is, is nowhere near as close to me as Nero is. He's talking to me all the time with his eyes. OH sometimes complains about it ("Neither of you is looking at ME like this!") And I find it very cute how Nero is taking care of me. When a stranger comes too close for his liking he won't leave my side anymore. Even if I throw a ball - he'll hang around until the suspect has moved on and is at a safe distance.

    And I agree, lucky if you don't have next door neighbours. I talk with my dogs all the time and know some people look a bit funny at me sometimes. And how sad for them. They obviously don't know what a treasure is dying of boredom in their backyards...

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    Maybe some just get to you. I lost other pets but I didn't have a similar bond with them. Maybe it was just a lucky coincidence that my first dog ever is so tuned in with me. Rox, as cute as she is, is nowhere near as close to me as Nero is. He's talking to me all the time with his eyes. OH sometimes complains about it ("Neither of you is looking at ME like this!") And I find it very cute how Nero is taking care of me. When a stranger comes too close for his liking he won't leave my side anymore. Even if I throw a ball - he'll hang around until the suspect has moved on and is at a safe distance.

    And I agree, lucky if you don't have next door neighbours. I talk with my dogs all the time and know some people look a bit funny at me sometimes. And how sad for them. They obviously don't know what a treasure is dying of boredom in their backyards...

    Losing a heart dog is one of life's most painful experiences is all I can say.

  3. #13
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    I take it the girl you lost was your heart dog?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    I take it the girl you lost was your heart dog?
    Yes she was. I love my other dogs but she was extra special and it is difficult to resolve the loss of a dog like that. However although I hate losing her, having her in my life was a total joy. That is the conundrum of loving a special dog. You know chances are that you are going to have say goodbye and go through the grieving process, they leave a huge hole in your life.

    I can never understand how people can dump old dogs. Old dogs are incredibly precious trusting and vulnerable and carry with them a bond that has been built over many years. The older my dogs get the more I love them and try and give then special consideration.

  5. #15
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    Never gets better, for each and all of them.
    All different and all hold a special place in your heart.
    be it giving them up or them being taken away, or loosing them.
    nothing will take away the time you have together and that's what matters.
    As long as you have done good by them as best you could, and hope for forgiveness for the mistakes by choice or accident, or trusting someone who never deserved in manipulating a mistake on you.
    Hopefully they will know in a way and forgive us, is all we can ask.
    And hope to see them again someday.

  6. #16

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    I had a dog growing up and whilst I felt that I loved him, well I didn't really feel like I had a strong connection with him or anything special like that. He lived for 14 years and when he died, well I was sad but honestly I wouldn't really say I was cut up over it. That probably makes me sound like a pretty bad owner but I guess I don't bond to all animals equally.

    I had a cat at the same time, and she was my partner in crime. She followed me everywhere, came on car trips with me, we moved out of home together and I was much more emotionally attached to her than I was to the dog.

    Then, 5 years ago, I got Sammy. I know Sammy is a dog, but my relationship with him is more akin to that with family members. He is a best friend and I feel like whilst we're different species, we're on the same wavelength. I can have basic conversations with that dog, which probably sounds even more crazy, but I couldn't even tell you how many words he has somehow learned. He'll do anything I ask of him. Just yesterday, we're on a boardwalk thing that had just over a meter drop to the water. Sammy does dock jumping and is part sea-lion so I asked him if he wanted to jump. He was a bit nervous, but more excited and so then I told him it was ok and he jumped. Swam to shore, ran around and that time when I asked him again if he wanted to jump he didn't just jump, he leaped off the deck. We had people cheering by the end because how many dogs do you know who trust their owners that much?

    I know I will probably never find another dog like Sammy. It scares me and I can relate to OP, I am very conscious of the fact that I only have maybe 10 years if I'm lucky with him left. For now people still think he's a puppy based on how he looks and his energy levels, which is pretty extraordinary for a mostly Doberman (a notoriously short-lived breed). I feed him the best food, lots of raw but really I think it's his spirit that keeps him youthful. If I could, I would choose him as my dog for life and extend his lifespan to match mine because I just don't want any other dogs now. I've had other dogs, I do a lot of work with other dogs, Sammy is one in a million.

    I honestly don't know how I will cope with his loss. I saw him get hit by a car once, I thought I watched him die and it was horrible. I've lost family members and honestly, again might make me a bad person but it was a pain similar to that. Anyway, I try not to think about it and just enjoy every day with him.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    I had a dog growing up and whilst I felt that I loved him, well I didn't really feel like I had a strong connection with him or anything special like that. He lived for 14 years and when he died, well I was sad but honestly I wouldn't really say I was cut up over it. That probably makes me sound like a pretty bad owner but I guess I don't bond to all animals equally.

    I had a cat at the same time, and she was my partner in crime. She followed me everywhere, came on car trips with me, we moved out of home together and I was much more emotionally attached to her than I was to the dog.

    Then, 5 years ago, I got Sammy. I know Sammy is a dog, but my relationship with him is more akin to that with family members. He is a best friend and I feel like whilst we're different species, we're on the same wavelength. I can have basic conversations with that dog, which probably sounds even more crazy, but I couldn't even tell you how many words he has somehow learned. He'll do anything I ask of him. Just yesterday, we're on a boardwalk thing that had just over a meter drop to the water. Sammy does dock jumping and is part sea-lion so I asked him if he wanted to jump. He was a bit nervous, but more excited and so then I told him it was ok and he jumped. Swam to shore, ran around and that time when I asked him again if he wanted to jump he didn't just jump, he leaped off the deck. We had people cheering by the end because how many dogs do you know who trust their owners that much?

    I know I will probably never find another dog like Sammy. It scares me and I can relate to OP, I am very conscious of the fact that I only have maybe 10 years if I'm lucky with him left. For now people still think he's a puppy based on how he looks and his energy levels, which is pretty extraordinary for a mostly Doberman (a notoriously short-lived breed). I feed him the best food, lots of raw but really I think it's his spirit that keeps him youthful. If I could, I would choose him as my dog for life and extend his lifespan to match mine because I just don't want any other dogs now. I've had other dogs, I do a lot of work with other dogs, Sammy is one in a million.

    I honestly don't know how I will cope with his loss. I saw him get hit by a car once, I thought I watched him die and it was horrible. I've lost family members and honestly, again might make me a bad person but it was a pain similar to that. Anyway, I try not to think about it and just enjoy every day with him.
    My old 14 yo dog I recently lost was just like that. She trusted me with every ounce of her being and would try anything I asked her to do and was up for anything as long as it was with me, boats, motorbikes, surfing, agility absolutely anything and she couldnt have cared less about doing it for treats. She did it because she loved doing stuff with me. The best dog ever. I had hoped I would have her for longer but one day she was fine, 2 days later I was euthanaising her. I still cant believe she is gone. I doubt that I will ever have her kind again. Miss super special.

  8. #18

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    We always had dogs when I was growing up - we had a lab, a foxy, miniture pinscher, brittany spaniel... but my first dog was a Jack Russell. Her name was Misha and she was beautiful. Got her as a pup... I also rescued a JR/Foxy cross called Billy - he was a bit harder work than Misha but he was a pretty good dog. When my now husband first moved in, he had a lab called Ally, so we were a 3 dog family! We had Billy put down as he'd started to turn (not sure what his background was but he wasn't a fan of men, had big issues with garden hoses and tried to bite our daughter), Ally passed away of old age (she was 14) and Misha was 11 when she died - i can't remember what the vet called it but was some type of infection... I still miss my girl!
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=7912&dateline=1420265  941

  9. #19
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    People talk about their "heart dog" - kind of like a canine soul mate... not every dog you own is a "heart dog".

    I'm not sure if Frosty is my heart dog - took a long time to like her and it took a long time before she did doggy smiles for me. I will be upset if anything bad happens to her. And I currently regard her as my biggest teacher. Every dog I meet benefits from what she's taught me or forced me to learn.

  10. #20
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    I have my "heart dog" right now, Oscar. He's my shadow and, like others have said, trusts me with his whole being. He would do just about anything I asked of him, no matter the fear. Tonight, being Australia Day and Darwin, we had fireworks. Saffie just takes herself to a quiet, dark place in the house and waits it out. Very sensible. Oscar sticks like glue to my side and I feel helpless that I can't make it better for him. A thunder shirt helps a little. He spent the first 4 years of his life doing everything with me, 24 hours a day, including being on a fishing boat for up to 6 weeks at a time, sometimes in cyclonic conditions (quite difficult, trying to keep a boat safe with a dog at your heel every heaving, wind-blasted, chain-clanking step of the way). Now for the past 5 years he hasn't been able to be with me at my job and his whole life is based upon waiting for when he can be with me, it feels like an incredible responsibility, that sort of love. It doesn't matter what I'm doing, Saffie will be asleep on her bed while Oscar follows me from room to room, around the garden, whatever I'm up to, he's there - not following, he always tries to anticipate where I'm going and is constantly walking in front of me. I'll shepherd, you follow.

    Now I am very aware of him hurtling far too quickly towards his twilight years, hip dysplasia now compounded by arthritis in his front legs. Despite all that he still turns into a bouncing pup at the sight of a ball. I really feel like my main job, in the next however amount of time we have, is to keep him safe (especially from other large, impolite dogs he has developed an intolerance for) and make his last years as comfortable and joyful as I can. But there is always a tinge of sadness seeing the inevitable drawing closer.

    Saffie, I love, but she is not my heart dog, maybe she will be one day though. My last heart dog was nearly 40 years ago while I was still a callow teenager. I hope Oscar has a better send off than poor Mootie, who disappeared at about age 5 while I was off chasing an adventure thousands of miles away without him. Presumed shot by a farmer, given his wandering, sheep herding ways. He has never been forgotten, and even people who have joined our family delight in "Mooti stories", despite never having known him. He was an endearing clown, Border Collie crossed with a Samoyed, all white with a black patch over one eye. I always thought his personality developed due to his clownish appearance. He lived for applause.

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