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Thread: The ultimate off-lead

  1. #11
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    When I was a child I had a lab x that was 100% reliable as long as he was holding the lead in his mouth. He was completely happy and wouldn't drop it even for a cat running past his nose. As far as he was concerned he was attached. It was comical to watch. The dogs in the video are so amazingly focussed, very cool.

  2. #12
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    You make a good point Hyacinth! I didn't really pay that much attention to the body language of them

    I wish off leash dogs were illegal here... but nooo.... I see more dogs off leash on the streets than I see dogs on lead! I think they're trying to change it though!

  3. #13
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    Mine have an ok recall but I wouldn't trust them on the road either. A rabbit is all it takes as far as Nero is concerned... I take them off the lead on dirt roads when I'm reasonable sure there is no car coming, or if I'd see it coming from far.

    We're having squillions of snakes this year. So I was very happy to see that both of them are seriously scared of them and don't approach if they see one. Nero spotted a brown snake on our walk last week. It moved slowly away from him across the path into the high grass and he just looked on from a safe distance, ready to bolt if it turned its head. I was so proud of my smart boy!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    but he's a sled dog - you need the right harness and one of these

    Aus Sled Dog Asn Photo Gallery
    My "goal" is to take him to the snow one day .. if not move somewhere it might snow occasionally. I'd be totally fine with that, and I'm sure Loki would be too

    Just far too hot up here to be doing any real strenuous activities like that with him - but he loves his evening walks and his spot on the lounge in the aircon

    Oh, and swimming! I bought an inflatable pool last weekend and put it on the patio, every time I go out, I come home to find him soaked and water everywhere. Can't keep him out of it

  5. #15
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    As Hyacinth says one of them appears to be wearing a shock collar from the look of it.

    Yes I have snakes on my property too. I try and stay to clear of bush areas. I did have 3 dogs go after one but fortunately they recalled as I saw it writhing between their legs. That was scary.

  6. #16
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    Are most vets prepared to treat snake bites? Does the same apply for dogs regarding trying to restrict the blood flow in that area to slow down the movement of the venom?

    My house doesn't back onto bushland directly, but it is just across the street. Have seen a small tree snake in the yard before, and reports of much larger ones around. Is there any way to train for this if you're not home for example? I had an idea of maybe getting a rubber toy snake and maybe somehow scaring him with it - but I don't know how effective that would be.

  7. #17
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    Those dogs are all on e-collars so technically they are not really off leash. The correction with the remote is faster then what you can hold back with a leash.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  8. #18
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    I think you can train 'leave it' with a rubber snake, but I'm not sure whether your dog would then leave it alone if you're not around? When Nero was a puppy he was naturally curious and tried to give a few snakes we came across a good sniff. I caught him a few times doing this and always acted very scared, running away screaming making a big fuss (not that I had to act a lot here). I have no idea if that helped in any way but I didn't know how else to teach him that Snakes are 'scary' and not just 'forbidden' and hence all the more interesting...

  9. #19
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    somehow I think my dog knows the difference between a snake and a piece of rubber. For her - the garden hoses and bike tires and etc have never been interesting...

    But a wiggly hissing stick - wow - that's exciting. Fortunately for me - she was on lead. I don't know if she would have stayed a safe distance from it or not. She does show interest in the blue tongue lizards in my back yard (much more snake like than a rubber hose), but they don't move as fast as the snake did - she doesn't get too close to those. And she keeps her distance from rats and cats and rabbits... just barks their ears off.

    I've heard of snake catching guys facilitating training "leave it" with a snake in a box - ie nobody can get hurt that way but the dog can see and smell the snake. Some of them use the shock collar to connect the snake with "run away" but - I'm not sure that some dogs wouldn't try to attack the source of their pain or fear given the (unsupervised) opportunity.

    I suspect out on various cousins' farms - it's a kind of natural selection - if the dog engages the snake and gets bit - it's removed from the gene pool... so only dogs that instinctively keep their distance get to live.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thingz View Post
    Are most vets prepared to treat snake bites? Does the same apply for dogs regarding trying to restrict the blood flow in that area to slow down the movement of the venom?

    My house doesn't back onto bushland directly, but it is just across the street. Have seen a small tree snake in the yard before, and reports of much larger ones around. Is there any way to train for this if you're not home for example? I had an idea of maybe getting a rubber toy snake and maybe somehow scaring him with it - but I don't know how effective that would be.
    Yes vets will treat snakebites if they have the anti vemon. However it is not straight forward and complications can arrise. I read about one cat that had so many complicatins the vet bill ran to $27000. My friends bill was about $5000. After a snakebite you really need complete immobilisation of the patient, which is difficult in a dog.

    I live too far from a vet to make it on time so am very concious that if a snake bites, my dog is dead. My neighbour got bitten once and they sent the Royal Flying Doctor for her.

    Some dogs seem afraid of snakes, one of mine is, but the rest would pounce if it wriggled. I have had two close encounters, but the snake was really just trying to get away. Round here there are always dogs lost over summer. Snakes will often get into working dogs runs chasing water. People are tending to build raised kennels. I have put snake mesh around where I leave my dogs when I am out and hope that reduces the risk.

    One of the reasons I dont like summer out here apart from the extreme heat.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 11-21-2014 at 08:09 PM.

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