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Thread: Mini schnauzer allergies. Anyone else dealing with this?

  1. #1

    Default Mini schnauzer allergies. Anyone else dealing with this?

    Hi everyone
    I have a miniature schnauzer who is having allergy issues that are driving me crazy.
    She is an itchy scratchy dog particularly autumn/spring. Recently came out in hives on 1/2 her body only so obviously a contact allergy in the garden. She has been on supercoat sensitive skin and stomach with raw mince and raw vegies I add.
    As she has also had issues with anal glands needing attention every 3 months or so I have started to change her over to vets all natural.
    Other behaviour she exhibits is a lot of scooting even after the glands have been cleared (worms are not the issue) paw licking and chewing and random vomitting autumn/spring. She has always been inclined to lick herself from head to toe daily like a cat. After a recent random vomit I starved her, except for a dry dog biscuit, then fed boiled rice, boiled rice and chicken and now introducing her regular diet with items I am sure are okay for her to eat.
    Does anyone have any other suggestions in working this out?
    Is allergy testing in a dog an easy thing to do? Is it a blood test? Has anyone tried this?
    I queried her symptons with the breeder when she was a pup ( she is 6 now) and was assured that her dogs and their offspring had no issues like this. I am wondering how I got the only allergy dog she ever bred!
    Any advice or insight greatly appreciated.

    Schnautz's mum.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Poor girl. My mother had a poodle mix that had similar problems with the licking, itchy paws and scooting and tummy upsets although not as bad as your description for most of her life. She tried all sorts of different and often expensive diets including raw and nothing really helped and often had to put her on chicken and rice.

    A vet I know suggested putting them on kangaroo and potato diet for 4 weeks or so and then slowly introducing items of their regular diet one by one to see what they have a reaction to

    I also had a dog with some allergies. I had her tested by a specialist and they identified several allergins and made up a series of injections to desensitise her. I think it helped because she did improve considerably. But she was allergic mainly to grass pollens and fleas not to food.

  3. #3
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    The contact allergy side of things might have something to do with plants or grass in your garden and lawn. I know 'Hyacinth' ...a member here has grass issues with her dog . Heres a bit of a list of plants that are dangerous to dogs. Its american but alot of these plants are here too. My guys had issues with a ground cover called 'Moses in a cradle' but i cant remember its real plant name.

    Pet Poison List - List of Pet Toxins for Dogs and Cats


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Yup

    I put out a tarp with a beach towel on top for my dog to lie on instead of the grass.

    If she belly drags on the grass - we have lots of itching problems and if I let it get out of hand - the rash is frightening.

    Things that help us.
    keeping her off grass especially not belly dragging. Just paws isn't so bad.
    plenty of beach time
    aloe vera cactus - squeeze the goo directly from the leaf and wipe over affected areas where she licks. It stops licking and helps healing. Mostly it tastes foul. Lots of aloe vera - is a bit toxic but a little bit is ok.

    Nekhbet recommends Calendula (daisy) tea - spray/soak dog all over with a mix of tea and water (one cup strong tea to bucket of water?) and then allow to air dry. Can get the tea from health food shops.

    I'm not sure about the air drying... I think I might try putting the mix in a squirty bottle and see if that helps.

    And there are several ointments you can get from the vet as required.

    I also sometimes use dermaveen oatmeal ointment for eczma (scuse spelling). It looks like vasalene but isn't.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    except for a dry dog biscuit, then fed boiled rice, boiled rice and chicken and now introducing her regular diet with items I am sure are okay for her to eat.
    Get rid of those carbs. For an itchy dog they do them no favours particularly supercoat.

    Your dogs diet is way too varied to know if something is contributing or not. OK the dog is obviously seasonally allergic but at the same time the anal gland issue says diet is not working.

    As for the scooting, your dog scoots then irritates the skin around the anus. This causes itching and probably a minor infection so the dog scoots more, irritates more etc and it doesnt end. It's like scratching a mosquito bite, the more you scratch the longer and uglier it gets.

    Email Dr Bruce Syme from Vets All Natural and see if he has advice for you as well. He's a lovely man.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  6. #6

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    Hi everyone

    Thanks for your feedback. At this point I am feeding her a pretty plain diet (vets all natural,raw meat and rice) which I know is well tolerated by her. I am then going to introduce items one at a time to see if I can determine culprits. An elimination diet I guess.

    I emailed Dr Syme using the contact form on his web site but received no response. A very busy man I imagine. I have emailed again so hopefully I can get some further advice. My vet does not have a lot of experience with this.

    Shelby is pretty much a house dog only outside for playing ball, walking and toileting. I often wonder if I moved house if some of this would disappear.

  7. #7
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    If you're using the VAN dry mix your dog doesnt need rice. Get the idea of carbs out of your head they're nutritionally moot for a dog - they're fatteners and a little bit of fiber. Most dog things are made of carbs though like kibbles, biscuits and treats because they're cheap to use and the profit margins are huge. Supercoat is owned by Nestle, so are a few other brands they have gathered like Bonnie, Pro Plan etc. Used to be good stuff when first released then the quality just went to nothing better then chicken feed.

    Wholegrain cereals (sorghum, oats, rice, corn) and/or cereal by-products; fish and fish by-products (tuna and/or salmon), and animal fat; vegetable proteins; minerals and vitamins (including, calcium carbonate and/or phosphoric acid, sodium chloride and/or potassium chloride; vitamin E, zinc sulphate, ferrous sulphate, niacin, copper sulphate, manganous oxide, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, vitamin A, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, potassium iodide, vitamin D3, cobalt carbonate, sodium selenite, vitamin B12; choline chloride); beet pulp; garlic, rosemary plant extract.

    This is the ingredients list of supercoat. Most of it is indigestible particularly the sorghum, and the corn/vege protein is only in there to bump up the protein content to 22% which is quite low for an adult dog. I would say you're lucky to get a few percent dry weight which is actually fish and that is being generous.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  8. #8

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    Hi Nekhbet

    I was only using the rice to transition her after she had been sick.

    Re supercoat yep thats why I was glad to find out about the vets all natural and bought the sensitive skin mix. I have always added raw grated zuccinni, cooked pumpkin etc to her food so she gets fresh food. Bones have been a problem. I follow the mini schnauzer lovers site who recommend lambs neck. I got it cut into sections but she seemed uncomfortable after eating it. Only gave a small amount and watched her eat it in case she tried to scoff it. I can't feed chicken necks because she tries to swallow them whole. Last summer I fed frozen chicken wings which slowed her down and will do that again on hot days. I've also noticed that she tends to burp within about 1/2 an hour of eating. I am going to get a slow down bowl to see if that makes a difference.
    She loves sardines which I have given her but don't know if the oil they are in might be upsetting her. I will test her on that. She has never been able to handle fat on meat etc and will throw it up so I try and keep her on a low fat diet.

  9. #9
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    roo meat has very little fat in it but it's not a complete diet for dogs (or cats).

    You can get sardines in "spring water" which would be less oily than olive oil but they're still an oily fish. And oil is a liquid fat.

    we all need some fat in our diet (dogs included) but it's finding the right balance and the right kinds of fats or oils.

    I would not feed my dog lambs neck because she makes spinters out of any bit of lamb bone - except maybe brisket bones (the soft tips at the edge of the ribs furtherest away from the spine). Haven't tried those yet.

    I did get away with feeding her a frozen turkey neck. I did also cut back on her dinner ration that day. She couldn't swallow it all at once or make crumple bites in it so she could fold it up and swallow it whole (what she does to chicken wings). So I guess that was a winner. I did have to wait a while after I got it for a day where I could be home and feed it to her outside. No way do I want her minging on a bone inside at home. Yuck.

    So I might try the turkey neck again some time.

  10. #10
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    I think the reason the vet suggested roo meat is because it is usually not something a dog has already been exposed too and generally not potatoes. So if you put them on roo and potato for a short time you then start adding in other elements to try and determine what food is causing their allergy. It was certainly not suggested as a forever diet, just one that might help to sort out what the problem ingredients in their current diet are.

    Of course if the dog may have sensitivity to allergins other than food which is where the allergin testing was helpful for one of my dogs.

    Some dogs are highly sensitive to fat. My mothers poodle mix was and she ended up with pancreatitis and diabetes which resulted in her death. So proably worth trying to sort it out.

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