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Thread: agitated dog

  1. #1

    Default agitated dog

    i have a Malamute X shepherd about 5 1/2 months , today she seems very agitated, panting abit & doesnt really want to sit down & relax for to long , its definitly out of character for her , but she stil has alot of energy & apart from the symtons seems very happy ?

  2. #2
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    As long as you know she hasn't eaten anything like chocolate or medications watch her. Vet is always the safest bet if you have a worry.

  3. #3
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    Sounds like when my old Ridgeback chewed his first canetoad. He was drooling heavy too. Hope she's ok.


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  4. #4
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    If it is a possible poisoning take it seriously. Agitation and shaking can cause them to overheat and the internal organs shut down. I lost a young dog that way.

  5. #5
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    If its poisoning, you wont know. So how do you take it seriously?
    I mean, i know its serious. But being a keen bush walker, i asked vet for antivenom for my hikes. I was advised, i cant as it goes off unless refridgerated, but vets advise on poisoning: snakes, spider etc. went like this: "if its serious, you live to far out to save your dog, if its not, your dog will survive to get here, its a black and white science of time, roughy twenty minutes of time".

    GSD's are a sensitive bunch of dogs. Does not take a lot to put their nose out of joint.
    mine is currently showing signs of distress, as there is a fishing competition going on, roughly 10 min walk from my house. He's not happy at strangers around, hence whining, unsettled, asking to leave property, pointing in direction of 'intruders', circling, sitting getting straight back up, panting, pacing.
    And the toxin is a healthy male fisherman.

    Wonder how much a vet would of charged do diagnose this?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    If its poisoning, you wont know. So how do you take it seriously?
    I mean, i know its serious. But being a keen bush walker, i asked vet for antivenom for my hikes. I was advised, i cant as it goes off unless refridgerated, but vets advise on poisoning: snakes, spider etc. went like this: "if its serious, you live to far out to save your dog, if its not, your dog will survive to get here, its a black and white science of time, roughy twenty minutes of time".

    GSD's are a sensitive bunch of dogs. Does not take a lot to put their nose out of joint.
    mine is currently showing signs of distress, as there is a fishing competition going on, roughly 10 min walk from my house. He's not happy at strangers around, hence whining, unsettled, asking to leave property, pointing in direction of 'intruders', circling, sitting getting straight back up, panting, pacing.
    And the toxin is a healthy male fisherman.

    Wonder how much a vet would of charged do diagnose this?
    You know your dogs agitation is fear of the fishing activity. If your dog was a confident dog unconcerned of such things you then may need to question. Sure if my dogs get bitten by a snake they are dead because of where I now live. My experience was my dog licked a toxic sea slug on the beach. I didnt know this and later when I got home she was agitated and shaking and panting. She was a very fearful dog of strangers but this was very different as there was nothing there to be concerned about.

    I took her to the vet but the shaking and panting combined with the hot weather had already overheated her internal organs beyond the point of no return, regardless of the sedation and ice they used to try and save her.

    I take very seriously a dog that is agitated and in particular shaking, panting, shivering for no known reason as this can overheat their internal organs quickly.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-12-2014 at 06:11 PM.

  7. #7
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    Or bloat..............please get it checked
    Pets are forever

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