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Thread: Labradoodle close to being classed as pure breed

  1. #11
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    The ANKC has its place in trying to foster ethical breeders although they are far from perfect as discussed, but they do bring in thigs like compulsory health testing for at risk breeds and they have a code of ethics.

    My point around working dogs is that these breeds dont need to be recognised by the ANKC to be a recognised breed. Working breeds have their own registries and as with the Working kelpie council their top rated breeders have to be be proven breeders of dogs that are guaranteed to be top notch working dogs. The ANKC is a distraction from the true purpose of these dogs.

    Look some of the showbred Border collies are nice ethically bred dogs that excel in agility and dog sports, but they wouldnt be my choice for a farm working dog as they are rarely bred for that purpose.

    I find it hilarious that in the ANKC system doesnt recognise my working bred and registered kelpies and Border collies as those breeds when I enter agility or herding comps. Their breed is officially "sporting register", one up from associate register which includes anything not on a recognised register.

    I am not sure that ANKC breeds need a purpose other than to conform to a physical breed and temperament standard and for the breeders to follow a code of ethics. Probably not a bad thing for a dog like the labradoodle.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-16-2014 at 12:05 PM.

  2. #12
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    We ave the same issues with newfoundland dogs..some are even afraid of water and many have lost their natural rescue ability and many now have the Poofy coats, which are hell when you hit the water every day. Bring back the standard for the purpose the dog is bred for. Stop changing it for prettiness sake. Soundness and for working dogs their workability is a must...........
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    We ave the same issues with newfoundland dogs..some are even afraid of water and many have lost their natural rescue ability and many now have the Poofy coats, which are hell when you hit the water every day. Bring back the standard for the purpose the dog is bred for. Stop changing it for prettiness sake. Soundness and for working dogs their workability is a must...........
    This is where working registers are better to maintain the true version of the working dog. I think it would be impossible for showbreeders to actually test for workability. The heavy, fluffy showbred Border collie coat would be hell on a real Australian farm, I know I have had one and I used to have to clip it all off. You might be able to do a little instinct test with it on several sheep but that has nothing to do with true workability, for this you need farm work and knowledge. I think that a working dog can only really be bred by people who work the dogs and can assess their traits. You cant cull a beautiful working dog because it has a few white hairs on its chest that doesnt conform to some colour standard, or because it is a centimetre too big. My working bred BC is 3 cms taller than the ANKC standard, but he is a wonderful casting dog with a huge stride and will pick up all the sheep in a 100 acre paddock from gullies, bush etc and bring them to me standing waiting a km away.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-16-2014 at 01:25 PM.

  4. #14
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    I actually think we should have the conformtion showing and have the breeds working also done as a "test", be it stock work, Gundog, Rescue work or whatever.....wouldn't that put the cat amongst the pidgeons. I also show mine, but I really love the water work. And to me the most important part of a good newfoundland dog is character and friendliness...it is part of the breed standard and now we find ttimid and aggressive lines..they should NOT be bred.
    Pets are forever

  5. #15
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    Depends where the dog comes from too I guess. If I wanted a working dog to herd sheep on my farm, I'd probably get one from another farmer that does just that with the parents. if I want a companion dog, I'll get it from someone that lets their dogs lay around the house, sit with them on the couch in the evening etc, and if I wanted one to show, I'd get it from a breeder that also shows. Whether they're a registered breeder or not, I'm not all that concerned, as long as I know the parents are free from serious health problems, and that the breeder(s) aren't abusing the dogs and pumping out puppies every cycle just to make a quick buck, if they have a dog that fits my needs, then I'll probably go to them.

    My boy, being a husky, I expected him to be constantly hyper, jumping off the walls and over fences etc, but he's the biggest couch potato, and I'm happy with that, but I also know that the breeders mentioned the parents were the same, indoor, calm and just want company type dogs, which is why I decided to buy from them. I don't live anywhere near snow, so I don't need a dog wanting to pull a sled for hours on end, and I'm not into showing, so a companion was my pick, and I got exactly that

  6. #16
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    And I'm sure a majority of dog owners these days want a dog like that, Thingz! That would be a funny test, if purpose was tested at shows. Rows of couches with dogs chilling out with their humans watching TV. Lol!

    I have a dog that's eager to please and a fairly fast learner, yet is very good at chilling and also quite resilient and not at all prone to anxiety. They are genetic traits that I value highly in a family pet dog. But it wouldn't be easy to selectively breed traits like that, I suppose? Pretty hard to test for...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    And I'm sure a majority of dog owners these days want a dog like that, Thingz! That would be a funny test, if purpose was tested at shows. Rows of couches with dogs chilling out with their humans watching TV. Lol!

    I have a dog that's eager to please and a fairly fast learner, yet is very good at chilling and also quite resilient and not at all prone to anxiety. They are genetic traits that I value highly in a family pet dog. But it wouldn't be easy to selectively breed traits like that, I suppose? Pretty hard to test for...
    Well those are also traits I value in a good working dog. The top breeders will tell you that business and hyperactivity while working is a fault. A busy dog just wears itself out and upsets the livestock. You want calmness and minimal movement but the ability to read stock and understand the pressure bubble, but also to be able to react very quickly combined with willingness and stamina to work all day and the ability to chill when not working. These traits are selected for by good breeders. A couple of breeders I know do not tolerate anxiety or poor temperaments in their dogs and will cull ruthlessly on this regardless of anything else.

    With conformation, I dont think it is possible to have a very limited physical type for a working dog because different environments will often favour different coat types and builds. I like a tall lean dog with good bone and short coat and the ear set is irellevant, my BC looks absolutely nothing like the ANKC standard for a BC, but is undeniably a working bred BC to look at. He is also very good at laying around the house when I am out all day, but working his little heart out when the occassion calls for it. Although he wouldnt be suitable for a family that wanted just a couch potato. However neither he nor my kelpie are those highly strung types full of nervous energy with weird temperaments.

  8. #18
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    I totally agree kalacreek.....Our dogs were the laziest dogs around when not working, on the couch (Kelpies and ACD's)....And our newfies are the same.they love working when on the beach, going for long walks and swimming anytime, but the house means, shut-down time, sleeping or just chilling. Most of any breed of dogs we have ever had has been like that ..........
    Pets are forever

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