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Thread: Advice for owning first time owner of a Malamute.

  1. #1

    Default Advice for owning first time owner of a Malamute.

    Well hello forum people.

    I was wanting some further advise from some malamute owners as im looking at getting one.

    I currently own two Labs and foster one. I have fostered god knows how many more for guide dogs vic and customs so i no stranger to caring for dogs... But Labs are nothing compared to Malamutes.

    I would much rather adopt one but finding it hard to find a suitable one (Most at listed as needing to be an only dog) so also starting to look at puppies.

    I was hoping some people here could be a first time owner some more advice. I know they are High maintenance dogs that require ALOT of exercise and can be destructive when they get bored and all that stuff.
    So is there any other tips worth knowing about this breed. Eg tips for rehoming them. I was thinking of crate training to make sure the dog does not dig out or anything like that while im at work until the dog is "settled" for lack of a better word.
    Any tips for keeping them occupied when i am at work? Is exercise best done in for morning or a good long run in the evening suitable?

    Seems like a stupid question but are they the type of dog that will get involved in puppy play fighting or are they a breed that will get a little "defensive" as my two younger Labs LOVE to play fight.

    Diet was something i was finding it hard to get info on. How much dry food should they be fed? One or twice a day ect. Any food treats that are a big NO?

    Anything extra to know about grooming. I am aware they need a daily brush. Just anything extra worth knowing.

    Also puppies, Anything to know about them? Raising and training them ect.

    And last of all, Any good tips for when the real warm Melbourne weather rolls around? Keeping them cool ect. Should walks be kept to a minimum?

    Cheers for the help.

  2. #2
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    Hi. My sister had a Malamute bitch. They didn't do much training with her so she was wilful, snarky with kids, escaped every chance she got, chewed anything in existence, crapped all over the bricks instead of the garden, hated all other dogs etc etc. With training, she might have been a lovely dog. I am sure you will get more detailed advice from those better qualified to do so.

    good luck!

    Adrian
    Last edited by Ados; 09-13-2014 at 08:49 PM.

  3. #3
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    "The Malamute retains more of its original form and function than many other modern breeds.The Malamute personality is one of strong independence.This dog has a long genetic foundation of living in the harshest environment imaginable, and many of its behaviors have adapted to survive in such environments. Independence, resourcefulness, and natural behaviors are common in the breed." - Wikepedia
    Talk to malamute rescue, they won't be suitable for anyone and may not be what you hope.Training is very time consuming and you would need guidance as to how to go about it for the breed. The ones I meet down the beach with Maggie are NOT sociable ( but then border collies are snobs too so i don't take offence).
    Probably be a great pet with that in place

  4. #4
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    Why the switch from labs to malamutes? I know nothing about them from an owners point of view but from what I have read they would not be my type of dog and I would personally give them a very wide berth LOL. I would also think of some type of working activity, maybe sledding or something. I know they do that in Australia, just not sure where.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-14-2014 at 11:51 AM.

  5. #5

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    For me its not so much a switch from labs. Iv always wanted one. Only reason we have labs is from guide dogs and customs foster care programs. Had a couple that couldnt continue to be trained for various reasons so we bought them. So they were more of a choice swayed by the kids who loved them. As for my self iv always had soft sport for Malamutes & Huskys. Iv met a few walking around and they seemed VERY friendly but i didn't have dogs with me.

  6. #6
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    I haven't got any experience with Malamutes, but from what i've heard they need an experienced owner with a good training method. I too wouldn't ever go for a malamute, mostly because of their personality and how difficult they can be to train (so i've heard at least) but also because of their sheer size... I wouldn't want to end up with with a dog that big who won't listen to me.

    I agree, contact a rescue or breeder and get chatting to them, meet some dogs and get to know the breed. The people who are involved with the breed will be able to tell you whether they think you're up to the challenge

    I have no doubt that a well trained Malamute would be an absolutely wonderful family companion!

    Regarding grooming... I've never had any Malamutes come to my grooming business, but I can imagine they would shed quite a bit, particularly in spring. Make sure you brush regularly, gotta get out all of that loose undercoat so that the dog's coat can breathe and keep the dog comfortable, especially in summer.

  7. #7
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    I do remember when I used to walk the streets in the evening with my dogs after work occassionally meeting a male malmute. He was always on his own so obviously taking himself for a walk. He wasnt dog aggressive with my dogs and was sort of non committal friendly but you could see in his eyes he was on some sort of a mission, maybe a bitch on heat somewhere.

    I also met a teenage boy down the dog club with a husky and he used to do marathon walks/jogs with this dog. He told me he would jog for miles with it. Probably did the boy and dog both good. This dog also seemed okay with other dogs, but it was getting plenty of exercise with the boy.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    but from what i've heard they need an experienced owner with a good training method.
    Thats the hard part.Its like going for your first job. Everyone wants experience but you cant get the first job to get the experience. So its making it hard.

  9. #9
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    Well my first dog was a working bred cattle dog but I was prepared for the fact that I was going to have to spent a lot of time on her. I was very lucky in that she had a dream temperament but she kept me very busy in the exercise stakes! I think you just have to be very prepared, do your research and make sure you get one where the breeders have made temperament a high priority.

  10. #10
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    I agree with what Kalacreek said.

    I do understand what you mean about the first job thing though. From what you have told us, I would say you are an experienced dog owner, and probably quite a good trainer as well. That is solely based of what you have told us.

    I really do suggest you get in contact with people who own malamutes and learn the ins and outs of the breed before you buy. Do heaps of research, and make sure you learn the good and the bad of the breed. Thats a mistake I made when I bought my first dog (An Australian Shepherd) I knew how much exercise, mental stimulation, and training they need and I was prepared for that. But I never really spoke to many people who really knew the breed and could tell me exactly what its like living with and training them, and what can happen if things go wrong.

    Here's a link to a Malamute rescue (you've probably already seen it though) I'm sure they'd be very willing to help you find the right dog if you contact them.
    alaskan malamute rehoming aid aust. inc. - Home

    Otherwise you could look at this site and find a breeder in your area. Get to know the breeder and their dogs before you buy, make sure that the temperament of the parents are what you would want in a dog, and as Kalacreek said, look for a breeder who's got temperament as a high priority

    https://www.dogzonline.com.au/breeds...n-malamute.asp

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