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Thread: Does your dog have a sense of humour?

  1. #1
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    Default Does your dog have a sense of humour?

    I know it's major anthropomorphism, but I often think dogs do have a sense of humour.

    Today I took the dogs for a long walk, which included a stepping stone crossing over the creek. The foster pup (a 5mo sooky staghound) missed a step and fell into water up to her neck. When she'd dragged herself out, looking rather shocked and bemused, Banjo promptly body barrelled her, knocked her off her feet and then proceeded to do zoomies like a lunatic. I'm sure it was her way of saying, "Haha! You. Idiot!"

    It was extra funny because another dog owner had witnessed everything from the other side and was laughing too. And her dog kept crossing back and forth to see what the crazy dog was doing and looked equally confused and excited.

  2. #2

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    Ha, Thats cute!

    I think we go too far trying NOT to anthropmorphize and might be be missing out on a lot because of it. And I'm sure a lot of dogs have a very well developed sense of humour.

    My old girl was a crack up, she even had a "silly walk".( rolled her eyes, walked with high, steps, legs kept straight and swing her head from side to side with each step) She was never allowed on the furniture, tho' she was an inside dog. two times in her life she broke that rule and both times it was playing chasings with the kids. She'd race after them barking and growling( they all loved that game) Both times the kids raced into the corner and pulled the lounge chair in front of them then said "nyah nyah, you can't get me." Both times she just leaped over/on the chair.
    If the kids lay on 'her" bed, she would get a silly wiggle and cover them with her blanket! She even took to sliding down the lino in the hall with the kids.

    And if any want to say thats just anthropmorphising, Thats just sad.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange fruit View Post
    I think we go too far trying NOT to anthropmorphize and might be be missing out on a lot because of it

    .
    I would tend to agree. We know dogs are not humans but I often recognise the emotions that flick across my dogs faces or in their body language. Dogs have developed socially with us for a very long time. I had an Arab horse once and he most definitely had a sense of humour, he liked making me laugh and he did the most un horselike things at times. One dog trainer said that unless it was proven scientifically otherwise he believes that dogs are no more than conditioned machines. Well brother I think you are missing out on the many subtle interactions that we can recognise in our dogs (and horses).

    Sure it is wrong to anthropmorphise dogs in silly ways that some people do, but I believe we share many basic emotions and it will differ in level among individual dogs and breeds.

  4. #4
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    When I was a teenager, I used to take our big male GSD for walks. I vividly remember one occasion when we approached a woman who was standing looking at one of those street map billboard things. She couldn't see us. The moment we were about to pass her, our dog let out an almighty woof, which made her jump back and squeal. Our dog just kept walking. I'll never forget the look on his face. He was definitely grinning. He repeated that trick at other times, but that's the one I can recall in detail.

  5. #5
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    I have 2 tug toys I play with my boy in the yard, so I have one to throw and he can have one to hold. Usually I'll throw one and he'll run off with the other one still in his mouth, and drop it where the other one landed, bringing only 1 back, meaning I end up being the one having to go fetch it. Dunno if he's trying to be funny or getting revenge

  6. #6
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    Well I think Oscar definitely has a sense of humour, Saffie less so. I remember walking Oscar on the beach one time, him carrying his ball in his mouth as per usual. He was a fair way in front and I watched him run up to a young woman lying on her towel, drop the ball at her feet and back off looking expectant. Poor woman fell for the bait, sat up and went to grab the ball. Just as she almost had it, Oscar rushed in, grabbed the ball and continued on his way with a wicked grin and a bit of a prance. And he's forever swimming out with the ball and dropping it in deep water, leaving me to be croc bait.

  7. #7
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    Yesterday at the beach a young labrador puppy came up to Maggie. Now she is very kind to puppies but not fond of bigger dogs especially labradors. So she ran around for a while but when she tried to exit it kept following her. So I threw the ball ( ball thrower) a long way and she dashed off to get it with the pup in hot pursuit. She grabbed the ball and doubled back flat out and instead of bringing the ball to me ran past me and went and hid behind a rock. She peeked out to make sure the pup was gone . Then trotted out with the ball and a giant smile on her face I swear.

  8. #8
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    My dogs have a rather sick sense of humor. And im not phobic about pretending my dogs are people. I live like this. No shame here.

    Bernie thinks its great fun to watch the other 2 dogs playing with 1 ball. As they wrestle it off each other. Once the winner has it, pohm usually, she'll sit there posing with it between her teeth, when from nowhere, comes a 100mph GSD to appears to just run past her to my eyes, yet, the ball is in his mouth at the end! And the dumb rottie is searching on the ground for the missing ball. Bernie loves this game. And seeing a long haired GSD prance around at a rotties expense IS funny.

    Brian likes to scare the bejesus out of guests with his inhale sound. He's sighing. But it makes folks move very fast, as it sounds very menacing. He then follows them prancing. He selects my MIL most, as her reaction is awesome, she screams for him. He's also been known to vocalise to scare people away, into moving away, then likes to escort them around the house. Growling/snoring to make them move. the more reaction, the more prancing around like a loon.
    He's a bordeaux, who have a bit of a rep for being clowns. He does love to make people laugh, and will throw some pretty weird behaviours to cue you in. Usually successfully.

    And they all have a tendency to jump me when im vulnerable. So back turned, bent over and BANG, as 50kg of some furry little shit has knocked me to the ground. All 3 do this. Taught originally by Kevin, the rottie i had before pohm, and handed down, from generation to generation. I Like this, as its like his legacy for having a laugh at my expense lives on past him.

    And laughing is very rewarding. IF i laugh at something the dogs do, they will repeat it.

  9. #9

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    I know I am bias but my Labrador is the funniest dog I have ever had, and so many people agree.
    she has a big belly and she leans up against the wall, and slouches as if she is sitting up and her big fat belly hangs out I have a photo, ill have to post.
    my staffy x rescue is funny too, he likes to sit on my lab like a seat, he does it all the time!
    most of the things they do are naughty and I shouldn't laugh but my two pooches make a great team, my staffy x likes to dig, and my lab is too big to fit under, so she mans the door, she will sit at our back door whilst Charlie is digging and if someone comes to the door she will start barking loudly as if to say to Charlie quick stop someones coming! then he bolts to the door.

    I bought our lab a slow feeder bowl, as she eats like a big fat pig! the slow feeder is quite heavy and has a 'non slip' material on the bottom, however Pep picks up the bowl and runs around the yard with it to get all the biccies out.

    My dogs bring me the most joy and happiness, if I have a crappy day at work just sitting outside with my 2 instantly makes me better.

  10. #10
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    I used to laugh at people who treat their dogs as humans. Little did I know! I have no doubt that our dogs have a sense of humor. Nero loves getting Rox into trouble by pretending he saw something to chase when we're out for a walk in the forest. He stares in one direction and then makes a few quick steps and when Roxy gets all excited and runs past him whining in excitment chasing an invisible roo, he turns around, scoops up a treat for coming when called and I swear he smiles!

    I guess most animals are far more like us than we're comfortable to admit, but this especially applies to dogs who have been living with us for such a long time and adapted to us so well.

    Nero hates being laughed at. If he does something funny and we laugh at him (like he wiped out the other day when chasing the ball), he comes running back and jumps up on us rather violently. He doesn't only jump but pushes with his full body weight - it's definitely a 'STOP IT' jump

    And I agree with Bernie. Nero loves to wait until I'm balancing on one leg to put on the other shoe to jump at me, sending me headfirst into the wardrobe. It's great fun and OH laughing his head off is only more encouragement.
    Last edited by margoo; 09-05-2014 at 03:14 PM.

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