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Thread: Street Fight - Where Do We Stand?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Aust.
    Posts
    148

    Default Street Fight - Where Do We Stand?

    Good Evening Pooch Lovers,

    Not sure if I'm just offloading here? If so, sorry. But had a pretty ordinary incident happen in the street on Sundee arve with a rather nasty dog fight happening.

    A family left their side gate unlatched and both their dogs were able to 'escape' the yard of course - one of them sighted the good ole' 13 year old Labrador who moves at about half a meter per hour and just launched at her. It was quite distressing of course and the poor old Lab suffered some nasty puncture wounds on her neck. Her owner went in with the hands (ouch) and got a nice bite as well. I guess that's all putting it mildly .. in the meantime there was screaming and people running around calling the police and families sheltering their kids. Quite a scene.

    I'm reasonably proud of myself for not panicking and not losing the plot as it seemed like most people were. I was very strong and confident with the dog, not mean, didn't kick it, didn't scream, didn't call the police etc etc. The dog released to me (after the hose came out by one and pulling by another) and I was able to hold it by the collar and walk it to its house and put it back in the yard and lock the gate. I had always learned that to be frightened in a situation like this could backfire and perhaps have me set upon. Anyways i'm not saying i'm a legend, just more saying that I think the way you deal with a dog in such a situation really changes the dramatics of how things can end ..

    I took the Lab down to the Vet (who was nice to come in on a Sunday) and she got stitched up and looked after. And yes, I took the girl to the docs too for her hand.

    There's a couple of things that came out of this that have left me really perplexed. There was a very common feel in the street that this dog 'must be put down'. I actually at one stage kinda asked people to maybe wait for the adrenalin wore off before trying to decide the dog's fate in a street forum! Waiting didn't change their opinions and many others at work said 'once they have the taste for blood they have to go'. I was really quite sickened and felt horrible about this. This is a dog and that is our first reaction? It really disappointed me.

    In short - the dog is being relocated to some property outside of town. The most important aspect of this situation though is:

    The dog NEVER socialised with other dogs; The dog NEVER went for walks (the other one goes occasionally and he stayed locked up); The dog NEVER knew a life outside the bounds of that fence. He got out once before, ran to Lola and Zep and there was not a problem (although his owner ran across the road hysterically and pulled at his collar stopping him - I told her it was cool and it was ok that they met! - nope!)

    Anyways, kinda made me feel like dogs suffer the punishment for poor upbringing, training and social development which should be the responsibility of the owners .. yet they themselves continue with their own stubborn and ill-educated methods of pooch raising. Made me feel a bit sad .. and somewhat p*ssed off really.

    Anyways, yeah I think I just vented there. So no need to write back if you don't want, just wanted to get it off my chest I guess.

    Respectfully just us, me, lola n zep.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    197

    Default

    I dont know much about dogs but rehomeing sounds good and perhas putting down the owner

  3. #3

    Default

    aww Zac vent all you want, we dont mind listen to your rants :.., sorry to hear you sunday arvo wasn't all that pleasant, hope all is well with the lab & its owner

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wodonga
    Posts
    2,672

    Default

    You did well - however Dog needs to be pts - it is a danger to other animals and potentially children (kid walking a dog - dog attacks - kid intervenes - kid is easy pickins).

    Yes it is the owners fault. Yes the owner needs to never own another animal. However, this dog is a product of its breeding and environment and is not fit to be in society. Failing that the dog should be declared dangerous and kept behind a 6ft secure fence at all times - outside wearing a muzzle and on lead.

    I've posted here before about the neighbour who was walking her mini foxie and her granddaughter - neighbours dog got out the front door and tore her dog apart. It was the child wasn't hurt - though she did have to watch a dog tear another one apart.

    The dog has been declared dangerous - the dog you described would have killed a small dog from what you describe.

    Dangerous dogs do not have a place in our society - and we must differentiate that from reactive dogs because they are two different things.

    This is a good read
    aggression basics

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    I am not so sure I would be advocating putting the dog to sleep. I think we come to that conclusion far to easily in this day and age.

    Dogs are natural predators. Dogs are territorial. Dogs have a hierarchy system with top dog and those beneath it. It is natural, in my view, and normal for dogs to be aggressive to each other.

    In having said that, I DO NOT IN ANY WAY CONDONE DOG AGGRESSION and I can well understand that in this instance, the poor Lab sounds like it was not threatening in any way. But then, look at the dog that attacked.... as stated, not socilaised, not walked...confined to a life of lonlieness and misery (well perhaps it is better to euth...). There is no evidence in what has been said here that the dog can not be rehabilitated though.

    I have had rescue Pugs come through that have never been socialised. As most will know, Pugs really aren't prone to aggression anyway but I can tell you, these Pugs can be about as aggressive as a Pug can be because of their social isolation. They have no idea how to interatc and play with the other Pugs, they take all games seriously and want to attack rather than play, they don't understand the act of sharing and there are a myriad of learning curves for them to follow.

    They LEARN though. They learn to interact. They learn to share. They even learn to play. There will always be an obvious difference between those who have been brought up in a social environment of both humans and dogs though and I can spot it a mile away, but they grow and develop and learn what life is about in a pack of both dogs and humans.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #6

    Default

    Wow! Hero of the street hey? Well done! Very brave, and so kind of you to take the dog to the vet and the girl to the docs. I wish I had a neighbour like you. Most of mine are I'm also glad that you didn't sustain any bites.
    I have mixed feelings really...I agree with Occy. There's no room for aggressive dogs in the society, but then I also agree with Anne. Should a dog die because the owner didn't socialise it? And like in this case no dog got killed, no horrific injuries to dogs or people. Maybe in cases like this the dog deserves a 2nd chance, educate the owner instead, encourage to socialise and train the dog. I don't know. It's sad...
    I am curious to know what the owner had to say about all this...
    I hope you weren't too shaken up once the adrenaline wore off.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern suburbs of Cairns FNQ
    Posts
    513

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    I can understand where you are coming from Anne but I'm afraid I agree with Occy.

    I know it's not the dog's fault but the owners who created the problem obviously don't care so will do nothing to control and correct the dogs behavior in the future. Rehoming the dog is probably not a good idea if the current owners choose the new home. Dog goes to new home on a property. Dog is either chained or left to roam. Dog gets loose, chases stock, farmer reaches for the shot gun. End of dog.

    There are so many beautiful dogs dying in pounds and shelters for the simple crime of being unwanted. Most have lovely temperaments. Much better to rehome one of them rather than a dog who will need experienced handling and may never be trustworthy.

    It's sad and it shouldn't happen but if it was my dog or child who was attacked without provocation I would be insisting on the removal of the offending dog from society.

  8. #8

    Default

    I don't know how i feel, It's sad to say put the dog to sleep it's not his fault, But it would be even worse if it was a child it attacked.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

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    My point was that we usually advocate death rather than determining if the dog can be successfully rehabilitated.

    There will be a great number that fail rehab but a dog who has never been socialised may very well have the capacity to learn and grow. Until the dog is assessed, no-one knows and yet we straight away cry 'euthanasia'.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #10

    Default

    My thoughts exactly.

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