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Thread: Serena has become cranky with certain dogs

  1. #11

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    A simple search came up with all of this about dog parks:

    https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sour...evid=690254576

    Yep – I am not a fan of dog parks – at all !

    How much training have you actually done with Serena ?

    Maybe it is time to remind her - via training - that you make the decisions and not her.

    Have a look at these links for ways to help you:

    Steve Courtney Dog Training Free Dog Training Advice Online - Steve Courtney Dog Training -

    kikopup - YouTube

    Have a good look around Kikopup’s site - She has videos covering just about any question you may have about pups.

    So look up things like: behavioural interrupters; Triangle of Temptation (TOT) and Nothing in Life is Free (NILIF), teaching calm; leave it; let’s go.

    The old saying – ‘familiarity breeds contempt’ – is probably really apt here with Serena and this particular dog park. It is her regular haunt and she is behaving like she owns the place – which happens with all pups.

    Mix your exercise routines up a bit. Are there any other places you can take the pups ? Because another old saying is - 'variety is the spice of life' !

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    A simple search came up with all of this about dog parks:

    https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sour...evid=690254576

    Yep – I am not a fan of dog parks – at all !

    How much training have you actually done with Serena ?

    Maybe it is time to remind her - via training - that you make the decisions and not her.

    Have a look at these links for ways to help you:

    Steve Courtney Dog Training Free Dog Training Advice Online - Steve Courtney Dog Training -

    kikopup - YouTube

    Have a good look around Kikopup’s site - She has videos covering just about any question you may have about pups.

    So look up things like: behavioural interrupters; Triangle of Temptation (TOT) and Nothing in Life is Free (NILIF), teaching calm; leave it; let’s go.

    The old saying – ‘familiarity breeds contempt’ – is probably really apt here with Serena and this particular dog park. It is her regular haunt and she is behaving like she owns the place – which happens with all pups.

    Mix your exercise routines up a bit. Are there any other places you can take the pups ? Because another old saying is - 'variety is the spice of life' !
    Hi RJ - as usual some great advice. I haven't done any formal training with Serena, just recall and leash work although she has been a very good loose lead dog from day 1. I thought our recall was rock solid but I am unable to call her off the other dog once she decides to attack. I do sometimes go to another dog park which has much less dogs but she still managed to cause trouble there as well. I'll check out those links and see how they might help.

    thanks again

    Adrian

  3. #13
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    That's why you have to try stay one step ahead of her. Easier said than done, I know. It's why it helped me to get some idea of why my dog reacted to others. It made it easier to then interpret her body language and prevent that behaviour by calling her before it escalated.

    But it sounds like Serena just runs up and doesn't even pause before she starts the fight? It might require some exercises on lead to get her out of that urge to rush at them like that. Maybe some LAT around the type of dogs that she reacts to? I'm thinking out loud now... I find this type of dog to dog stuff quite complex. Hopefully someone else can come up with some practical suggestions.

  4. #14
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    This is the trainer I see recommended in the Perth area.

    Kathy Kopellis McLeod
    Kathy's Dog Training | Kathy Kopellis McLeod | Dog Behaviour Consultant | Dog Behaviour Problems | Dog Whisperer Perth | Dog Behaviour | Dog Trainers Perth

    I've heard her talking on the radio and she makes a lot of sense.

    Serena has probably had some bad experience with a dog of this type - while off lead. And maybe she feels she has to deal with it herself if she's off lead but she can defer to you if she's on lead.

    I had to explain to Frosty again tonight that it's not ok to lunge aggressively at the poodle x thing at the park tonight. She was on lead again. It got even more complicated because that dog was with a jogger who didn't see it do a crap... so I went and picked up the crap (it was where people walk), and I had to get someone else to hand it to him and explain about watching his dog because my dog was being so rude.

    his dog started it tho - got in our faces a few months back... and was generally rude and failed to pay any attention to "rack off" signals.

    I know Frosty is going to get mad tho - because she starts with the fixed stare - like she locks on to target - then her hackles go up... and if I don't get her doing something else - ideally as soon as she "locks on" - turn her so she unlocks and get her doing something else... if I leave her to do her own thing - then she goes ballistic.

    I think it's an escalation of frustration - but even when she's off lead - she's pretty mean to these dogs. They have hurt her - so now she gets in first.

    Personally I don't think it's worth the risk that she might seriously hurt one of these dogs. Cattle dogs have quite the reputation that poodle crosses do not... And with dogs, there is no "innocent until proven guilty".

    So tonight, on the third lap of poodle dog... I got evil hound well out the way and started feeding her as fast as I could before she noticed the poodle thing - and then she noticed it and I waited for her choice (have a go or keep eating), she opted for keep eating - woot. What a good dog. So she might learn yet that I don't want that. Or I don't want her help when it comes to yelling at people who don't pick up after their dogs.

  5. #15
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    Ados you could try a dog club in Perth. There are a few and they run training classes for dogs at a reasonably low annual membership cost. Might help with some tips.

    Hyacinth , one thing I have never done is ignored dog reactive behaviour. I fortunately have only had one dog with real issues and she responded well to food both as reward and as a desensitisation aid, but I had to make sure the timing was right, criteria were consistent, she wasnt over threshold and repetition was high. Hard work and required a lot of mental assessment of what was going on to get the above right.

    My current Border Collie is pretty good but if another male dog shows signs of aggression first and stares or lunges at him it arcs him up. He is super high drive and when he was younger he was very motion sensitive to other dogs especially at agility trials. I dealt with him with a range of refocussing exercises with toys, food and recall exercises, but I also corrected him with voice and mild leash pop if I had to. It didnt take long before he got the idea. I absolutely dont allow him to practice this behaviour ever.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-03-2014 at 02:02 AM.

  6. #16
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    Mine don't like small fluffy dogs either...as these little bastards are most aggressive and want to fight mine...big mistake. Seems to me these little dogs have death wish...especially when the other dog is 10 times it's size and the owners think it's funny.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  7. #17
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    Hyacinth , one thing I have never done is ignored dog reactive behaviour.
    I have found Frosty's reactivity really hard to predict and in some cases - difficult to set up training / similar situations.

    one time I was sitting on the ground for a presentation at a dog competition, and she was with me and there was a bit of a gap - maybe 5 metres? and some more people and dogs sitting behind that... they weren't there when we sat down.

    Anyway Frosty was focussed on something at the back of the park - behind everybody. Possums maybe? There were some trees there. Never did find out what it was.

    And then a bloke in wheel chair comes along the gap, he's working pretty hard to wheel cos it's grass... And there's only about 1.5 metres from behind me.... ie very close.

    So Frosty has a go at him. Fortunately I've got her by the collar because of the other distraction... so she doesn't quite get close enough but she did pull me over in the process... I did not let go.

    But how the hell do I set that up? I introduced her to a guy that comes to our club in a wheel chair and another lady who comes to the park and she was fine... but I guess it's not the same when I'm standing up and it's day time.

    She's also quite random about bicycles and joggers. 1000 are fine to zoom by, and 1001 (pick random interval) she has a go...

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I have found Frosty's reactivity really hard to predict and in some cases - difficult to set up training / similar situations.

    one time I was sitting on the ground for a presentation at a dog competition, and she was with me and there was a bit of a gap - maybe 5 metres? and some more people and dogs sitting behind that... they weren't there when we sat down.

    Anyway Frosty was focussed on something at the back of the park - behind everybody. Possums maybe? There were some trees there. Never did find out what it was.

    And then a bloke in wheel chair comes along the gap, he's working pretty hard to wheel cos it's grass... And there's only about 1.5 metres from behind me.... ie very close.

    So Frosty has a go at him. Fortunately I've got her by the collar because of the other distraction... so she doesn't quite get close enough but she did pull me over in the process... I did not let go.

    But how the hell do I set that up? I introduced her to a guy that comes to our club in a wheel chair and another lady who comes to the park and she was fine... but I guess it's not the same when I'm standing up and it's day time.

    She's also quite random about bicycles and joggers. 1000 are fine to zoom by, and 1001 (pick random interval) she has a go...
    Yes, my reactive dog could be that like and there are a number of dogs at agility comps like that. I noticed that their owners never bring them to presentations and if they did they sat well back where they had a good view of their surroundings.

    I found with mine that I had to be totally prepared for the unpredictable by setting myself up with clear vision and monitor her body language. That one jogger she has piece of is all you need to make life difficult.

    The fact that Frosty was focussed on something would alert me to the fact that she was already in the high alert phase. She may have even heard the wheelchair before it appeared.

    These dogs are hard work because they are already hyper tuned in to stuff that we are not as their senses are more acute. Agility trials are sensory overload at the best of times, even presentations. The only dogs that I take to presentations are the ones I know can handle it it without incedence. At one presentation at a big agricultural show they let the fireworks off which caught everyone by surprise. That was a debacle. Fortunately my lad was rock solid, glad I left the others in their crates.

    With my reactive girl I really had to work hard to teach her to focus back on me but I always tried to be one step ahead of her. The occassional surprise did occur like when 2 kids and their mother all unknown to me, appeared suddenly and uninvited in the gloom of my garage when I had just unloaded her from the car. This sent her into meltdown but I had conditioned her so thoroughly that I was able to focus her straight back on me and a disaster was averted. It is not easy with a dog that can potentially react, but you know this already. I tried never to leave anything to chance and after the garage incident, checked before unloading her in future.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-03-2014 at 03:45 PM.

  9. #19
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    I think I was a bit naughty tonight - but I'm not sure what I could have done different.

    I was at our park, evil hound was off lead but hanging with me... when this big dog we don't see very often came barrelling across the oval at full speed and proceeded to "say hi" to all the dogs (there were four medium ones inc Frosty and two little ones). And this dog is running flat out and as it comes at me - I start yelling OI OI OI so it doesn't body slam me - cos I don't need a broken knee... and Frosty decides to help. So she herds it away and body slams it a couple of times... And I let her. She didn't hurt it or herself for a change.

    Owner eventually comes across but doesn't try to stop her dog from causing trouble so I tell her all the new dog rules that are coming in for this park like wearing rego tags and dogs on lead on footpaths etc so she decides to be - way over there - phew. I've met this team before and they are extremely irresponsible but there wasn't much chance of avoiding them.

    I guess when it comes to reactive dogs, Frosty is at the milder end of the spectrum so sometimes I forget I need to look after her.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I guess when it comes to reactive dogs, Frosty is at the milder end of the spectrum so sometimes I forget I need to look after her.
    Yes I can understand that. My reactive dog was on the more extreme end, so I was completely tuned in at all times. After the years I spent dealing with her I tend to be extra tuned in with my other dogs just by habit really.

    Well I guess Frosty was protecting you from bodily harm although depending on what she is like with other dogs that sort of thing can be reinforcing. I tend not to allow that behaviour so my criteria are consistant.

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