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Thread: Why the hate on crossbreeds?

  1. #11

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    I have a mutt. He is awesome.

  2. #12
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    I don't hate cross breeds - I've probably got one - she came from the AWL as a puppy.

    I do hate people who put two different breeds of dogs together (or two mutts) without any consideration or testing of genetic problems they might be doubling up with, and then make promises about providing "the best of both breeds" when they could equally be providing the worst of both breeds.

    I've seen plenty of lab x poodles that look more like wire haired terrier mutts and behave like terriers too.

    They still shed and people who are allergic to dogs are still allergic to those.

    Most of the "designer dog breeders" are breeding for cute puppies, and quick sales. The parent dogs live in absolute misery and filth, and none of the dogs or puppies get enough social contact with people or other dogs - so when people take them home they have a grumpy dog that they can't take for walks because it spends its life terrified or trying to attack everything.

    People who buy these dogs, often have no idea how to train and they don't find out why they shouldn't be rewarding puppy mills and pet shops with their cash until they come to a site like this and ask questions about why the dog's fur is all falling out, or the dog is sick and covered in fleas or is terrified of everything, or can't walk properly at 6 months old.... Or need all their teeth out at 9 years old.

    What I'm looking for is this.
    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    At least ANKC has a code of ethics - even if they don't really enforce it, you have a check list of questions when you go shopping and the breeders are supposed to help with post sales care and the best will take their dog back if you can't look after it for any reason.

    I've yet to meet a deliberate cross breeder who meets even half the criteria of the RSPCA responsible breeder list.

    They usually only comply with the council requirements to be registered as a business. Some don't even comply with state laws about microchipping and age that puppies can be rehomed.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    The ONLY way to get a quality pup is to buy a purebred pup from a registered breeder AND do your homework on the breeder before buying.
    This is the part that doesn't make sense, because "quality" is such a .. pointless? subjective? term. If a dog, whether it be a purebred from a registered breeder, from a non registered breeder, or a cross breed, is healthy, then what makes it low "quality". What is the definition of "quality" when it comes to dogs? Their health is the only thing I can think of that would apply to everyone. Perfect appearance might matter to a few that wish to show, but majority of people never show their dogs. I've lived with many dogs through my life growing up, purebred and cross, that have just come from random breeders and they've all lived a happy, health issue free life to their expected age.

    Again I'm not agreeing with puppy farms or irresponsible breeders, just why crossbreeds are apparently "low quality" when there isn't any apparent definition for this term when it comes to dogs other than "my dog is better than yours".
    Last edited by Thingz; 07-30-2014 at 08:23 AM.

  4. #14
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    A lot of purebreds come from puppy farms too. I think it's pointless to bash crossbreeds vs purebreeds when the problem is somewhere else: irresponsible breeding and irresponsible buying. People with mutts do it and people with purebreeds do it.

  5. #15
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    If people want to buy the absolutely "perfect" dog so they can show it, possibly breed it, or just feel they need to pay a huge amount for their pup for the peace of mind, that's fine and their decision, but bashing other people because they don't agree with their definition of a "perfect" or "quality" dog, not cool

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I have heard/read people talk about mixed breeds as if they're vermin. Just the tone in which they use words like mutt or mongrel... "Subcanines". I think that might come from the same dark place where racism and sexism originate... And because they don't know MY dog. Lol!
    I am quite happy with the word mutt for a xbred dog as that is what they are. My dogs are proudly mutts.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #17
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    I have a couple of views on this.

    Both of my Staffords are from registered breeders. my girly Staff was an ex-breeding dog from a registered breeder. Because of this, she has certain socialization problems stemming from living amongst other dogs in kennels rather than humans in the house.

    In retrospect would I have gone down that road - probably not - because I didn't research the breeder properly and had I done so, I would have searched for an adult Staff elsewhere. So researching the breeder is so very important and as I have found out, doesn't guarantee a family friendly, easily socialised companion.

    Having said that, all the hard work I have put in to training Serena and getting her comfortable around my kids has paid off and she has become a much loved family member. Nothing like a good cuddle with a Stafford resting its head on your leg while she sleeps and you watch television on a winter's night (wife is a little jealous).

    Bruno, on the other hand, is my 11 month old Staff from a smaller breeder that was more family oriented and because of this, Bruno has settled into the family life very well. Now I have two staffords sleeping with us on the couch. Which brings me immense pleasure and comfort on those occasional crappy days we all have.

    My second view point is this: I spent years living in an Aboriginal community in a remote desert area in the northern goldfields here in WA. In this particular community, they used 'roo dogs' specifically trained to bring down and kill kangaroos for food. Rifles and ammo were expensive out there so the roo dogs were indispensable for hunting.

    I think they were a cross between a grey hound and maybe bull mastiff as they had larger heads than your usual grey hound. To watch these dogs do their thing was amazing.

    Anyway, dogs got injured and very rarely, killed, by some of the larger big reds they latched onto. Breeding of new dogs was always done to get new stock. these dogs were treated very kindly and when they weren't hunting they lazed about on peoples porches or in a lot of cases, curled up next to me in my swag warmed by a winter fire. Fantastic memories.

    Any surplus pups were given to people coming through from other Aboriginal communities. So, in this case, cross breeding was necessary as they relied on the dogs for providing` fresh meat as the nearest town was about 200km away. Plus hunting was an important tradition that brought people together. Wether this practise was ethical or not, in my view, not relevant as the practical and cultural benefits made it a necessity out there.



    cheers

    Adrian

  8. #18
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    Great post above ^^^^^

    I dont hate X breeds .... but i do hate 'dog snobs' and repeat backyard breeders/ puppy mills.

    My wife has dog snob friends who show dogs and i love $h!t stirring them. I tell them i'm going to dress up in my best flannelette shirt and ugg boots and prance Bronx my Mastiff X around the show ring. Then hold his chin and tail up in that stupid pose they do before we prance off on our tiipy toes again. LOL. They dont see the funny side of it. They think i'm a mugg but i'm not the one who owns dogs for a short time and then rehome them because they didnt win them enough trophies or ribbons.

    They think he's a mutt cause he's not 'pure' and i agree he's a mutt.... but he's a mutt who is freaking awesome and he's loved a hundred times more than their purebreed show dogs.

    Just for the record for those that read this and dont know ....i have a mutt and a purebreed dog.


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  9. #19
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    If a dog, whether it be a purebred from a registered breeder, from a non registered breeder, or a cross breed, is healthy, then what makes it low "quality".
    Ah yes, but how do you know it's healthy. How do you know if it's free from nasty genetic diseases like PRA (progressive blindness), TNS (trapped something syndrome - that will kill a puppy inside a few months), PARVO - plenty of BYB have sold puppies with parvo and the buyer doesn't know when they look at the puppy..., joint diseases like hip dysplasia - a good score from both parents doesn't guarantee avoiding hip dysplasia but it's a good idea to avoid parents with bad scores....

    So "healthy" is not something that a buyer can see. It's something the breeder has to do before they choose which two dogs they put together. It's also about the living conditions of the breeding dogs... etc etc.

    So it's theoretically possible for a breeder to be putting together two genetically compatible dogs, and keeping them in the best conditions and making sure all the dogs and puppies get lots of human contact, not breeding too often (not more than every 18 months for the bitch), vaccinating, microchipping and waiting till puppy is 8 weeks + before rehoming, educating the buyers, checking the home of the puppy is ok, and helping them with post sales problems...

    I just don't know any "designer dog" breeders who do this. They're not in it for the best dog ever. They're in it for cute puppies and cash.

    I saw a long backed long necked squash faced wire haired small white fluffy the other day at the park. It would have been the most angelic cute puppy - but it sure was an ugly dog. And a bit casual about obeying its owner too. I predict it will have spine problems, joint problems and teeth problems as it gets older if it doesn't already.

    There are some "commercial" poodle cross breeders out there - who proudly boast over 300 breeding bitches - who all live in little separate tin sheds spread out over a farm paddock or three. It's probably clean but I don't want a dog from there, it wouldn't know how to live in a house or interact with humans especially children. There's a good chance it wouldn't know how to interact with other dogs politely (judging by the ones I meet at the park - I have to put Frosty on lead every time I see one because I know she doesn't tolerate rude dogs).

    And these commercial dd breeders - are now putting cross breed to cross breed - so you're not even getting the F1 "hybrid vigour" they promise by putting two different breeds together. Tho all that is genetic fibbing anyway. As is promising you get the best of both breeds... They can't even promise you will get a small dog when they put a small dog with a big dog to get their cross... sometimes the small dog throws back to it's huge ancestors and you get a cross that's bigger than either of the two parent breeds biggest examples.

    For people who routinely lie about stuff like that - I don't want to do business with them and I'd recommend avoiding them as much as possible.

  10. #20
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    ^ Agreed, though purebreds aren't going to be free from any of these issues too. It all comes down to the breeder - if they do it right, then no problems.

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