Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 37

Thread: Is there anything you were wrong about that you've realised as your dog got older?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,602

    Default

    American staffy that was running around and having a great time playing. I was standing up against the bench/seat and he wasn't watching where he was going and slammed right into my leg at full force.
    My dog has played zoomies with a large lab. I wasn't too worried about my dog - she's very good these days at not crashing into things but she will use obstacles (people and dogs and furniture) to dodge around to get the advantage on the other dog. And the other dog - not being as agile - will crash into the obstacles.

    This big lab - wiped out his own owner - bowled her legs straight out from under her and she fell on top of him so they were both hurt and took a while to get up. I was mortified. And now I won't let Frosty keep playing if she uses people for slalom obstacles. And I won't let her keep playing if she skittles other dogs either - no matter how much the other dog might want to.

    The chance of injuring dogs and people is just too high.

    Dogs get their joints dislocated and tendons broken and so do people. I know people who have been crash tackled by dogs - getting their knees and legs and wrists broken because of it and it's really hard to get the person responsible (owner of dog doing the crash tackle) to pay for the damage they cause.

    First you have to identify them and then you have to prove it was their dog and the damage was caused by their dog... and they just nick off and leave you with the medical and vet bills to pay.

    Strangely this kind of injury is not considered as severe as bites but joint injuries can be far more debilitating.

    So KM - you really have to watch out for zooming dogs, they will crash tackle.

    If you had jumped out the way - that Amstaff would have broken its shoulder on the bench and you wouldn't be having to deal with the owner trying to blame you for your injury.

    I do find yelling and making noise as dogs approach - often causes them to pay more attention to where they are going. But doesn't guarantee they won't crash into you. Never take your eyes off zooming dogs. Or the ones lying in ambush.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    "I do find yelling and making noise as dogs approach - often causes them to pay more attention to where they are going. But doesn't guarantee they won't crash into you. Never take your eyes off zooming dogs. Or the ones lying in ambush."

    I do that instinctively. I have very fragile bones so am really worried about being crashed into. I try to stand near a tree if possible because dogs don't usually willingly crash into big tree trunks. The other day I went for a walk with a friend and her now adolescent Great Dane. She has very little control over him and he behaves like a puppy. I was terrified during the whole walk about him crash tackling me. Every time he came running in my direction, I'd hide behind my friend if there wasn't a tree nearby, hoping that she would at least soften the impact. I think it is an owner's responsibility to make sure that dogs don't crash into people. But of course, at the dog park you can just stand with your back against the fence.

    I used to walk my friend's lab and my dog together for 6 months and zoomies were often a real threat to my safety. So I'd pick up a stick and wave it around me if they approached. Point down. I never intended to impale them.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    I would never ever expect anyone to pay if their dog injured me or my dog by accident. I definitely didn't expect the American staffy's owner to pay anything at all, the point I was getting at is that a 'sorry' would've gone a long way. Thankfully the poor pooch did hit me and not the bench because the bench would've done a lot more damage.
    I was standing there talking to the staffy owner and JRT owner. Another dog was coming in the gate so I looked away for a minute to call my dogs away and that's when I was hit. There was a huge thump, I didn't make any deal of it sorta half laughed and just said "holy hell that hurt!" And sat down on the bench. JRT's owner was looking away when it happened and turned around and said "are you ok? What happened!?" And without missing a beat, staffy's owner said "your dog ran into her leg". As I said, I would never expect any owner to pay for anything, it's really not that bad, just a few days without exercise and I'll be fine, but the polite thing would've been for the staffy owner to simply say sorry... Instead they just looked in the other direction, didn't make eye contact and didn't say another word while JRT's owner fussed over me, even though I kept telling her I was fine.

    I didn't want a fuss made and I didn't want a heart-felt apology, I just wanted them to say sorry. My dogs have a habit of wresting between people's legs, I always call them away and say sorry to the person. It's just basic manners.
    Last edited by Kristy.Maree; 06-24-2014 at 01:09 PM.

  4. #14

    Default

    I remember back when Sammy was but a wee pup and we did visit dog parks often, when I went to get my legs waxed the lady almost had a heart attack. My legs were covered in bruises

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,639

    Default

    I think personally that even on an off lead park you need to be aware. The park my mother uses is used by a lot of elderley people who live in the area and is the only place to exercise their dogs. Most people are very good at allowing their dogs to have fun but at the same time being aware of the main age group that uses the park and sorting it so that people are safe. This isnt always the case and I will never forget a young woman allowing her out of control young staffy to terrorise a number of older folk with no concern at all. An old lady was knocked flying when this staffy jumped all over her old dog and she was permanently crippled with thousands of dollars worth of medical bills. She was taken off in an ambulance and has ongoing medical problems and is unable to ever walk her dog again. The young woman was not in the least sorry and was seen some time later allowing her dog to zoom around without care. A number of people using the area had to have a serious word with her and she moved on. She had no intention of controlling her dog and seemed to think it was her dogs right to do what it pleased.

    In fact the law states that you should be in control of your dog at all times. We will all get old and frail one day and people need to respect that these older folk are still part of our society. I have om occassion had to step infront of my elderley mother to take the impact from a large dog lunging "playfully" at her old dog with my mother nearly becoming collateral damage.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,602

    Default

    Isn't that just the risk you take when going to an off leash dog park?
    I don't think so. Not in South Australia anyway. Dogs are supposed to be under effective control so if they slam into your or your dog - they're not under effective control or the owner did it deliberately - either way the owner has broken the law and they are liable (in my opinion) for your injury. Same as if their toddler or koolie let the hand brake off the car and it ran you over.

    Oooh it was an accident - doesn't really cut it if you ask me.

    People need to be responsible for their dog's actions including the zoomies.

    Frail people and dogs should be able to get some off lead exercise too. Or even on lead - eg our beaches are off lead in winter but it should still be ok for people who are scared of dogs, or frail people and their dogs to be able to come to the beach as well.

    And it's even more important that dogs be under control in a fully fenced dog park. Because they can be crowded and there isn't room for people or dogs to run flat out without looking where they are going. It's like saying it's ok for some people to play football in a shopping mall and expect other shoppers to be ok with being "accidentally" body slammed by a football player. I don't think so.

    I know a lot of dog park users do think anything goes and tough luck if my big dog crushes you or your dog. But I'm pretty sure - legally - they're not right.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    And it's even more important that dogs be under control in a fully fenced dog park. Because they can be crowded and there isn't room for people or dogs to run flat out without looking where they are going. It's like saying it's ok for some people to play football in a shopping mall and expect other shoppers to be ok with being "accidentally" body slammed by a football player. I don't think so.
    I guess the difference is that if you're frail and/or elderly and chose an off leash dog park of all places for a walk with your rollator you'll be at least partly responsible for any damage yourself. Same goes for your dog. If your dog just has a triple bypass and two new hips last week an offleash dogpark where people take their dogs to do zoomies is probably not such a brilliant idea. While a shopping mall is no footy field and shoppers probably can't be blamed for being careless when going shopping... just what you do in a shopping mall.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,639

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    I guess the difference is that if you're frail and/or elderly and chose an off leash dog park of all places for a walk with your rollator you'll be at least partly responsible for any damage yourself. Same goes for your dog. If your dog just has a triple bypass and two new hips last week an offleash dogpark where people take their dogs to do zoomies is probably not such a brilliant idea. While a shopping mall is no footy field and shoppers probably can't be blamed for being careless when going shopping... just what you do in a shopping mall.
    A public open space is for everybody to enjoy. Offleash exercise areas over here are not designated dog parks, they are ovals where your dog is allowed off leash. These are areas where kiddies play, people play sport and the elderley have as much right as anyone to walk their dogs without fear. Same as the off leash beach area. The off leash bit is a priveledge which the councils are very quick to take away if it is abused by a few.

    As to purpose built designated dog parks I would still be watchfull and make sure my dogs are not out of control and in damage mode. That is simply not what I expect my dogs to be like. Certainly not knocking over small dogs and people in the name of running wild and having fun. Causing damage to other dogs and people is not my idea of a good day out with my dogs.

    I guess they could put signs up and say only young, fit and agile people can enter this area in safety. People with any disabilities will just have to suck it up and go exercise your dogs on lead somewhere else.

    This is what I have learnt as I have become older, that if you have disabilities or are elderley you seem to become invisible. I have become much more aware of this with several friends that have been disabled in accidents and with elderley parents.

    I might add though that plenty of fit elderley people like a good brisk exercise with their dogs. As fit as they are they are still a lot more vulnerable to injury if bowled by a dog. I know an eighty year old who jogs with her dog and all though she is fitter than many younger people she is still eighty.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-25-2014 at 01:03 AM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Kalacreek it's certainly a difference if we're talking an offleash area or a fenced dog park with signs up etc. I didn't make this distinction but was thinking of designated dog parks in my post.

    And I get your point about getting invisible with a disability. I'm not advocating letting dogs run into strangers at full speed a they please. Of course owners should make sure their dog don't bully others or harasses other people. But I think dogs - even the good trained once - aren't little machines that always behave perfectly and there needs to be a concession to that at some point. And where and when - if not in a designated dog area? I'm just a believer that sometimes an accident is really only an accident and the blame game of compensation claims have ruined many perfectly fine activities.

    The limitations and restrictions where you can take your dog are pretty ridiculous anyway. So I guess what I'm advocating is just a little common sense on both sides. If you feel frail and enter a dog park you may want to keep an eye out for dogs doing zoomies. If you know your dog is prone to being bullied you keep an eye out for the boisterious labs everyone seems to hate. And if you know your dog plays so rough that other dogs find it intimidating then you put your dog on the lead if it doesn't leave the others alone. Could be so easy. Yet reading your posts I realise it's incredibly hard... I'm just really glad I don't have to go to dog parks.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,639

    Default

    Yes I agree about the compensation thing. However I think sometimes people see an offleash sign and think thay can just let their dog do as it pleases. Most people especially if they frequent a dog exercise area often are pretty good as they get to know each other and the dogs. I have just seen the results of the odd one that didnt care. I remember one man who just sat in his car and let his large doberman run amok scattering everything in its path and pooing at will which he never saw. No dogs are not machines but they do need to be under a watchful eye and be easily reigned in if the situation looks like going pear shaped.

    Yes accidents do happen but you do know if your dog is the type likely to cause one and that is when as the owner you need to take responsibility to minimise this. I have seen older people shouting in fear as a large dog zoomed around them with said younger owner laughing and doing nothing, not understanding the problem. "Oh my dog is only having fun he wont hurt you". So it is just that level of awareness that is so important. Most of us will probably always have dogs that need exercise but we are not always going to be young, fit and strong. My mother out walking her dog has been known to sit on the ground when circled by a young enthusiastic large dog. The young owners often think it hilarious, simply because they dont understand why she would do that.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-25-2014 at 08:56 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •