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Thread: my 8 year old spoodle howling when i leave the house

  1. #1

    Default Help my 8 year old spoodle with severe separation anxiety

    Please help me i have tried so many ways to stop my 8 year old spoodle howling when i leave the house.
    I have tried to take him for a walk before i leave...he is still howling
    I have tried to give him kong....he is not interested with kongs instead he is still howling
    I think i have tried everything...now i lock him in the laundry room instead of leaving him outside the house since my neighbour has complained to the council.
    Please help me!

  2. #2

    Default my 8 year old spoodle howling when i leave the house

    Please help me i have tried so many ways to stop my 8 year old spoodle howling when i leave the house.
    I have tried to take him for a walk before i leave...he is still howling
    I have tried to give him kong....he is not interested with kongs instead he is still howling
    I think i have tried everything...now i lock him in the laundry room instead of leaving him outside the house since my neighbour has complained to the council.
    Please help me!

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi Rupert,

    couple of questions, has your dog always howled? Does he demonstrate any other symptoms of separation anxiety like scratching at doors etc?

    My dogs have done this as puppies, best way I know to fix it is to put the dog outside or in a room away from you - somewhere that will make them howl or display the behaviour that concerns you. Wait until they stop exhibiting this behaviour and then and only then let the dog in/out. My dog is a mostly Dobermann cross and they are Velcro dogs so in the beginning he would go crazy when he couldn't get to me. He destroyed doors, howled and as he's a big dog, he was very loud and very destructive. Through that method though, and always telling him off for barking unless it was a reason I appreciated (such as someone at the door or on the property), he stopped and now when I go out, he just relaxes because he knows nothing he does will bring me home any sooner.

    I will add something though, and I'm sure it will upset some people. Of all the breeds I've ever had anything to do with, mini poodles are the absolute worst for separation anxiety. My mum's ex boyfriend had one who would cry just from being left downstairs. The guy ignored the dog, but it didn't stop. The dog just could not relax without his owner right next to him. My old housemates also had a mini poodle, exactly the same. If they went out, we knew we weren't getting any sleep that night until they got home because the dog would just howl and jump at the door continuously - I mean for hours on end. Google this sort of problem, and there's lots of different breeds but the mini poodles are there in force. I'm guessing your spoodle has mini poodle in him and has perhaps inherited some of these traits.

    I'm often a person who blames the owner rather than the dog, I believe that we create most of the problems in our dogs. But with mini poodles, they just seem to be a little manic in this respect regardless of what their owners do. That doesn't help you much though. If I were you, I would just try and work on getting the dog to be comfortable locked outside or in different rooms with you and work your way up.

  4. #4

    Default

    Just thought of something else. Does your dog always listen to you and respect you?

    I have seen cases of separation anxiety that were a bit different. In these cases, the dogs did not see their owners as pack leaders, ie barked and charged at other dogs and people regardless of what their owners said, didn't listen to them unless it suited them etc. As a result, they did not accept their owners coming and going as they needed to and expressed a great deal of frustration when left alone. In some of these cases, by these people stepping up and claiming the top spot, the dogs accepted that the leaders need to come and go and that they have decided to leave the dog at home. Made them feel more secure and less stressed so they stopped the tantrums.

    Might not be the case for you but just another thought.

  5. #5
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    Merged the threads into general.

  6. #6
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    My dog howled when she was a puppy.

    I would shut her in a crate when I went out and she would scream her head off. I did introduce my neighbours to her and let them know to come to me if they had any problems (ie they didn't need to go to council).

    They did hear her a bit but since she didn't yell at night when I was home and sleeping all good.

    So has your dog been doing this for 8 whole years? It might be hard to fix.

    Definitely keep dog inside - much easier to train new behaviour from inside and much harder for neighbours to aggravate the problem by yelling at the dog or throwing things at it or even hosing it.

    So how I cured my dog.

    1. I was very forgetful. So I'd go out and come back cos I forgot my jacket.
    repeat for umbrella - ignore dog
    repeat for book
    repeat for bag
    repeat for bus tickets
    repeat for a snack (maybe give the dog a treat if she's quiet) etc.

    So after I forget something about 10 times - the dog got sick of yelling every time I went out.

    You can do this when you're not planning to go anywhere.

    Extremely important never let the dog out the crate (or laundry) when it's yelling. Wait for it to take a breath first. Then build up duration of quietness to get out.

    Eg if open door when it was quiet, and dog starts yelling - shut door and count to ten - if quiet - repeat attempt to get dog out..

    Unfortunately for my dog - I didn't know about crate training and crate games - when I first got her so she spent a bit of time in the crate yelling her head off which is not ideal.

    Ideally you train your dog to like being in the crate or laundry - pair it with food and fun games and then very gradually build up the time the dog has to be in there without you, while you're home. If the dog yells a lot - cover up the crate so they can't see out. If they're quiet, uncover part of the crate... and if the dog is used to eating in the crate - you can put chews and kongs with frozen food to keep the dog entertained while they're doing their time...

  7. #7
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    Rupert06, has your dog been exhibiting this behaviour for all 8 years of it's life or is this a new behaviour?

    If new, I'd get it checked at the vet first in case there is something medical causing anxiety/stress. If that is ruled out then I'd consider installing a dog door for your dog to have inside and outside access while you are not home. A lot of dogs just need to be inside the house, especially if they do not spend a lot of time outside when you are home. If it is new, another reason could be that something happened while you weren't home recently and that caused fear/stress in the dog, creating a stress response.

    If you don't want to install a door, you can leave the dog inside when you leave (if practical) or teach the dog to be ok outside on its own. Most dogs I have encountered that suffer some form of separation anxiety aren't given alone time when the owners ARE home, thus creating a dependence for the dog.

    Depending on the severity of the issue, enforce time on their own bed in the same room as you without the need to sit on the couch with you or on your lap. Ignore the dog when it is attention seeking - barking at you, howling, pawing/scratching your arm/leg for attention. If you give attention at these time, you are rewarding the behaviour and the dog is more likely to continue this behaviour in the future. Once you are going strong with this you can start increasing distance from you to other rooms (you walk out of the room and immediately return, gradually increasing the time if the dog is comfortable) and eventually outside.

    Good Luck. Please keep us updated

  8. #8
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    First of all, how have you een noticing this? Is this something new for 8 years that you him? If yes then it could be a warning sign for something that is happening whenever you leave. If this has been going for a long time already then you have to figure out some strategy to stop it. Hyacint's idea is something that I would try. It's all about psyching your pet I guess. have heard the same strategy from some firends and has worked well. You just have to do it regularly on a good timing. Goodluk!

  9. #9

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    Hi there, My dog is getting better now. I have trained him using the crate method, but instead of using crate, i put him in the laundry. It wasnt pleasant in the first week but he is much2 better now. He does still cry a little bit (not howling), not sure how to totally train him not to cry though? but now he doesnt howl, and only cry for 5-10 mins.

  10. #10
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    I guess you repeat the "I forget routine" and increase your criteria to complete quiet. No howling and no crying.

    He might be calm enough now to take a treat that takes a little while to chew up, and that might give him something else to do instead of crying for 10 minutes. My dog likes roo jerky. If your dog is ok with a bone or a cow hoof or a kong with wet kibble or bits of chicken or something frozen in it... then he might use that instead of crying.

    A radio with talk on it eg abc local or radio national - might be good. Tho you might want to get a talking podcast and put that on repeat play - then you guarantee no scary noises like thunder or banging over the radio.

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