Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Robot Dogs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    158

    Default Robot Dogs

    Hi all,

    this thread isn't about the well known K9 robot dog from early Dr Who episodes I grew up with, but rather about dog training. A little back story here:

    at my local off leash dog park there is a certified dog trainer that takes her poodle and fluffy dog along. She is a nice person and happy to dispense training advice. But I noticed one thing about her method and that is her dogs were extremely well behaved. These dogs weren't allowed to play with the other dogs and they were chastised for attempting to do so. She even told me that Serena shouldn't run with other dogs because she will learn to rough play and become unruly. Is there such a thing as too much training? I myself would be sad if Serena wasn't allowed to play and run around with other dogs. Isn't that the point of off-leash parks?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Well, in my world it's not exactly a sign of quality if a dog trainer has so little trust in their dog that they feel the need to control every little move they make...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    I hate that some owners feel they need to micro manage their pet. Poor pet.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bunbury
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I have a parent like that in my class. The child is 5 going 6 and the mother micromanages her to the point we look at her with frustration wishing she would let the poor child be!!
    She is impeccably turned out and cared for but isn't allowed an original thought. if the mother is there when this little one is reading her reading book to me she tries to interrupt and correct her... constantly. Arghhhh
    Sadly she is likely to get pay back when the child is a teenager!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    What a weird dog owner/trainer
    Poor dogs, not being allowed to play, if she doesn't let them play then they're never gonna learn how to play politely with other dogs are they?

    Quote Originally Posted by farrview View Post
    I have a parent like that in my class. The child is 5 going 6 and the mother micromanages her to the point we look at her with frustration wishing she would let the poor child be!!
    She is impeccably turned out and cared for but isn't allowed an original thought. if the mother is there when this little one is reading her reading book to me she tries to interrupt and correct her... constantly. Arghhhh
    Sadly she is likely to get pay back when the child is a teenager!!
    I watched one of my close childhood friends go through this as we grew up together. I always felt sorry for her, my parents were considered strict to a lot of my friends, but compared to this friends parents, I must have looked like some crazy child who does what she wants when she wants! She was so restricted on absolutely everything she did, it was really hard to see And it still happens even though she's nearly an adult.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ados View Post
    Hi all,

    Is there such a thing as too much training? I myself would be sad if Serena wasn't allowed to play and run around with other dogs. Isn't that the point of off-leash parks?
    Sure is! Go visit GSD Club Victoria Keillor, you'll see roughly 45 dead german shepherds, acting like zombis to barked commands from drones/members.

    I would say, the lady you speak of, works there lol

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Poor little pooch indeed. Serena lights up when she is with other dogs. Why would I deny her that? Plus, my kids are pretty free to explore their world and whilst their well being is always uppermost in our minds, we want them to have a childhood filled with adventures, dirt and all. Sure, we go through a tonne of washing, and sure, I have to occasionally wash manure out of their hair after 'Manure Wars', but all in all, its better out in the garden with me than clositered inside, especially when the weather is so nice. As Serena is part of our family now, she is afforded the same freedoms. Otherwise, whats the point of life?

    Still, if you want to see a supremely well behaved poodle that can do all the tricks except run free with other dogs, then come down to my dogpark and have a look.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    There is a balance between quality of life for the human and the dog and the perfectly behaved.

    I struggle with it. My dog training guru sometimes struggles with it. Her dogs are not perfect but they never ever get scolded or chastised when they stuff up and they all LIVE for her to give them something to do. Their most fun game is figuring out what that is (learning something new) and they all try to get her to give them something to do - which results in some amazing tricks. One of her dogs will fetch a soft toy, sit up in the beg position with the toy in his arms and rock it like a baby. Which is way too cute to ignore so he's training her...

    Many people I know who do competitive dog sports do not allow their dogs to play with dogs they don't know because the risk of injury or attack is too great. A body slam between a Border Collie and a Lab is not going to end well for the BC. And an agile dog making a tight turn in a game of zoomies is going to wipe out the ordinary hound chasing her. And the possibility of destroying an ACL or patella can be high and horrible if it happens.

    I let my dog play with some dogs and not others, and I watch to make sure both dogs are happy and that there is low risk of painful collisions - including the owners. An obedient dog is one which will come away from play when you call. The only way you know if you have this is if you test it, by calling when the dog is playing... If all is good you can reward by releasing back to play.

    The main thing is the dog does what you want when you ask which means some training on your part, and not allowing them to ignore a request from you - which doesn't mean you have to scold or chastise. It just means you may have to wade into the water if the dog goes in without permission (if you've set that criteria) or won't come out when you ask.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    There is a balance between quality of life for the human and the dog and the perfectly behaved.

    I struggle with it. My dog training guru sometimes struggles with it. Her dogs are not perfect but they never ever get scolded or chastised when they stuff up and they all LIVE for her to give them something to do. Their most fun game is figuring out what that is (learning something new) and they all try to get her to give them something to do - which results in some amazing tricks. One of her dogs will fetch a soft toy, sit up in the beg position with the toy in his arms and rock it like a baby. Which is way too cute to ignore so he's training her...

    Many people I know who do competitive dog sports do not allow their dogs to play with dogs they don't know because the risk of injury or attack is too great. A body slam between a Border Collie and a Lab is not going to end well for the BC. And an agile dog making a tight turn in a game of zoomies is going to wipe out the ordinary hound chasing her. And the possibility of destroying an ACL or patella can be high and horrible if it happens.

    I let my dog play with some dogs and not others, and I watch to make sure both dogs are happy and that there is low risk of painful collisions - including the owners. An obedient dog is one which will come away from play when you call. The only way you know if you have this is if you test it, by calling when the dog is playing... If all is good you can reward by releasing back to play.

    The main thing is the dog does what you want when you ask which means some training on your part, and not allowing them to ignore a request from you - which doesn't mean you have to scold or chastise. It just means you may have to wade into the water if the dog goes in without permission (if you've set that criteria) or won't come out when you ask.
    What you say makes sense and maybe I should be a bit more aware of Serena's play. I fall into the realm of 'free range dad' rather than 'helicopter dad'. Not to say I don't take the safety of my kids or Serena lightly. Serena is very good at picking dogs that might play a bit rough and she generally goes in for a look-see and comes back to my call no worries at all. She will come back of her own accord if she feels a nice play has turned a bit rough and not fun anymore. Our recall is fantastic now! or almost so - for some reason, she can spot another staffy from the other end of the park. That's when our recall training has really paid off and I can usually halt her in her tracks and call her back. I don't chastise if she does ignore me. I just wait until she turns my way and with a voice full of praise, she comes running for a scratch under the chin. She refuses to take treats on her walks but praise seems to be enough reward for her!! I wish my kids were the same !

    Maybe I'm being harsh on the lady as she has much more experience than me training dogs.

    take it easy

    Adrian and Serena

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    I am happy for my dogs to play but I also keep and eye on the type of play. I certainly dont want my working dogs body slammed by a heavier dog. I generally keep an eye on what is going on. I also watch my dogs around old people and kids so they dont knock them over in play. I think dogs can have fun without being unruly. I let mine run rougher on my property although I am a bit more careful these days because I have had my old dog slammed into the ground before which really hurt her.

    I think if you have a good recall then you can pretty much manage most situations if you need to. I guess like Hyacinth says there is a balance.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •