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Thread: Just a question, has anyone ever had to give up a dog for any reason?

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    Ive rehomed 2.
    My first rehome, was the families dog, when i walked in the rain, with a double buggie and 2 children, in a hurry. I could only save us 3. I was homeless. I left the dog. Who was put in the pound by ex, despite promising to give me a few weeks to find a roof first, id then take the dog.
    My 2nd was a pound rescue staffie. The dog seemed fine at the pound. For 3 months, i gradually introduced this pound dog to mine. And her aggression levels toward our mature family pet dog, were dangerous, and caused injuries that required vets assistance. I returned her after she tore a chunk out of my dogs flank.
    I simply couldnt ask this of my dog. To accept this level of aggression in his own home. She went back to the rescue organisation i got her from, attacked a member of staff at the rescue, who was temperament testing him for rehoming. Fail.
    In both incidences. I felt a real low life. It hurt.

    In both cases, i got strength to do, because there was no other option at the time.
    At least you gave the staffie time to adjust, it wasn't your fault the dog became aggressive.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karma&Gibbs View Post
    That's horrible, she was a vet nurse, she should have known better puppy's do what puppy's do best. Poor puppy. This kind of thing makes me mad ! But as I said earlier I understand why people do it in difficult situations, and they ALWAYS (like every body on this forum) do the best to find a great home for their pets.
    It makes me so mad too! I didn't know what to say her, I was just disgusted. How could she care for animals all day long then treat her own dog as disposable? It baffles me.
    I do agree with you though that sometimes it is in the pet's best interest to rehome them. Absolutely. It must still be a really difficult decision and I don't envy anyone in that position.

    Taija - My bit of everything girl

  3. #13

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    I bet , I would be too, being a vet nurse myself I love all animals plus my own, no pet should be treated as disposable. Do you do that to children? And unless I was ill or in a bit of a pickle (putting it nicely), I could not imagine ever giving up my fur babies. I would not take on anything I couldn't handle, but while my pets may drive me crazy at times, I still love them and will look after them until their end of days. I don't have any children yet, so these are my kids.

  4. #14

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    I have. The dog had very thin nerves, was easily overwhelmed and reacted aggressively. As I live in the city, I did not see him as a suitable dog given my circumstances and what I look for from a dog. I don't think it's a case of viewing dogs as disposable, I don't at all. But like people, you won't always want to be friends with every dog you meet. And if you know the dog will be better suited to a different lifestyle (for example mine was rehomed onto a rural property where he would almost never have to deal with the stress of meeting new people etc) then sometimes I think it's best for the dog to be rehomed.

    I would do it again if I was ever in the same situation, it has worked out much better for me and the dog.

    It goes both ways, in the sporting community people buy dogs that they want to compete with. It's hard to tell when they're puppies, but if they grow up and it becomes obvious that they're not going to be able to do the sport, well that can be really hard on a dog if they're always subject to their owner's disappointment (and no matter how hard people try to hide it the dog will still know). These dogs are often rehomed into pet homes and my understanding is that it's a much more common practice overseas. For many people, you don't really have enough resources to train more than 2 dogs and so if you have a dog that can't do what you want it to do, that stops you from being able to have 1-2 dogs that you can compete with. I just don't think it's fair on the dog or the handler.

    I think so long as you make an effort to find them a new good quality home, then there's not really any reason to feel guilty or as though you failed the dog. Sammy is a perfect dog for me and I doubt he would be happier in a different home, we go together too well and we're on the same wavelength. The other dog is much happier in his new home than what he ever was with me.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    It goes both ways, in the sporting community people buy dogs that they want to compete with. It's hard to tell when they're puppies, but if they grow up and it becomes obvious that they're not going to be able to do the sport, well that can be really hard on a dog if they're always subject to their owner's disappointment (and no matter how hard people try to hide it the dog will still know). These dogs are often rehomed into pet homes and my understanding is that it's a much more common practice overseas. For many people, you don't really have enough resources to train more than 2 dogs and so if you have a dog that can't do what you want it to do, that stops you from being able to have 1-2 dogs that you can compete with. I just don't think it's fair on the dog or the handler.
    Most sport people I know in general deal with it. I have friends whose dogs have had to retire early due to injury or other problems like hip or elbow dysplasia that manifested in the new young dog (I have one of those) and they dont generally rehome them, I wouldnt rehome my dysplastic dog, she is a wonderful creature and very bonded to me. Same with a dog that has a career ending injury or condition.

    When the dogs get too old to do sport, you simply dont just dispose of them so that you can get a new dog to do sport with. I have an old dog that is taking a spot that could be filled by a younger dog but I would never part with her, she is too special. There are many reasons why a dog may turn out not to be suitable but in my experience rehoming them tends to be very rare. People usually find a way to have another dog.

    For most people sport is about having fun with their dogs it is not a deal breaker to owning a dog. Even the people who take it really seriously will usually find a way round having to rehome a dog. They also usually choose their lines very wisely.

    In fact here is a lovely story of an agility dog owned by probably one of the best agility handlers in Australia. Sparked quite a bit of conversation about the trials and tribulations of not having the perfect dog and the lessons one learns. Very few agility dogs are perfect and it takes skill to learn how to get them there rather than just passing them on.


    Epic Agility: Turning Your Challenges Into Your Strengths
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 05-14-2014 at 09:57 PM.

  6. #16
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    in the sporting community people buy dogs that they want to compete with. It's hard to tell when they're puppies, but if they grow up and it becomes obvious that they're not going to be able to do the sport
    There is a story out of North America about an Agility competitor who does this. She was in the habit of PTS a dog she couldn't be successful with. Somebody in the sport managed to persuade her to rehome the dog with a new owner who proceeded to beat the first owner in Agility competitions with the SAME DOG.

    I know someone else with a dog who has the perfect build for agility but not the temperament - just overwhelmed and freaked out all the time at competition. She retired that dog, and got another one to train for competition but the first dog enjoys the home life just fine.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    There is a story out of North America about an Agility competitor who does this. She was in the habit of PTS a dog she couldn't be successful with. Somebody in the sport managed to persuade her to rehome the dog with a new owner who proceeded to beat the first owner in Agility competitions with the SAME DOG.

    I know someone else with a dog who has the perfect build for agility but not the temperament - just overwhelmed and freaked out all the time at competition. She retired that dog, and got another one to train for competition but the first dog enjoys the home life just fine.
    The more you get to know people in the sporting community the more you realise how many are working through many varied issues with their dogs. I think it often makes you better trainers and to me my dogs are important in other ways. I have a timid rescue dog that I have perservered with in agility and he is really starting to shine and he now has fun, is quite fast, has his Masters titles and makes state finals. He is never going to be a top dog but I enjoy running him. I have a dog who has a perfect agility build, very fast and agile, but is not switched on particularly to agility, however she nails it in herding trials.

    I was surprised at how many of our handlers really will work with what they have. Often the champion agility dogs have taken a lot of hard work and savvy training to get them there. Some trainers seem to be able to get the most improbable dogs there. I have a friend who took on a human and dog aggressive reject from being PTS and he is now a wonderful agility dog. She has done marvels with him.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 05-15-2014 at 12:30 PM.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    Most sport people I know in general deal with it. I have friends whose dogs have had to retire early due to injury or other problems like hip or elbow dysplasia that manifested in the new young dog (I have one of those) and they dont generally rehome them, I wouldnt rehome my dysplastic dog, she is a wonderful creature and very bonded to me. Same with a dog that has a career ending injury or condition.

    When the dogs get too old to do sport, you simply dont just dispose of them so that you can get a new dog to do sport with. I have an old dog that is taking a spot that could be filled by a younger dog but I would never part with her, she is too special. There are many reasons why a dog may turn out not to be suitable but in my experience rehoming them tends to be very rare. People usually find a way to have another dog.

    For most people sport is about having fun with their dogs it is not a deal breaker to owning a dog. Even the people who take it really seriously will usually find a way round having to rehome a dog. They also usually choose their lines very wisely.

    In fact here is a lovely story of an agility dog owned by probably one of the best agility handlers in Australia. Sparked quite a bit of conversation about the trials and tribulations of not having the perfect dog and the lessons one learns. Very few agility dogs are perfect and it takes skill to learn how to get them there rather than just passing them on.


    Epic Agility: Turning Your Challenges Into Your Strengths
    I haven't heard of many rehoming old dogs, more young dogs that just don't show any potential. This is before even 6 months of age, when they start to show who they really are and whether they're even interested in the sport. Some dogs live for it, others are stressed by it. Some dogs you form a really strong bond with and you don't even have to try, others no matter what you do you don't feel the same way. The bond is extremely important in the sport, because you need the dog to want to please you and you need the person to want to spend all their spare time with the dog. So if no bond is forming, that can be another reason. And yeah, those dogs can do amazingly well with different handlers, I've seen that more than once.

    I don't think that responsible rehoming of young dogs should be discouraged. I mean it's one thing if you're a new owner, never had a dog before and don't know any different. But if you have been owning dogs all your life like most of the people at our club had been, and you know what you want in a dog, well I don't see anything wrong with that. So long as the effort is made to ensure the dog has a good home. Many of the breeders who sell dogs for the sport even assist, they have pet homes lined up of people who think they want a big tough dog but could never handle it and have no experience so these dogs are typically perfect for them.

  9. #19

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    What I will say is that I find it disgusting when people rehome an older dog because "it doesn't get along with the new puppy". That makes me sick. Rehoming young dogs is pretty easy, they bond well to a new owner and they're still puppyish. Getting rid of a 4+ year old dog when you are the only family that dog has ever known is pretty horrible in my books, I don't really think I could ever accept that.

    And all these women who say they need to rehome their dog because they're having a baby. Firstly I don't see why you can't have both, Sammy would make a fine baby sitter! (probably shouldn't have any kids lol) but the point is you can have both and it can be great for children. But secondly, you can't tell me you had no idea you would be having a baby within the next 10 years when you bought the dog. If you don't think dogs and children should mix at all, don't buy a dog if you want children. If you think only some breeds should be around children and you think you want children within the next 10 years why would you buy a breed you don't think should be around them?

    I don't know, those sorts of rehoming situations make me very sad.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    I haven't heard of many rehoming old dogs, more young dogs that just don't show any potential. This is before even 6 months of age, when they start to show who they really are and whether they're even interested in the sport. Some dogs live for it, others are stressed by it. Some dogs you form a really strong bond with and you don't even have to try, others no matter what you do you don't feel the same way. The bond is extremely important in the sport, because you need the dog to want to please you and you need the person to want to spend all their spare time with the dog. So if no bond is forming, that can be another reason. And yeah, those dogs can do amazingly well with different handlers, I've seen that more than once.

    I don't think that responsible rehoming of young dogs should be discouraged. I mean it's one thing if you're a new owner, never had a dog before and don't know any different. But if you have been owning dogs all your life like most of the people at our club had been, and you know what you want in a dog, well I don't see anything wrong with that. So long as the effort is made to ensure the dog has a good home. Many of the breeders who sell dogs for the sport even assist, they have pet homes lined up of people who think they want a big tough dog but could never handle it and have no experience so these dogs are typically perfect for them.
    I think it is complicated. I have had dogs that I form a very strong bond with and then for whatever reason are not going to be suitable for trialing, but I could never rehome them. My best trialing dog I have at the moment will run for anyone, I wouldnt say I have such a strong bond with him. He is work oriented and will run his heart out but I am not sure he is doing it for me LOL, he is simply high drive and geared to work. We are in tune with each other but in a different way to my heart dogs. I dont share the same bond with him that I have with my non trialing dog (elbow dysplasia diagnosed at 6 months old).

    I dont think finding a suitable home is bad, I just dont see it often. I think most people tend to treat dogs with more respect than just as potential winners. It is just as easy to become bonded with a non potential dog as a dog with potential. It will very much depend on the dogs character. My heart dog is a non potential dog LOL. She was mine the minute I bought her home as a pup. She is always near me and would protect me with her life. How could I rehome her? I cant do sport with her but that is not what makes her important to me. There are other riches to be had.

    I find sport can often make you lose connection with the other things about dogs that we enjoy. I enjoyed all my dogs before sport and sadly you can have a higher level of disatisfaction with dogs when you are geared to sport and will sometimes miss the other gold that lies within a dog.

    What do you do with a dog that tries its heart out but is not going to be as fast as the top dogs? I had one like that and she was probably the most fun I ever had because her eyes shone so brightly. She didnt know she wasnt a top speed dog because she was running her heart out as fast as her build would allow, and doing it for me. The shine in her eyes was enough for me, no rosettes could ever replace that. I would have walked on hot coals before I gave her away as not having the potential to be a top dog.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 05-15-2014 at 03:36 PM.

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