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Thread: Dog Agility + Aggression.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    Default Dog Agility + Aggression.

    A lady brought her beautiful 3 year old brown and white BC Oden, in today for a check up.
    We had to put her outside as she was barking and snarling too much at any dog that was brought past her.
    When it was time for her home time, I asked the owner about the aggressiveness and she replied telling that Oden had been rescued from someone and that she had apprently been 'bashed' by the other dogs at the property.
    Anyway, we ended up talking and she was telling me how she would make agility courses out of horse jumps and how much she loved it. She was interested in going to some agility trials but she wasnt sure if she was allowed with her being so anti-social, she asked if she would be allowed to go if she wore a muzzle, my reply was; I have no idea.
    So thats my question, could Oden do agility trials if she wore a muzzle, she was thinking like a grey-hound muzzle.
    I also stated that it could be hard to keep her focused with the other dogs around but she assured me that she has done the horse jumps with other dogs around.
    If it was me, I wouldnt bother it sounds way to risky, but for her sake, whats your opinions and what would the people that run the trials think?

  2. #2
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    Jul 2008
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    Default

    Dog that does agility concentrates very much on jumps and what lies ahead, not on other dogs. Or so it should when in the ring.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2009
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    Default

    She could start training for sure - may never be able to compete- at least not til she had some training and socialisation

  4. #4

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    It could be a really good start for her in getting used to being around other dogs. Before agility they do obedience to a certain level, as much of the agility work is off lead.

    If she's there with a muzzle on and learning to focus on her handler she could grow to feel safe around the other dogs. She needs positive socialising and this sort of training could provide that for her in a controlled environment.

    Muzzles aren't that bad, I think people feel bad about them but dogs really couldn't care less. My Greyhound fosters will stick their faces into them whenever they see them in the hope of going for another walk! They just love them because they have such a positive connotation.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
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    Default

    Alright thanks for that, she has hope!

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