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Thread: Rescue Reject

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    York, Western Australia
    Posts
    36

    Default Rescue Reject

    I was 28 when I got my last dog (from a free puppies sign in someone's yard). A month or so after she died I got Tara from a free to good home ad in the local paper. I am now 51.......so I'm dedicated to giving them a forever home! It's not about getting a dog for free, as sterilising and other vet care costs are way more than the price of a shelter dog.

    Tara has cataracts and arthritis, she is starting to fade. I dread the day I come home from work and find her gone.

    People aren't offering many free-to-good-home pets anymore, rightfully so.....I understand this, but where does it leave someone like me? I don't want a puppy from a BYB, or a pet store, and I don't want a pure bred dog from a show breeder either. I live in the country, and I only have farm fencing around my place - which would disqualify me from acquiring a rescue dog from a shelter..given that most do fence checks. I realise they want the best possible home for their dogs......but some dogs have been in refuges for YEARS. My old girl stays inside when I go to work. She is safe, and fed and loved, and I will look after her until the last breath she takes........yet I'm not suitable to buy a rescue dog.

    Rant over

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Its so frustrating isnt it?
    You must not work < so that's us working class owners out the window as rescue opportunities.
    You must not have small children < why not? do we parents give away our dogs when we get pregnant then?
    You must have a fence that's solid < i live rurally where only fence and rail is permitted and why cant i just train them to stay on property?
    oh and the best piece of crap i was told from PetsHaven: you cant have a male dog, if you already have one, as they fight *sighs*

    this particular rant boils my blood. Id best stop right here. As i have to go dry my hair that is soaked from walking my 2 fighting (not) males in rain this morning, then i can abandon them, whilst i earn the money it takes to keep up all healthy.
    sheesh

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    I think it depends on the rescue, I adopted my two dogs and was actually surprised by the lack of information that they asked.. They didn't ask what fences I had, how much room I had, what hours I worked, and they didn't even ask if we owned or were renting.
    Maybe if you contact a few different rescues and try to compromise with them.. Like they will be inside unless you are outside with them or you construct a secure dog run etc. Maybe working breed rescues will be more willing to adopt out to rural places with rural fencing.
    Please don't give up on rescues - rescue dogs are the best!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    York, Western Australia
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Oh I WILL get a rescue dog again! It isn't possible to securely fence my place, and I'm happy to have a dog inside while I'm at work. I'm hoping Tara has another few years in her, not likely, I know, but I plan to collect long service, quit my job, and go part time in 3 years......this is when I will be looking for a new friend.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    AWL - I think they asked if I was renting. They didn't do a fence check.

    I worry for one of my friends who wants a dog, maybe a puppy. She can't really afford anything but a rescue, she's on the pension and lives in housing trust so she can't do anything about her neighbours leaving the gate open and she lives in the corner between two very busy roads. I just think a gold fish would be a much better idea. She really likes the relationship I have with my dog but I can't take my dog to visit her - just no where for the dog to be off lead.

    She did get a cockatiel but after a few months it died. I don't know why. I don't want to think about why but birds can do that - suddenly or even slowly drop dead for no obvious or fixable reason.

  6. #6

    Default

    There's always the RSPCA.... They seem to let anyone have one

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    The RSPCA is quite strict compared to others.

    I work for a rural rescue and our last foster dog went to a property with farm fencing. I did go do a yard check. And it was up to me to assess whether this particular dog would be fine with those fences and I decided she would be because I knew her well enough and she wasn't prone to running away at all. I also trusted that the dog's new family would have the ability to implement strategies if she did end up jumping the fence.

    So not all rescues are equal. Some do use common sense. Most cannot rehome a dog without doing a yard check simply because they do not want to be responsible if the dog ends up being adopted by a puppy farmer or a hoarder or whatever. In most cases it is a mere formality for our rescue but it's one rule for all.

    So I would ring around. If you explain that you have experience with dogs and capable of training them and never had issues with previous dogs and farm fencing, I'm sure most (not all, I guess) will be fine with that.

    PS: Council pounds won't ask you any questions at all. They are the other end of the spectrum.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Posts
    51

    Default

    As someone who is involved in rescuing dogs, I can understand what you are saying, Tara, but I can also understand why rescues are sometimes so strict.

    You see, people are, in general, stupid. Sometimes we get one that has common sense, but it is not common.

    People think that rescue dogs are simply "happy" and "grateful" to come into their lives, share their couches, be cuddled by their kids, because they were so starved of affection before. They think that this dog will know what a wonderful life it has in store for it, so it will never run away, it will be by the new owner's side from day one and do everything asked of it.

    Unfortunately, when we get an expression of interest for a dog, we have to assume that the person doesn't really have a clue, and therefore have to eliminate as many opportunities for the dog to stuff up before it has a chance to be moulded into the wonderful dog they have in their head. Also, if the dog did do anything wrong, it puts the rescue's reputation on the line.

    FWIW, there are still plenty of dogs being given away FTGH on Facebook, Gumtree, and the like.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Inglewood
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Have you looked on the Dogzonline.com.au site. There is often registered breeders looking to re-home their mature breeding dogs to suitable loving homes.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    re-home their mature breeding dogs
    You really want to check that these mature breeding dogs are used to living with people before you take one on as a pet. Some ANKC registered breeders have hundreds of bitches for breeding and they get almost no people time and really don't know what to do with themselves when invited into a person's home.

    It's good these breeders look to retire their breeding bitches but they really need to make sure the dog gets adjustment time from the tin shed run out the back on the puppy farm, to a human home.
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/general-d...long-post.html

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