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Thread: Dangerous Dog

  1. #11

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    Declaring a dog as dangerous for attacking livestock is wrong IMO. You, the owner or your brother if he was supposed to be in control of the dogs should have to pay compensation to the owner of the livestock and should also cop a pretty hefty fine. Declaring it as dangerous is just ludicrous in my mind. Having said that, I doubt you'll get much joy in the courts, unless maybe you get a very good lawyer and go all the way to the supreme court which will end up costing you 10's of thousands. A horrible situation for you and your dog and one I certainly hope I'm never in.

  2. #12
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    Yes a tricky situation which highlights the need to supervise all dogs when stock are in the area, a hard way to learn that lesson. You did get off lightly as the alpaca owner was in his rights to shoot the dogs.

    A lot of dogs will chase and attack livestock which I agree with mymatejack doesnt make them dangerous just in need of humans to make sure they dont have access to livestock. It is possible that they were more harshly dealt with because of their breeds.

    Sounds like you are lucky to have your dogs back and now you are just going to have to suck up the consequences.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    Yes a tricky situation which highlights the need to supervise all dogs when stock are in the area, a hard way to learn that lesson. You did get off lightly as the alpaca owner was in his rights to shoot the dogs.

    A lot of dogs will chase and attack livestock which I agree with mymatejack doesnt make them dangerous just in need of humans to make sure they dont have access to livestock. It is possible that they were more harshly dealt with because of their breeds.

    Sounds like you are lucky to have your dogs back and now you are just going to have to suck up the consequences.
    That's right lucky you got them back - by the way are they pigging dogs? Just asking
    m<(o.o)>m

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Geelong, Vic
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    Declaring a dog as dangerous for attacking livestock is wrong IMO.
    Easy for you to say. Part of the DD legislation is penalising owners and ensuring there are now provisions the dogs cannot repeat the behavior or the fines will be greater and no second chances if out.

    It's Victorian legislation. Attack on a person or animal can mean the dog can legally be declared dangerous. Just chasing or rushing would have earned them a menacing dog title. You can have behavioral assessments and appeal the decision due to the process not being properly done through VCAT and Dogs On Trial helping, but your animals attacked another animal and caused harm so the best I would aim for is menacing frankly.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  5. #15
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    Aug 2009
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    I agree that chasing livestock doesn't make a dog dangerous to humans, but dogs aren't allowed to be dangerous to other people's property either - and that includes livestock, and they're not allowed to harass wildlife eg kangaroos, echidnas etc. Well not in SA.

    Not sure what the rules are about hunting dogs but some of the animal cruelty prevention people have managed to make hunting with dogs illegal too - which is why any kind of lure coursing competition these days involves a winch, a string and a tshirt bundle - you can't use a live rabbit any more. Even tho the rabbit is vermin.

    And some livestock is outrageously expensive. Eg (successful) race horses, alpaca breeding stock, special pigs, breeding rams. Those cost thousands, sometimes millions of dollars.

    So if your dog is out there with livestock and prone to chasing them given the opportunity, then I can see why councils would declare the dog dangerous. I think it's a historical thing too - when people used to get hung for horse stealing and people got shot for cattle rustling. The idea of the dangerous declaration - is to limit your dog's opportunity to get out and chase and attack critters that it should not.

    If it was prone to doing that to PEOPLE - it would be dead now.

  6. #16

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    Yes we did get off lightly my brother defended himself and pleaded guilty that probably helped the farmer got compensated for his alpaca and we have seen a lawyer and he wants $4400 to apply to VCAT on our behalf, now looking for somebody else

  7. #17

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    totally agree with you Kalacreek dogs need to be trained round live stock, the thing is we rent one acre on a twenty acre block our landlord runs ten head of cattle on the other 19 acres my brothers dog coven [the mastiff x] has been hear 7 years and snow 18 month without a problem the landlord is fine with the dogs and finds it amusing when they play with his calf's, my grandchildren play with the dogs. So are the dogs dangerous ? maybe to alpacas.

  8. #18

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    No the dogs are not pigging dogs purely pets

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Rural Western Australia
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    I think the main thing is that dogs are contained around livestock and I personally wouldnt allow the dogs to play with calves. I myself run a livestock enterprise and have sheepdogs. It might sound odd to many people but my dogs are not allowed to run free without supervision. I only walk the dogs in paddocks where I dont have the livestock and for the rest of the time I have them secure in my house yard. Their lives potentially depend on this vigilance.

    If I am out mending fences or whatever I leave the dogs home or I have them secured near where I am working, with the exception of an old dog that never wanders off. Left to their own devices they could wander get into mischief and round up my livestock. They are much more likely to bring them to me being sheepdogs than maul them but I dont give them the opportunity

    The thing to take away is that dogs are unpredictable around livestock. They are prey animals and the alpacca unfortunately bought those instincts to the surface even in dogs that pose no threat to humans or other dogs.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-04-2014 at 08:04 PM.

  10. #20
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    Alpacca tend to be aggressive too. They will stand their ground and challenge a dog that comes near their paddock. So they're not like cattle at all. Well maybe a bull or a cow with a newborn calf. They can get protective.

    Sometimes where one dog is ok, two dogs together are trouble.

    I know of a couple of cases where some critter thought they were safe with the one dog, but when that dog had a dog friend over - the critter wasn't safe any more.

    All I can say is that a dog run and muzzles will help protect your dogs from the Vic dog laws and neighbouring farmers. Tho a dog with a muzzle can still kill livestock by scaring them to death and herding them into fences.

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