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Thread: Honestly, are you scared of any particular breeds?

  1. #11

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    No breed specific fear here. Agree with most that it's a case by case basis

    I know when I pass a few of the dogs in my local area that I know are pests (a big black lab? and a big nuggetty Jack russell) Scottie goes into defines mode - he tried to go the JRT the other night. Yet he can walk loose lead past a happy dog who barks at us without fail every day (we can't avoid it - it lives at the bottom of our drive). So I get what you're saying when you say Nero looks to you for reassurance.

  2. #12

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    I'm not scared of any breed but I'm wary of any dog I don't know, particularly SWF's and other little yap yaps. I really hate it when little fluffy yap balls come charging up, as, if Brock grabbed one, he could do some serious damage before I got his jaws pried open, although luckily enough he seems to have developed a "Your too small to be worth my time" attitude to them, I'm always mindfull that it will no doubt be my dog blamed if something happened.

  3. #13

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    Troppo I know exactly what you mean. I have become an expert at identifying dogs from very far away, before my companions can usually even see them. If there's a male staffy type, unless I see it interacting with other dogs and engaging in playful and submissive postures we walk away then and there. Being fixated on a ball/frisby or whatever is also a reason for me to walk now because one of the worst attacks we had was by a staffy that was obsessed with his frisbies. He ignored all the dogs in the park, just running and chasing his frisbies (the owner needed 2 to be able to get the frisby off the dog to throw again which should have been a warning sign).

    Anyway, one day whilst chasing his frisby he switched onto a SWF than ran past instead. He shook the poor dog violently. The owner managed to get him off but I never saw the SWF again so I don't know what happened to him. After that I saw the staffy again at the park but I stupidly assumed it had just been his prey drive redirecting and so I stayed there with Sammy. He came over with his frisby in his mouth to the group of dogs, stared at Sammy and as soon as he dropped the frisby I knew we were in trouble. He latched onto Sammy's neck but fortunately although Sammy has only a single coat of fur, he has a lot of excess skin on his neck. The staffy had no collar on so it was extremely hard for the owner to grab his dog. I started whacking the dog on the snout with a thick stick as hard as I could but nothing was making him let go and the owner was also yelling at me not to hurt his dog. I explained that if his dog wasn't trying to kill mine I might be more sympathetic... I was also almost in tears by this stage because it's almost impossible to stay calm when your dog's neck is bleeding, he's crying and not fighting back at all and you can't do anything to get the other dog off. I kept asking Sammy to hold still so we could better grab the staffy but every time he did, the staffy just grabbed more of his neck into his mouth.

    Some of the other dog owners at the park came over, a couple of large guys and they all started beating on this staffy, one guy was just trying to hold the owner back because the only thing he was worried about was his own dog. Anyway, finally, it's kind of horrible but I think they kind of knocked the dog out for a second or two because it almost fell over and let go for a split second. Sammy jumped away thank god and the owner jumped on top of his staffy. It was desperate to get out and get back to Sammy, struggling and growling but credit to the breed, it didn't attack it's owner who was literally lying on top of him. I ran out of the park and took Sammy to the vet, he was in a lot of pain but thankfully, he didn't have any serious injuries.

    I don't know what would have happened if those other guys hadn't of been there, or if Sammy had been a smaller dog and I don't like to think about it. The speed with which the dog went from chasing his frisby to trying to kill my dog was amazing.

    I'm sure these have all been bad owners who haven't bothered to train their dogs, I mean I'm the first to admit that without training Sammy could be a very dangerous dog as well. Anytime you combine a powerful breed with no training you're asking for trouble but I guess I just feel that staffies have very high fight and prey drives compared to a lot of other breeds and combined with how good they are at doing serious damage to other dogs, the fact that they don't seem to care as much about self preservation and that terrier instinct to kill rather than to herd, hold at bay etc instinct that lots of other breeds have just makes for a superior 'anti-dog' machine in the wrong hands.

  4. #14
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    that is a horrible story 99bottles.

    I think if I thought that would happen I'd be carrying round a bottle of home made pepper spray (you can buy pump up misting bottles, but anything with neat hot hot chilli juice would have an effect on an attacking dog).

    Mostly I try to grab the attacking dog by any bit I can catch but it can be hard.

  5. #15
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    I dont trust this little bastard as far as i could kick him. It's my mums Shih tzu 'Sammy' .

    Pure evil ...he hates me and i hate him. He sneeks into my bedroom and shits on my side.....That's why i cut off a big chunk out of his tail fur.... He hasnt forgiven or forgotten that. Lucky it wasnt his throat i cut out ..... but you never know. Tomorrows another day and this war will rage on till one of us karks it or Bronx finally gets hold of him !!

    I admit to fearing him.

    [IMG][/IMG]


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  6. #16
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    I admit that I share that fear of the powerful jaw when it comes to dogs approaching my dog. The last scare I had was when I walked into the dog park after dark and Banjo was pretty much pinned against the gate by a GSD and big rottie. Banjo feels easily threatened by other dogs and will snap out of fear. Really bad idea in that situation. But I have more issues with labs than any other breed. An untrained lab is a real hazard. Not just to other dogs because of them being so pushy and crazy, but sometimes to me too because I've been jumped on by labs trying to steal my treats. And for that reason I am actually also quite terrified of giant breeds. I've been jumped on by a Newfie pup and by my friend's great Dane and that was very scary because of my brittle bones. Banjo however will just sit down and keeps perfectly still when approached by a giant dog.

  7. #17
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    aw poor Sean.

    I would be feeding that dog - a sausage at every family bbq... until he gets the idea that good things come from Sean...

    no sausage for aggressive behaviour. Chuck sausage to reward in position when he's over there being quiet. Tho that might not be good if the other dog is fast. Then again he won't be interested in you for a second.

    And anyone who leaves their bedroom door open deserves what they get. In my case - usually a well munched sock.

  8. #18
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    I can't say I'm afraid of any particular breed - I'm not overly fond of things like chi's and jack russels due to a few too many experiences of poorly trained and controlled examples having a go at my larger dogs (mostly I dislike the idiot owners though), I have had a large mastiff/ dane mix rush me and my dogs when out walking - can't say it was a fun experience, but I still love dogs of that type. The only dog I have been attacked by was a lab - I think I would just feel foolish if I was anti a breed that is usually held up as an example of a perfect friendly family dog

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    Troppo I know exactly what you mean. I have become an expert at identifying dogs from very far away, before my companions can usually even see them. If there's a male staffy type, unless I see it interacting with other dogs and engaging in playful and submissive postures we walk away then and there. Being fixated on a ball/frisby or whatever is also a reason for me to walk now because one of the worst attacks we had was by a staffy that was obsessed with his frisbies. He ignored all the dogs in the park, just running and chasing his frisbies (the owner needed 2 to be able to get the frisby off the dog to throw again which should have been a warning sign).

    Anyway, one day whilst chasing his frisby he switched onto a SWF than ran past instead. He shook the poor dog violently. The owner managed to get him off but I never saw the SWF again so I don't know what happened to him. After that I saw the staffy again at the park but I stupidly assumed it had just been his prey drive redirecting and so I stayed there with Sammy. He came over with his frisby in his mouth to the group of dogs, stared at Sammy and as soon as he dropped the frisby I knew we were in trouble. He latched onto Sammy's neck but fortunately although Sammy has only a single coat of fur, he has a lot of excess skin on his neck. The staffy had no collar on so it was extremely hard for the owner to grab his dog. I started whacking the dog on the snout with a thick stick as hard as I could but nothing was making him let go and the owner was also yelling at me not to hurt his dog. I explained that if his dog wasn't trying to kill mine I might be more sympathetic... I was also almost in tears by this stage because it's almost impossible to stay calm when your dog's neck is bleeding, he's crying and not fighting back at all and you can't do anything to get the other dog off. I kept asking Sammy to hold still so we could better grab the staffy but every time he did, the staffy just grabbed more of his neck into his mouth.

    Some of the other dog owners at the park came over, a couple of large guys and they all started beating on this staffy, one guy was just trying to hold the owner back because the only thing he was worried about was his own dog. Anyway, finally, it's kind of horrible but I think they kind of knocked the dog out for a second or two because it almost fell over and let go for a split second. Sammy jumped away thank god and the owner jumped on top of his staffy. It was desperate to get out and get back to Sammy, struggling and growling but credit to the breed, it didn't attack it's owner who was literally lying on top of him. I ran out of the park and took Sammy to the vet, he was in a lot of pain but thankfully, he didn't have any serious injuries.

    I don't know what would have happened if those other guys hadn't of been there, or if Sammy had been a smaller dog and I don't like to think about it. The speed with which the dog went from chasing his frisby to trying to kill my dog was amazing.

    I'm sure these have all been bad owners who haven't bothered to train their dogs, I mean I'm the first to admit that without training Sammy could be a very dangerous dog as well. Anytime you combine a powerful breed with no training you're asking for trouble but I guess I just feel that staffies have very high fight and prey drives compared to a lot of other breeds and combined with how good they are at doing serious damage to other dogs, the fact that they don't seem to care as much about self preservation and that terrier instinct to kill rather than to herd, hold at bay etc instinct that lots of other breeds have just makes for a superior 'anti-dog' machine in the wrong hands.
    Trying to beat a Stafford off when it's decided it wants to go is pretty much a useless excercise. With Staffords, remember, they should never redirect their aggression so don't be too afraid to get in there and have a go(you obviously need to decide whether you're willing to take the risk of getting bitten). Consider carrying a break stick and knowing how to use it. Personally I don't bother with a break stick but I'm willing to use my fingers to do the same job .. i.e grab the snout of the dog that has a hold and roll their lips over their teeth and squeeze until the pain makes them let go ... dangerous as far as getting bitten myself but I'm willing to take that risk. Another thing to remember is if a Stafford has a hold and it's only skin that held, don't stress, but most definately don't try to pull them apart, while they only have a hold of skin it's at worst puncture wounds, try and rip them off and you'll rip skin making the injuries much worse. At the very least, get a hold of the Stafford and hold them until they let go ... if you try and hold your dog it gives the Stafford the chance to play tug of war, roll etc again turning puncture wounds into ripped skin.

  10. #20

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    I was told to shove your fingers into its nose and pry its mouth open. Putting my fingers into an angry dogs mouth sounds scary.

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